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glombica

join:2011-10-16
t6t0n3

[AB] wifi interference from neighbours

hey guys,
ok so here is my situation:
I live in a townhouse. 3 stories. garage on the main, living room dining on 2nd and bedrooms on 3rd.
the actiontech is in the garage (where all my Ethernet cables meet, and the telus connection comes in.

I have wireless n only set on the Actiontec, and still i'm having issue with getting a good speeds on the 2nd and 3rd floors. I used inssider and found that one telus customer is using two netgear extenders.. and the signal strength is almost the same as mine.
I went out and bought a wifi booster and connected it to the lan port on the 3rd floor. »www.memoryexpress.com/Products/M ··· /MX35165

set the same passphrase, ssid just a different channel. speed is a bit bette but still a royal pain in the...

i can't just go out and knock on my neighbours doors and be like.. hey.. can you chill with the overkill of wifi signal

any suggestions?


pfak
Premium
join:2002-12-29
Vancouver, BC
Use a wired connection instead.
--
The more I C, the less I see.


humanfilth

join:2013-02-14
cyber gutter
reply to glombica
can your wireless computers use 5Ghz? As your extender has it available.

Does your wireless computers have full strength wifi hardware and not some cheap 20 foot range junk. If the base is strong but the mobile computer wifi is weak, its like whizzing into the wind.

Put your extender in a corner and make a tinfoil reflector that concentrates it into the room where you use the wireless computers.
I see your extender has 6 directional antennas so see if you can kill the unneeded directions(pointing outside to nothingness).

And other tips shall not be mentioned to reduce neighbors overly aggressive wifi.

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel

1 edit
reply to glombica
Do you have multiple WiFi client device that you've tried and they're all getting slow speeds?

Unfortunately there's not much you can do about the interference if the airwaves are overcrowded in your area. Neighbors are well within their rights to use as many WiFi devices as they like, as long as they all comply with the applicable regulations. All you might be able to do is talk to them and see if they'll let you offer some help optimizing their network setup to cause less interference. Perhaps they don't need as many access points as they have, or perhaps they could do well with a little less power output.

It's also possible someone has a device which is malfunctioning, or that is in violation of applicable regulations. But this will be impossible to determine without specialized equipment to analyze the 2.4GHz band spectrum and find the source of any offending signals.

Another point to consider is that the 2.4GHz band is not only used for WiFi, but also Bluetooth, cordless phones, and a number of other wireless devices none of which will show up on any software tool such as INSSIDER. Again, these would require specialized equipment to detect.

If installing wireless access points, changing channels, and increasing power setting doesn't do the trick, you're going to have to start considering other options.

For instance, WiFi using the 5GHz band, although both the access point AND the client devices must be 5GHz capable. While 5GHz or dual-band wireless adapters for laptops and desktop computers are readily available, few "mobile" (smartphone, tablet, etc) devices support 5GHz unfortunately.

Powerline ethernet is an other option that may work well, although this will only work for devices with an ethernet port.

Or just good old reliable wired ethernet.

As you can tell, WiFi can be rather complicated and challenging to troubleshoot and set up properly sometimes.


BimmerE38FN

join:2002-09-15
Boise, ID
kudos:1
Reviews:
·CableOne
reply to glombica
Use InSSIDer application to see if you can find a open channel. If one is available, use them.

If not, then like the others have said, the 2.4Ghz frequency can get used up on the 11 channels available so you might want upgrade, what devices you can to 5Ghz.

Some suggestions:
»forums.dlink.com/index.php?topic ··· =50738.0


Darhole
Premium
join:2005-06-14
Edmonton, AB
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TELUS
i have the craziest issues with inssider atm.
The 40hz band/channel I'm on right now carries a link score of around 10, and I get almost full DL/UL out of my actiontech.
I switch to a different channel on the 40hz band, link score of 40, DL is down from around 45 to 20 or so. Connected at 150mb on both times.

If I run at 20hz, my DL is like 12mbit on wireless, with a linkscore of 30+.

I cannot explain this.

alphaz18

join:2005-02-26
CANADA
that's absolutely the problem. if you're using N and you using 40hz chances are you will get shit tons of problems. I just put in a half dozen access points into a business on a floor that's almost only them. works fine for some pings then it goes to hell like 2000ms then timeouts and all sorts of shit. then comes back for a few seconds and continues like that. then I adjusted the laptop to use only 20hz( 72mbps ) . and instant ROCK solid connection. all the while my phone and other wifi devices work fine. In conclusion, 40 hz is for people that don't know what they're doing or are on a farm with NO other wifi around. otherwise its just bugged useless garbage. spent hours diagnosing it. not to mention it will only get worse because people are like zomg my wifi doesn't work put more power .. or use more N or use more hz! Honestly wifi is IT's worst nightmare. how anyone could think that it will replace wires is beyond all reason.


