dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
3258
share rss forum feed


antdude
A Ninja Ant
Premium,VIP
join:2001-03-25
United State
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable

House passes controversial "cybersecurity" bill CISPA ...

»arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2013···27-vote/

"... in 288-127 vote
Almost half of Democrats support info-sharing bill despite Obama's veto threat..."



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

2 recommendations

Re: House passes controversial "cybersecurity" bill CI

Argh!!!

All your base are data belong[s] to us!



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8

2 recommendations

reply to antdude

To paraphrase..."laws are for the little people".


Ken1943

join:2001-12-30
Denver, CO

1 recommendation

reply to antdude

People with nothing to hide don't have to be concerned. I'm sure if I wrote 'my neighbor screwed my goat' nobody would give a crap. They monitor for certain 'key' words which 99% of us don't even use.



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

1 recommendation

said by Ken1943:

They monitor for certain 'key' words which 99% of us don't even use.

Really?

»Re: Homeland Security words to avoid
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!

The Antihero

join:2002-04-09
Enola, PA
reply to Ken1943

said by Ken1943:

People with nothing to hide don't have to be concerned.

Everyone has something to hide. We're all guilty of something if you look hard enough.

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to Ken1943

said by Ken1943:

People with nothing to hide don't have to be concerned. I'm sure if I wrote 'my neighbor screwed my goat' nobody would give a crap. They monitor for certain 'key' words which 99% of us don't even use.

Why don't you share that list of words with us?


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

2 recommendations

reply to The Antihero

said by The Antihero:

We're all guilty of something if you look hard enough.

quote:
Dr. Ferris smiled. "Don't you suppose we knew it?" he said, his tone suggesting that he was letting his patent-leather hair down to impress a fellow criminal by a display of superior cunning. "We've waited a long time to get something on you. You honest men are such a problem and such a headache. But we knew you'd slip sooner or later—and this is just what we wanted."

"You seem to be pleased about it."

"Don't I have good reason to be?"

"But, after all, I did break one of your laws."

"Well, what do you think they're for?"
Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand (1957)
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!

Ken1943

join:2001-12-30
Denver, CO

3 edits

1 recommendation

reply to The Antihero

Most of us are not even in the area of concern of what they are looking at.
Come on, since 9/11 (I was there) security has really tightened up and I can understand why.

Then again, Boston proves things are not perfect.

By the way, the pictures you see of tower two coming down are much slower than seeing it happen.

If I listened to my boss, I would have been on the 20th floor of tower two repairing a telephone system. Another tech would have been installing a telephone system and a high school buddy was on a floor when tower one was hit.



siljaline
I'm lovin' that double wide
Premium
join:2002-10-12
Montreal, QC
kudos:17
Reviews:
·Bell Sympatico
reply to antdude

Some differing POV's, surely.
• »www.theverge.com/2013/4/18/42340···spa-2013
• »www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/04/us···dvocates
• »news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-57580···earches/
• »thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valle···culating
• »techcrunch.com/2013/04/18/one-ye···y-obama/
• »gizmodo.com/5994987
• »blog.sfgate.com/techchron/2013/0···e-house/
• »www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2417922,00.asp


OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to Ken1943

said by Ken1943:

Come on, since 9/11 (I was there) security has really tightened up and I can understand why.

Then again, Boston proves things are not perfect.

Then tighten thing up even more, right? Exactly as those who did it wanted...
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...

OZO
Premium
join:2003-01-17
kudos:2
reply to antdude

Here Comes 'CISPA' & Internet Censorship
--
Keep it simple, it'll become complex by itself...



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2
reply to OZO

said by OZO:

Then tighten thing up even more, right?

/sarcasm on

Not to worry. They're just trying to keep you safe. Really!

You can trust them. They're from the gummint!

/sarcasm off
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
reply to antdude

Think Obama will veto it?



dandelion
Premium,MVM
join:2003-04-29
Germantown, TN
kudos:5

1 recommendation

reply to antdude

People with nothing to hide wouldn't mind big brother in their living room either...some do. That excuse for the removal of privacy is getting old.



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

1 recommendation

reply to Ken1943

said by Ken1943:

Most of us are not even in the area of concern of what they are looking at.

Are you certain? White, fundamentally religious, owns guns, politically conservative? Isn't that the profile many are looking at for the perpetrators of the Boston Marathon bombing?
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


FF4m3

@rr.com
reply to Ken1943

said by Ken1943:

People with nothing to hide don't have to be concerned.

Why Privacy Matters Even if You Have 'Nothing to Hide' - May 15, 2011 by Daniel J. Solove:
Daniel J. Solove is a professor of law at George Washington University. This essay is an excerpt from his new book, Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff Between Privacy and Security, published this month by Yale University Press.

