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dharel1705

join:2009-06-09
Merrick, NY
reply to TheSMJ

Re: Should I run RG6 or skip it?

For resale value of your house, and since the walls are already open, run the RG6.



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by dharel1705:

For resale value of your house

That's an expense that will return 0% at resale.

The buyers might appreciate the RG6, but it will not make them pay more, or pick that house over another one no matter what.

If TheSMJ sees no need for CATV today, he will never need it in the future. He's best to spend that money on network wiring or pocket it.

Critsmcgee

join:2011-12-02
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

said by alkizmo:

said by dharel1705:

For resale value of your house

That's an expense that will return 0% at resale.

The buyers might appreciate the RG6, but it will not make them pay more, or pick that house over another one no matter what.

It won't add any value to the property but it will play into the decision making process. $40 in cable now or hundreds of dollars later. It played into my house searching 2 years ago.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by Critsmcgee:

It won't add any value to the property but it will play into the decision making process.

I am not in real estate, but I am a lot in mortgages at work.
I could ask realtors if you want, but I am 99% certain that this will NOT play any role in the decision making.

Even if you had two houses side-by-side that were IDENTICAL and one had CATV wiring while the other one didn't, the tie-breaking factor will be about what/who are the neighbors and not whether the house has CATV or not.

Ostracus

join:2011-09-05
Henderson, KY

Commodity status, or rather the service is perceived as such. If it was Ethernet, then it might mean something if say Google fiber eventually came to one's town.


robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

I bought an older house a good number of years ago. I knew it needed work and got it for a good price. Between abandoned and in use phone and cable wires, I took about 3/4 mile of cable off of the outside of that house. A wired house adds value to anyone who has had to experience having drops installed by either the cable company or the Telco. If Ostracus See Profile and rumors are correct, then the rewiring I did (including ethernet) may "mean something" if Google announces they are bring fiber to Austin at the news conference next Tuesday as is being suggested.

My recommendation is to wire every room that has exposed wall framework where cable may someday be desired.


Critsmcgee

join:2011-12-02
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

4 edits
reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

said by Critsmcgee:

It won't add any value to the property but it will play into the decision making process.

I am not in real estate, but I am a lot in mortgages at work.
I could ask realtors if you want, but I am 99% certain that this will NOT play any role in the decision making.

Even if you had two houses side-by-side that were IDENTICAL and one had CATV wiring while the other one didn't, the tie-breaking factor will be about what/who are the neighbors and not whether the house has CATV or not.

Ask anyone you want and as many of them as you want. I've bought 3 houses and coax has been a requirement in all 3 for me. My sister and parents the same. As a matter of fact even the service providers came into the picture. Last year when I bought this house FIOS was a requirement. The fact is coax DOES play a role in decision making for some people. Discount it all you want but blanket statements will never win and you know it. At best you can say something like "For most people it won't play into the decision process". A 100% statement just gets you into trouble.

For your example those people don't know what to look for. The most common problem with people is they don't know what they want or what to look for. A Realtor will tell you whatever sells the house. Do they care if you have cable or internet once you buy the house? NO! Do they care if it costs you $300-500 to have the house wired? NO! This is a classic hindsight problem with buying property.

Next people will be saying a septic system vs sewer or electric range vs gas range or driveway length/material doesn't play into the decision.


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4

Major utilities and appliances like those you listed have always played a role in choosing a house for most people. Whether coax is run in the walls has not played a role for most people.

Not a 100% statement. But you are in a significant minority as a buyer that would pass up a house you otherwise love just because of the lack of coax runs.



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to Critsmcgee

said by Critsmcgee:

Ask anyone you want and as many of them as you want. I've bought 3 houses and coax has been a requirement in all 3 for me. My sister and parents the same. As a matter of fact even the service providers came into the picture. Last year when I bought this house FIOS was a requirement. The fact is coax DOES play a role in decision making for some people.

I don't know if these houses were new construction (as in you could DEMAND the installation of the cables).

A used house is a different story. You hunt and hunt for a house in the right area of the right style of the right size, it's not custom made to you. Once you find that house, you'll be lenient as to whether or not there is network/catv wiring.

A bit like house inspection, if you're buying a old house, you can't DEMAND that the inspection finds nothing old in the house.

said by Critsmcgee:

Discount it all you want but blanket statements will never win and you know it. At best you can say something like "For most people it won't play into the decision process". A 100% statement just gets you into trouble.

There are always exceptions, but as a house improvement investment, it will bear very little return. It's not just the spool that costs $$$, it's the termination jacks, the labor, and 500' will get little coverage especially if you want dedicated lines to every room (instead of piggy backing from room to room).

said by Critsmcgee:

For your example those people don't know what to look for. The most common problem with people is they don't know what they want or what to look for. A Realtor will tell you whatever sells the house. Do they care if you have cable or internet once you buy the house? NO! Do they care if it costs you $300-500 to have the house wired? NO! This is a classic hindsight problem with buying property.

And if you find a house you like and it is not wired, you can't demand it to be wired (at least, in my local realestate market). It's more lucrative to negotiate over the price and not over the wiring.

