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PToN
Premium
join:2001-10-04
Houston, TX
reply to PToN

Re: Mailbox sizes... WTF...?!?!?!

Dedup sounds nice, but it doesnt play well when restoring data. This is something similar to using Eudora back in the day... Good luck getting the attachment that came with that email..!!

We have lowered the attachment size to 10MB, i guess they must be sending multiple 10MB emails.

I do agree with the retention policy, but i find it hard to get upper management behind this. They are the ones that use the "Deleted Items" folder store emails...

We are working on deploying Sharepoint or Alfresco so that they can easily send a link, but i think i'd have to be harsh on this, like drop all attachments from internal emails or something like this.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
Also one feature of exchange (similar to dedup) I'm told "single instance" (or atleast that's what I recall it being called by a IT manager)

It was that when you send an attachment to multiple people that it only counts as one e-mail in your sent items, but when the mailbox is moved the space in the exch DB multiplies by the number of people you sent it to.

(Not really sure of the accuracy there but anyway)
--
»www.change.org/petitions/create-···imcity-4


PToN
Premium
join:2001-10-04
Houston, TX
Yeah, but that has the same challenges when it comes the time to do a restore... Maybe exchange has an effective way of getting it done.


DC DSL
There's a reason I'm Command.
Premium
join:2000-07-30
Washington, DC
kudos:2
reply to PToN
said by PToN:

We have lowered the attachment size to 10MB, i guess they must be sending multiple 10MB emails.

I uniformly restrict attachments to 2mb because many receiving sites still cutoff at that. For large file exchanges, we use the clients' websites or a cloud solution. Not only does this eliminate a lot of clutter and redundancy in the mailstore and file system, it also frees-up bandwidth across the board, not to mention eliminates the time-wasting calls about "I've tried sending this message 10x and it keeps bouncing with 'too big for mailbox'..."

I also restrict mailbox size to between 2 and 3.5gb. I started doing this after a client was subpoenaed for the emails of specific employees (not the whole organization). This guarantees that a mailbox can be dumped in its entirety at any time to a PST that fits on a single DVD.

said by PToN:

I do agree with the retention policy, but i find it hard to get upper management behind this. They are the ones that use the "Deleted Items" folder store emails...

I know that pain all too well. However, my experience has been that after they've had a few weeks to get the bitching about the tyrant CIO and yet another of his stupid rules out of their their system, you don't hear much, if any, further grousing about it.

One tactic I have used with those hell-bent on misusing the Deleted folder is to send out a notice that routine cleanup on the mailboxes will be performed and that anything in the deleted messages folders will be permanently lost as a result...and that this will be the case from now on to avoid problems with the server. Dump the folder to a PST, delete the contents, and set Outlook to empty it on exit. (Make sure Exchange is set to not purge deleted items until after backing-up.) The user will freak the f* out. "I said this was going to happen." They usually get with the program after that.

Another tactic is to make sure their wastebasket is overflowing (add stuff from others if necessary), hide it before the cleaning crew arrives. Put it back after they're gone. The person will certainly note (and likely complain) that there's stuff in there. Teachable moment: It's the same as not emptying your deleted items folder. Use mail folders correctly and you won't have problems.
--
"Dance like the photo isn't being tagged; love like you've never been unfriended; and tweet like nobody is following."


donoreo
Premium
join:2002-05-30
North York, ON
reply to PToN
said by PToN:

I do agree with the retention policy, but i find it hard to get upper management behind this. They are the ones that use the "Deleted Items" folder store emails...

The first time I saw someone doing this it was a huge WTF?!?! moment. I told them that there is an option to empty "Deleted Items on Exit" and that with any update Microsoft issues it could get turned on by accident or on purpose in the update and they would lose everything. They stopped using Deleted Items as a filing location.
--
The irony of common sense, it is not that common.
I cannot deny anything I did not say.
A kitten dies every time someone uses "then" and "than" incorrectly.
I mock people who give their children odd spelling of names.


SHoTTa35

@kfvaluation.com
I allow up to 50MB attachments on the Receive connector for Exchange 2012 because we deal with banks and other "secure" places that aren't allowed to use certain protocols (FTP) or sites (Dropbox & Google Drive blocked), USB Mas Storage devices are obviously blocked as well via Group Policy so the only way for them to get sometimes hundreds of pages of documents is via email (or physical mail, FedEx/UPS/USPS).

Our send connector could be 100MB but I've found basically nobody can accept that anyways so I've set it at 20MB

My Inbox of 2yrs now is like 5.7GB with about 12,000 messages in Outlook. I've set a 10GB limit anyways so better start cleaning up or no more emails for you!

lorennerol
Premium
join:2003-10-29
Seattle, WA
reply to DarkLogix
said by DarkLogix:

Also one feature of exchange (similar to dedup) I'm told "single instance" (or atleast that's what I recall it being called by a IT manager)

MS removed SIMS in Exchange 2010. They published a long and rambling explanation about why. It had something to do with cheap disk space and a performance increase.

The vast majority of these huge mailboxes I see is just laziness. A quick inspection of the user's inbox, sent, and deleted folders typically reveal tens of thousands of emails; they just never clean anything up.

I've given up harping about it. I just tell clients they either change the habits of users or throw money at the problem. Except the few still on Exchange 2003 who have hit the max database size and are forced to cleanup, they all choose to spend money.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
Ya just sort the sent items by size and look out.


DC DSL
There's a reason I'm Command.
Premium
join:2000-07-30
Washington, DC
kudos:2
reply to lorennerol
said by lorennerol:

said by DarkLogix:

Also one feature of exchange (similar to dedup) I'm told "single instance" (or atleast that's what I recall it being called by a IT manager)

MS removed SIMS in Exchange 2010. They published a long and rambling explanation about why. It had something to do with cheap disk space and a performance increase.

Way back when a domain consisted of servers that mostly sat within a short cable hop of each other, it made sense to single-instance attachments. Now that the servers can be all around the planet it poses countless issues to maintain sync and consistency...attachments or not.

For the enlightenment of the unrepentant recalcitrants, I stage the occasional "blow away the mailbox" demonstrations. After dumping to a PST and copying it to a couple of locations, I press the magic *POOF!* button and wipe their messages out of existence. Daddy does his magic and fixes and tells them they have until COB the next day to get it cleaned up and to keep it clean because it could happen again...and you never know when it will be something that can't be recovered. A few times the mortal didn't comply so I did it again and "could only recover" the last month's worth of stuff that was in the inbox. Followed up with a memo to them and their bosses that the mortals were warned, did not heed, violated policy, and I would hear no further complaining about the matter. The message was received and understood. (Always make sure you have copies so you can retrieve anything truly critical.)
--
"Dance like the photo isn't being tagged; love like you've never been unfriended; and tweet like nobody is following."