When the government gathers or analyzes personal information, many people say they're not worried. "I've got nothing to hide," they declare. "Only if you're doing something wrong should you worry, and then you don't deserve to keep it private."

The nothing-to-hide argument pervades discussions about privacy. The data-security expert Bruce Schneier calls it the "most common retort against privacy advocates."

The legal scholar Geoffrey Stone refers to it as an "all-too-common refrain."

In its most compelling form, it is an argument that the privacy interest is generally minimal, thus making the contest with security concerns a foreordained victory for security.

Commentators often attempt to refute the nothing-to-hide argument by pointing to things people want to hide. But the problem with the nothing-to-hide argument is the underlying assumption that privacy is about hiding bad things. By accepting this assumption, we concede far too much ground and invite an unproductive discussion about information that people would very likely want to hide.

As the computer-security specialist Schneier aptly notes, the nothing-to-hide argument stems from a faulty "premise that privacy is about hiding a wrong." Surveillance, for example, can inhibit such lawful activities as free speech, free association, and other First Amendment rights essential for democracy.

The deeper problem with the nothing-to-hide argument is that it myopically views privacy as a form of secrecy. In contrast, understanding privacy as a plurality of related issues demonstrates that the disclosure of bad things is just one among many difficulties caused by government security measures.

Another potential problem with the government's harvest of personal data is one I call exclusion. Exclusion occurs when people are prevented from having knowledge about how information about them is being used, and when they are barred from accessing and correcting errors in that data.

A related problem involves secondary use. Secondary use is the exploitation of data obtained for one purpose for an unrelated purpose without the subject's consent. How long will personal data be stored? How will the information be used? What could it be used for in the future? The potential uses of any piece of personal information are vast. Without limits on or accountability for how that information is used, it is hard for people to assess the dangers of the data's being in the government's control.

Yet another problem with government gathering and use of personal data is distortion. Although personal information can reveal quite a lot about people's personalities and activities, it often fails to reflect the whole person. It can paint a distorted picture, especially since records are reductive—they often capture information in a standardized format with many details omitted.

Those advancing the nothing-to-hide argument have in mind a particular kind of appalling privacy harm, one in which privacy is violated only when something deeply embarrassing or discrediting is revealed.

Privacy is often threatened not by a single egregious act but by the slow accretion of a series of relatively minor acts.

Privacy is rarely lost in one fell swoop. It is usually eroded over time, little bits dissolving almost imperceptibly until we finally begin to notice how much is gone.

The nothing-to-hide argument speaks to some problems but not to others. It represents a singular and narrow way of conceiving of privacy, and it wins by excluding consideration of the other problems often raised with government security measures. When engaged directly, the nothing-to-hide argument can ensnare, for it forces the debate to focus on its narrow understanding of privacy. But when confronted with the plurality of privacy problems implicated by government data collection and use beyond surveillance and disclosure, the nothing-to-hide argument, in the end, has nothing to say.

Much more at site.

Nothing to Hide:

Why should I care? I've done nothing wrong.

The definition of privacy that I like best is The right of an individual to choose what personal information is given to who and when.

Make sure you never, EVER let yourself say you have nothing to hide and if you ever hear someone else say it, slap them (or more specifically, share this page with them).

Consider that page shared with you.

Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff Between Privacy and Security

"If you've got nothing to hide," many people say, "you shouldn't worry about government surveillance." Others argue that we must sacrifice privacy for security.

In this concise and accessible book, Solove exposes the fallacies of many pro-security arguments that have skewed law and policy to favor security at the expense of privacy.

In clear, measured prose, Solove shows how the law of privacy has failed us in addressing these twin challenges, and proposes an innovative way forward.



La Luna
RIP Lisa
Premium
join:2001-07-12
Warwick, NY
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to NormanS

said by NormanS:

said by Ken1943:

Most of us are not even in the area of concern of what they are looking at.

Are you certain? White, fundamentally religious, owns guns, politically conservative? Isn't that the profile many are looking at for the perpetrators of the Boston Marathon bombing?

Nah, that's just Wolff Blitzer looking at that profile.
--
The Alien in the White House

20,588 DEADLY TERROR ATTACKS SINCE 9/11


Xioden
Premium
join:2008-06-10
Monticello, NY
kudos:1
reply to Ken1943

said by Ken1943:

Most of us are not even in the area of concern of what they are looking at.
Come on, since 9/11 (I was there) security has really tightened up and I can understand why.

Then again, Boston proves things are not perfect.

said by »www.balloon-juice.com/2013/04/15···oliticss :

I’m safe. You are safe. 99.999999% of the country is safe. But there never is a completely safe, and there never will be... I refuse to give up another right to prevent another 'Boston.' The bomber isn't the only one who wants you to be afraid. Remember that.