In OP's case, he doesn't need CATV, so for him it's a bad expensive. If he wants a real using addition, he should run conduits that are easy to use for pulling anyy sort of cable in the future. 50 years later, when we're using house-central-nerve-system wiring to wire brain scanners in every room, they'll be glad they had conduit in place, they won't care for the obsolete CATV.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

It's not something to demand but for many it could make a difference between two competing properties. The cost of materials is minor compared to the cost of labor to wire the house retroactively. Conduit is nice but both cost and labor are greater than coax. As far as future proofing, high quality coax can support a very large amount of bandwidth. For instance, you can't get a coax to ethernet converter to run cable over an ethernet line, but you can get an ethernet to coax convertor to run ethernet over coax.


Ostracus

join:2011-09-05
Henderson, KY

»www.costcaptain.com/mm5/merchant···od2E4A2Q

Reasonably priced to boot. Who would have thought it?


Critsmcgee

join:2011-12-02
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

And if you find a house you like and it is not wired, you can't demand it to be wired (at least, in my local realestate market). It's more lucrative to negotiate over the price and not over the wiring.

The wiring is the price negotiation. No wiring means you can reduce the price whether they like it or not. Will they let the deal fall though over $500? I doubt it. In the end no wiring can cost you money. Based on that who would argue that it doesn't affect the sale?


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by Critsmcgee:

said by alkizmo:

And if you find a house you like and it is not wired, you can't demand it to be wired (at least, in my local realestate market). It's more lucrative to negotiate over the price and not over the wiring.

The wiring is the price negotiation. No wiring means you can reduce the price whether they like it or not. Will they let the deal fall though over $500? I doubt it. In the end no wiring can cost you money. Based on that who would argue that it doesn't affect the sale?

It is still a gamble. You would Spend a couple of hundred dollars now for something you won't use in order to maybe not have to discount a multihundred dollars house price by a few hundred bucks.

I have never seen negotiations go like that (asking a lowered price because a luxury feature is not present). I am not saying it never happens, but it must be rare, and I mostly underwrite mortgages for old houses (guaranteed not to have that stuff).

Critsmcgee

join:2011-12-02
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

said by alkizmo:

said by Critsmcgee:

said by alkizmo:

And if you find a house you like and it is not wired, you can't demand it to be wired (at least, in my local realestate market). It's more lucrative to negotiate over the price and not over the wiring.

The wiring is the price negotiation. No wiring means you can reduce the price whether they like it or not. Will they let the deal fall though over $500? I doubt it. In the end no wiring can cost you money. Based on that who would argue that it doesn't affect the sale?

It is still a gamble. You would Spend a couple of hundred dollars now for something you won't use in order to maybe not have to discount a multihundred dollars house price by a few hundred bucks.

I have never seen negotiations go like that (asking a lowered price because a luxury feature is not present). I am not saying it never happens, but it must be rare, and I mostly underwrite mortgages for old houses (guaranteed not to have that stuff).

The OP's house is from 1959 and it will have it. Mine is from 1960 and it has it. Are you talking about houses older then that? My parent's in law have a 1930's house with it. Everything with property is a gamble. Just because you spend $100,000 on addition doesn't mean the new addition is worth $100,000. You might only see $50,000 return. Once upon a time coax was a luxury item but with everything online it's no longer in that category. There's where people are confused. I don't know anyone who doesn't have internet. Maybe it's different in Canada.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

said by Critsmcgee:

The OP's house is from 1959 and it will have it. Mine is from 1960 and it has it. Are you talking about houses older then that?

My house is from 1964 and it doesn't have it.

said by Critsmcgee:

Once upon a time coax was a luxury item but with everything online it's no longer in that category. There's where people are confused. I don't know anyone who doesn't have internet. Maybe it's different in Canada.

Back in the 90s and early '00s, people did care about CATV being in every room. That's why older houses had it added later on.

However, as you said, it's a lot less important now because of bedroom TVs being replaced by bedroom laptops

That's why I said it's a luxury, because while we still use it, it is not important anymore.

With HDTV cable providers forcing you to pay an extra monthly fee for additional HDTV boxes per household. People just limit cable TV to one or two TV and everything else is on the computer.

said by Critsmcgee:

Just because you spend $100,000 on addition doesn't mean the new addition is worth $100,000. You might only see $50,000 return.

You spend 100,000$ on a house at the risk of only getting 50,000$ back only because you want to enjoy the upgrades yourself before selling.

OP doesn't need CATV, so it's a loss. He'll install CATV, never use it for years, and by the time he sells the house, people will see the CATV outlets are an eye sore like we do for telephone jacks (useless, ripped out and patched next time they paint a room).

We're missing the entire point here though.
The OP doesn't need CATV, but he wants to use the opportunity while his walls are open. He should compromise by spending the same amount of $$$ on getting conduits to fewer, but key, locations instead of wiring CATV to every room.

Critsmcgee

join:2011-12-02
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

said by alkizmo:

He should compromise by spending the same amount of $$$ on getting conduits to fewer, but key, locations instead of wiring CATV to every room.

That's more expensive in materials and much harder to do labor wise not to mention the OP already bought the RG6. I seriously doubt they are going to shift gears at this point. Ideally that would be the best way to go but that's insanely rare in new and old construction.