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fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

More kitchen questions - suggestions needed

Sorry about all the kitchen questions. I plan on getting it done within the next year, so I better start planning now! Kitchen is about 120 square feet. House is about 1300 square feet.

1. When is the best time of year to buy cabinets and other kitchen accessories? Like when are the most deals? I'm guessing now is a bad time since everyone is receiving their tax checks and spending them.

2. Does insulation go on the inside walls, or just the outside walls? I think just the outside if I remember from when I got my bathroom done.

3. It's unknown whether the textured ceiling (house is from 1924) contains any asbestos, as I have not collected a sample and sent it for testing. Even if it was NOT asbestos, it would still have to be either painted over or removed somehow. Is the safest way to just put the thinnest layer of drywall on top of it and call it a day? If that would be ok and I'd sell the house in the future, how would I answer an asbestos question since I wouldn't know if I even had it in the first place, but it would be covered by drywall either way.

4. Replace the existing wooden windows or get rid of them and put new ones in? I read an article in the newspaper that old windows shouldn't be thrown away due to having character/style with the house. Instead they should just be fixed up. One of the panes of glass is cracked too. Suggestions?

5. For flooring, I will end up having enough flooring left over (laminate) that I had from when I had my house's floor re-done (every floor except the kitchen was re-done). My bathroom has tile, and I think the kitchen would look good with tile, but what is your take on just using the rest of the laminate for the kitchen? Not sure how laminate holds up to high traffic areas or potential kitchen spills, etc. I've had this laminate for 2 years now since I never got around to getting someone to do the floor, so I probably can't return it. Kind of a waste of a couple hundred dollars worth of laminate if I don't use it for the kitchen. However, I still think tile might be better.

6. Stove is gas and it's two or three years old (bought it when I moved in). Fridge is electric and the same age. It has an ice maker but I never hooked it up since I don't know where it hooks to. What are the standards for dedicated outlets these days? What about GFCIs? Is that standard for all kitchen outlets, or just near the sink? I'm guessing fridge doesn't get one since they can trip randomly and then the fridge would be off until someone noticed. Only appliances I will buy is a built in microwave/hood that will go over the stove, and then a built in dishwasher.

Thoughts on any or all of these points? My bathroom cost $3000 for parts and labor. I estimate that this project will cost between $4500 and $6000 total for parts and labor. A family member did their slightly smaller kitchen for much less than that.


kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL
Reviews:
·Charter

1. When is the best time of year to buy cabinets and other kitchen accessories? Like when are the most deals? I'm guessing now is a bad time since everyone is receiving their tax checks and spending them.

If you go to a HD or so, they are likely to run specials because people have money and they will be competing for that $$$$. If you go to a strictly cabinet shop, the ones around here rarely have specials. I always design my own layout and go to local lumber yards to find the best deal because I like a certain brand and the HD's don't carry them. If you go with granite or other 1 piece top, make sure they measure the size needed.



28727686

join:2013-04-08
reply to fartness

said by fartness:

6. Stove is gas and it's two or three years old (bought it when I moved in). Fridge is electric and the same age. It has an ice maker but I never hooked it up since I don't know where it hooks to. What are the standards for dedicated outlets these days? What about GFCIs? Is that standard for all kitchen outlets, or just near the sink? I'm guessing fridge doesn't get one since they can trip randomly and then the fridge would be off until someone noticed. Only appliances I will buy is a built in microwave/hood that will go over the stove, and then a built in dishwasher.

More then likely when you remodel the kitchen the building inspector will make you get the kitchen up to code. That means you need GFCI's on EVERY useable outlet. If you do a microwave/hood they might make you run a dedicated circuit for it and possibly vent it outside. Dishwasher should have it's own circuit as well. You might want to just call your building inspector and ask them on some of this stuff. They are the one going to sign off on your project. They can tell you about the insulation, dedicated circuits, GFCI, venting the hood, and ceiling. They should even have an opinion on the windows. In the end they are the only person who matters as you need their blessing to do the project. Build to what they want and save yourself a ton of headaches.

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI

Why would GFCIs be needed other than within a certain distance of the sink?


95688065

join:2013-01-28

said by garys_2k:

Why would GFCIs be needed other than within a certain distance of the sink?

NEC 210.8(A)(6) says all countertop receptacles need to be GFCI.


leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to fartness

said by fartness:

3. It's unknown whether the textured ceiling (house is from 1924) contains any asbestos, as I have not collected a sample and sent it for testing. Even if it was NOT asbestos, it would still have to be either painted over or removed somehow. Is the safest way to just put the thinnest layer of drywall on top of it and call it a day?

No, if you put the thinnest layer of drywall (1/4") on the ceiling it is likely to sag or collapse under its own weight. 1/2" sag-resistant or 5/8" drywall should be appropriate (check local codes).

said by fartness:

If that would be ok and I'd sell the house in the future, how would I answer an asbestos question since I wouldn't know if I even had it in the first place, but it would be covered by drywall either way.

What information was disclosed to you when you bought the home ?
Typically in those situations the disclosure states that homes of this age may contain asbestos but that no specific presence of asbestos was disclosed to you nor did you ever discover the presence of asbestos through any testing in the entire time you owned the home.
Of course, if the previous owner disclosed to you the presence of asbestos or if you or a contractor you hired ever found asbestos in the home then you do need to disclose that fact.
--
Got some spare cpu cycles ? Join Team Helix or Team Starfire!


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

It was an estate sale, so the executor half assed the disclosure. I guess they were allowed to do that even though they lived here and knew everything wrong with the place.


towerdave

join:2002-01-16
O Fallon, IL
reply to 95688065

said by 95688065:

said by garys_2k:

Why would GFCIs be needed other than within a certain distance of the sink?