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
reply to La Luna

said by La Luna:

Nah, that's just Wolff Blitzer looking at that profile.

Timothy McVeigh and Eric Rudolph, among others, fit that profile. "Bob" would be foolish not to look at it.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


La Luna
RIP Lisa
Premium
join:2001-07-12
Warwick, NY
kudos:3

I forgot the .



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8

2 recommendations

reply to MaynardKrebs

said by MaynardKrebs:

Why don't you share that list of words with us?

Ummm..OK

Rewson, SAFE, Waihopai, INFOSEC, ASPIC, MI6, Information Security, SAI, Information Warfare, IW, IS, Privacy, Information Terrorism, Terrorism, Defensive Information, Defense Information Warfare, Offensive Information, Offensive Information Warfare, The Artful Dodger, NAIA, SAPM, ASU, ASTS, National Information Infrastructure, InfoSec, SAO, Reno, Compsec, JICS, Computer Terrorism, Firewalls, Secure Internet Connections, RSP, ISS, JDF, Ermes, Passwords, NAAP, DefCon V, RSO, Hackers, Encryption, ASWS, CUN, CISU, CUSI, M.A.R.E., MARE, UFO, IFO, Pacini, Angela, Espionage, USDOJ, NSA, CIA, S/Key, SSL, FBI, Secert Service, USSS, Defcon, Military, White House, Undercover, NCCS, Mayfly, PGP, SALDV, PEM, resta, RSA, Perl-RSA, MSNBC, bet, AOL, AOL TOS, CIS, CBOT, AIMSX, STARLAN, 3B2, BITNET, SAMU, COSMOS, DATTA, Furbys, E911, FCIC, HTCIA, IACIS, UT/RUS, JANET, ram, JICC, ReMOB, LEETAC, UTU, VNET, BRLO, SADCC, NSLEP, SACLANTCEN, FALN, 877, NAVELEXSYSSECENGCEN, BZ, CANSLO, CBNRC, CIDA, JAVA, rsta, Active X, Compsec 97, RENS, LLC, DERA, JIC, rip, rb, Wu, RDI, Mavricks, BIOL, Meta-hackers, ^?, SADT, Steve Case, Tools, RECCEX, Telex, Aldergrove, OTAN, monarchist, NMIC, NIOG, IDB, MID/KL, NADIS, NMI, SEIDM, BNC, CNCIS, STEEPLEBUSH, RG, BSS, DDIS, mixmaster, BCCI, BRGE, Europol, SARL, Military Intelligence, JICA, Scully, recondo, Flame, Infowar, FRU, Bubba, Freeh, Archives, ISADC, CISSP, Sundevil, jack, Investigation, JOTS, ISACA, NCSA, ASVC, spook words, RRF, 1071, Bugs Bunny, Verisign, Secure, ASIO, Lebed, ICE, NRO, Lexis-Nexis, NSCT, SCIF, FLiR, JIC, bce, Lacrosse, Flashbangs, HRT, IRA, EODG, DIA, USCOI, CID, BOP, FINCEN, FLETC, NIJ, ACC, AFSPC, BMDO, site, SASSTIXS, NAVWAN, NRL, RL, NAVWCWPNS, NSWC, USAFA, AHPCRC, ARPA, SARD, LABLINK, USACIL, SAPT, USCG, NRC, ~, O, NSA/CSS, CDC, DOE, SAAM, FMS, HPCC, NTIS, SEL, USCODE, CISE, SIRC, CIM, ISN, DJC, LLNL, bemd, SGC, UNCPCJ, CFC, SABENA, DREO, CDA, SADRS, DRA, SHAPE, bird dog, SACLANT, BECCA, DCJFTF, HALO, SC, TA SAS, Lander, GSM, T Branch, AST, SAMCOMM, HAHO, FKS, 868, GCHQ, DITSA, SORT, AMEMB, NSG, HIC, EDI, benelux, SAS, SBS, SAW, UDT, EODC, GOE, DOE, SAMF, GEO, JRB, 3P-HV, Masuda, Forte, AT, GIGN, Exon Shell, radint, MB, CQB, TECS, CONUS, CTU, RCMP, GRU, SASR, GSG-9, 22nd SAS, GEOS, EADA, SART, BBE, STEP, Echelon, Dictionary, MD2, MD4, MDA, diwn, 747, ASIC, 777, RDI, 767, MI5, 737, MI6, 757, Kh-11, EODN, SHS, ^X, Shayet-13, SADMS, Spetznaz, Recce, 