Darhole
Premium
join:2005-06-14
Edmonton, AB
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TELUS
Your generalizations are flat out wrong.

Is there more interference? There certainly can be and usually is, as it spans multiple channels.

Does that mean performance is going to be better on 20 hz? Not neccessarily. In my case, even on the speedtests when their is more overhead than usual, my speed tests come out higher on 40hz.

I consistently get 35+ mbit on 40hz, while 20 limits me to 20-25. (highest test ever was about 28).

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
reply to Darhole
said by Darhole:

If I run at 20hz, my DL is like 12mbit on wireless, with a linkscore of 30+.

I cannot explain this.

Neither can I...

20hz and 40hz are not RF frequencies they are audio frequencies. How are you running a wireless network at such impossible frequencies?

Seriously, what are you talking about? You've got your frequencies all wrong!

WhosTheBosch

join:2009-12-02
said by TheMG See ProfileNeither can I...

20hz and 40hz are not RF frequencies they are audio frequencies. How are you running a wireless network at such impossible frequencies?

Seriously, what are you talking about? You've got your frequencies all wrong!
[/BQUOTE :

They mean channel width, in MHz, which basically increases throughput. I think alphaz might be mistaken when he says it was an issue.

If anyone else can confirm I believe the Actiontec is a limiting factor because for some reason I could never reach my full limit with it. On the 25 package the most I got wirelessly was 13.5mbps on a 144mbps connection via wireless N. Then on the 50 package I got a 30-35mbps speed on a 144mbps connection via wireless N. I also tried changing the channels and the channel width to no avail.

Wired I get full speed so I go that way.



Darhole
Premium
join:2005-06-14
Edmonton, AB
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TELUS
It has got to be the actiontech. For one, every router I've ever bought allowed a dualchannel to hit the 300mbps capabilities of a wireless N connection.

And second, I never had this drop off with 3 different d-link routers at my other house with shaw


rustydusty

join:2009-09-29
Red Deer County, AB
reply to glombica
I'm using a DAP-2553 and getting amazing speeds and signal. A good 150+ FT of range outside of our 1800sqft per floor house. Speeds are some of the best I've gotten from an AP. If you don't mind spending the extra cash, I would suggest a proper corporate AP. It has built in rogue detection which should pick a channel not being used, and also over power any other device that tries to use it, forcing it to switch. Multi-SSID, vlan tagging, etc.

alphaz18

join:2005-02-26
CANADA
reply to WhosTheBosch
ya bosch you were right, I was mistaken
it ended up being just that many implementations of the N wireless cards are completely broken. (realtek)
if you set them to 40hz they literally drop and flake out every few min. because I tried it in a random area where there was literally no other signals and it was still doing that.
then I forced the idiotic realtek cards to 20hz channel widths and connection magically became rock solid. second you changed it to 40 hz the card just died and if you reset the card, it would come up for a few min decently then die again. tried it on 4 different laptops with realtek cards.updated all the drivers etcetc. even talked to realtek.. all the exact same symptoms. all the while other devices worked fine. ordered some Atheros cards for my clients laptops, hopefully that makes it better.. :\


Tornado15550

join:2012-12-16
Canada
Reviews:
·TELUS
reply to glombica
I completely agree. Changing the channel width to 20Mhz makes a big difference. I have a lot of wireless interference, but after changing from 40MHz to 20MHz, it increased my performance.

If you have an android device, you can download the app 'Wifi Analyzer' (free app), and go to channel rating to see what the best channel to use is (in my case, it was channel 6). It really helped improve my wireless performance.

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
Actually this makes perfect sense. The total maximum transmit power doesn't change, so when you use a wider channel width, that power is spread out. You get less effective power per unit of channel width, which means the signal will have decreased range and becomes more susceptible to interference.

On the other hand, if you can concentrate the available transmit power into a narrower channel, the signal will be able to go further and be less susceptible to interference. Of course, a narrower channel will not be able to support the maximum bandwidth that the 802.11N specification is capable of, which is a moot point if interference prohibits a wider channel from being reliable.