NEC 210.8(A)(6) says all countertop receptacles need to be GFCI.

GFCI Protected. I have two circuits for my countertop receptacles, per code. One GFCI per circuit, then regular receptacles beyond that on the circuits.

TD


Bubba
GIT-R-DONE
Premium,MVM
join:2002-08-19
St. Andrews
reply to fartness

Insulation on some interior walls can be a benefit. For instance a laundry room where insulation would lessen the noise coming from washer/dryer.



fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

It's in my basement, but I could probably put some insulation on the ceiling to quiet it down a bit.

Expand your moderator at work


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to fartness

Re: More kitchen questions - suggestions needed

Would I use regular drywall in the kitchen or the same kind I used in my bathroom (anti-mold, green or whatever it is)?


Tig

join:2006-06-29
Carrying Place, ON
Reviews:
·voip.ms

1 edit
reply to fartness

1) I insulate my interior wall for sound. It gives the house a more solid feel if you hear less from other rooms.

4) It breaks my heart to see the style of a house distorted with the wrong style windows. If you have to replace them, make sure you get it right.
I built a Victorian farm house and my wife spec'd out the windows. She nailed it. It's the detail that brings everything together, inside and out.
FWIW, Old windows with broken panes can be repaired. Although this is not a skill of the typical installer. You may need to seek out an old carpenter or restoration business for advice.



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by Tig:

FWIW, Old windows with broken panes can be repaired. Although this not skill of the typical installer. You may need to seek out an old carpenter or restoration business for advice.

That's because younger people have a hammer and saw it doesn't make them a carpenter. The older real carpenters are becoming fewer and far between.

The ability to text on a smart phone doesn't provide any usable skills needed in life.

TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI
reply to 95688065

said by 95688065:

said by garys_2k:

Why would GFCIs be needed other than within a certain distance of the sink?

NEC 210.8(A)(6) says all countertop receptacles need to be GFCI.

This is news to me. When I bought my house two months ago the inspector told me that only outlets within 6 feet of a water source need to be on GFCI.

Tig

join:2006-06-29
Carrying Place, ON
Reviews:
·voip.ms

2 edits
reply to Jack_in_VA

Repairing an old window isn't very complicated at all, but it would be hard to make a living at it these days. Few would make it worth your while. The quick buck is in putting a new window in the hole and floaming it in place.
Fartness, you seem like a very capable guy and I'm sure you could repair that window in an afternoon. The trickiest part is cutting the replacement glass and any glass shop could do that part for you. If you really want to be authentic, find some old window glass of a similar vintage and do it yourself. New glass looks different.

The glass is installed in the mullion and or frame from the inside and sealed to the outside with glazing tape. That glazing tape may be rather crusty by now in contrast to it's original state of being more like gum. Once the pane is in the frame and or mullion, the stops are put in on all four inside edges. The stops hold the glass and complete the frame or mullion making inside look much like outside.
So working in reverse you need to start on the inside by finding your way through decades of paint. A thin putty knife is used along the inside of the glass to loosen the stops. Focus on one of the longer edges. Once the paint cracks and you can see where seam between the stop and mullion, use the putty knife there to loosen a bit. There should be very little in the way of fasteners (finishing nails?). But they will fight you since you want to pull the stops straight out and nails will be diagonal. You may have to dig the nails out. Once you pry the first stop, out you'll have a much easier time with the others. If it gets ugly, save the pieces. You may need to get some new stops. Pine trim of a similar profile should work well. Once all the stops are out use the putty knife on the out side of the pane to separate the pane from the mullion. This is where you'll have to deal with whatever form the glazing tape is in.
My father was a carpenter and window man, so I wasn't called upon to ever do this, but in working with him and other carpenters, I've seen it done many times. I hope this is helpful.



sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast

1 edit
reply to fartness

said by fartness:

3. It's unknown whether the textured ceiling (house is from 1924) contains any asbestos, as I have not collected a sample and sent it for testing. Even if it was NOT asbestos, it would still have to be either painted over or removed somehow. Is the safest way to just put the thinnest layer of drywall on top of it and call it a day? If that would be ok and I'd sell the house in the future, how would I answer an asbestos question since I wouldn't know if I even had it in the first place, but it would be covered by drywall either way.

For question 3, I have gone over ceilings that had "stippled" textured paint on them. Easy to do. With 1/2 inch drywall already up, I covered with 1/4 3/8 inch drywall. You have to use longer drywall screws of the right length to go through all of the layers and into the ceiling joists. You also have to find and mark the location of ceiling joists in advance since you can't see them through the old drywall.

In the room where I used this technique, I also had the walls down to the studs and put new drywall on the walls to abut the new drywall I installed on the ceiling. If you are not planning to do the same, then I don't know how well that will work relative to installation and taping/mudding. Depending on the thickness of this "texturing" you have, the technique may work for you.

If you want to refresh your memory on my last project with pics where I did this, here is the link.
»Sharing pics of my recent dining room remodel project

As for future questions, answer truthfully that you are unaware of any asbestos if that is the case. If you have a responsibility to test, then test.

Edit: Corrected 1/4 inch to 3/8 inch.
--
nohup rm -fr /&


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to TheSMJ

said by TheSMJ:

said by 95688065:

said by garys_2k:

Why would GFCIs be needed other than within a certain distance of the sink?

NEC 210.8(A)(6) says all countertop receptacles need to be GFCI.

This is news to me. When I bought my house two months ago the inspector told me that only outlets within 6 feet of a water source need to be on GFCI.

Both answers could be right. It depends on what version of the NEC, your state has adopted and enforces.