707, CIO, NOCS, Halcon, NSS, Duress, RAID, Uziel, wojo, Psyops, SASCOM, grom, NSIRL, D-11, DF, ZARK, SERT, VIP, ARC, S.E.T. Team, NSWG, MP5k, SATKA, DREC, DEVGRP, DSD, FDM, GRU, LRTS, SIGDEV, NACSI, MEU/SOC,PSAC, PTT, RFI, ZL31, SIGDASYS, TDM. SUKLO, Schengen, SUSLO, TELINT, fake, TEXTA. ELF, LF, MF, Mafia, JASSM, CALCM, TLAM, Wipeout, GII, SIW, MEII, C2W, Burns, Tomlinson, Ufologico Nazionale, Centro, CICAP, MIR, Belknap, Tac, rebels, BLU-97 A/B, 007, nowhere.ch, bronze, Rubin, Arnett, BLU, SIGS, VHF, Recon, peapod, PA598D28, Spall, dort, 50MZ, 11Emc Choe, ATCOMA, UHF, The Hague, SHF, ASIO, SASP, WANK, Colonel, domestic disruption, 5ESS, smuggle, Z-200, 15kg, DUVDEVAN, RFX, nitrate, OIR, Pretoria, M-14, enigma, Bletchley Park, Clandestine, NSO, nkvd, argus, afsatcom, CQB, NVD, Counter Terrorism Security, Enemy of the State, SARA, Rapid Reaction, JSOFC3IP, Corporate Security, 192.47.242.7, Baldwin, Wilma, ie.org, cospo.osis.gov, Police, Dateline, Tyrell, KMI, 1ee, Pod, 9705, Samford Road, 20755-6000, sniper, PPS, ASIS, ASLET, TSCM, Security, Consulting, M-x spook, Z-150T, Steak Knife, High Security, Security, Evaluation, Electronic Surveillance, MI-17, ISR, NSAS, Counterterrorism, real, spies, IWO, eavesdropping, debugging, CCSS, interception, COCOT, NACSI, rhost, rhosts, ASO, SETA, Amherst, Broadside, Capricorn, NAVCM, Gamma, Gorizont, Guppy, NSS, rita, ISSO, submiss, ASDIC, .tc, 2EME REP, FID, 7NL SBS, tekka, captain, 226, .45, nonac, .li, Tony Poe, MJ-12, JASON, Society, Hmong, Majic, evil, zipgun, tax, bootleg, warez, TRV, ERV, rednoise, mindwar, nailbomb, VLF, ULF, Paperclip, Chatter, MKULTRA, MKDELTA, Bluebird, MKNAOMI, White Yankee, MKSEARCH, 355 ML, Adriatic, Goldman, Ionosphere, Mole, Keyhole, NABS, Kilderkin, Artichoke, Badger, Emerson, Tzvrif, SDIS, T2S2, STTC, DNR, NADDIS, NFLIS, CFD, BLU-114/B, quarter, Cornflower, Daisy, Egret, Iris, JSOTF, Hollyhock, Jasmine, Juile, Vinnell, B.D.M., Sphinx, Stephanie, Reflection, Spoke, Talent, Trump, FX, FXR, IMF, POCSAG, rusers, Covert Video, Intiso, r00t, lock picking, Beyond Hope, LASINT, csystems, .tm, passwd, 2600 Magazine, JUWTF, Competitor, EO, Chan, Pathfinders, SEAL Team 3, JTF, Nash, ISSAA, B61-11, Alouette, executive, Event Security, Mace, Cap-Stun, stakeout, ninja, ASIS, ISA, EOD, Oscor, Tarawa, COSMOS-2224, COSTIND, hit word, hitword, Hitwords, Regli, VBS, Leuken-Baden, number key, Zimmerwald, DDPS, GRS, AGT. AMME, ANDVT, Type I, Type II, VFCT, VGPL, WHCA, WSA, WSP, WWABNCP, ZNI1, FSK, FTS2000, GOSIP, GOTS, SACS STU-III, PRF, PMSP, PCMT, I&A, JRSC, ITSDN, Keyer, KG-84C, KWT-46, KWR-46, KY-75, KYV-5, LHR, PARKHILL, LDMX, LEASAT, SNS, SVN, TACSAT, TRANSEC, DONCAF, EAM, DSCS, DSNET1, DSNET2, DSNET3, ECCM, EIP, EKMS, EKMC, DDN, DDP, Merlin, NTT, SL-1, Rolm, TIE, Tie-fighter, PBX, SLI, NTT, MSCJ, MIT, 69, RIT, Time, MSEE, Cable & Wireless, CSE, SUW, J2, Embassy, ETA, Porno, Fax, finks, Fax encryption, white noise, Fernspah, MYK, GAFE, forecast, import, rain, tiger, buzzer, N9, pink noise, CRA, M.P.R.I., top secret, Mossberg, 50BMG, Macintosh Security, Macintosh Internet Security, OC3, Macintosh Firewalls, Unix Security, VIP Protection, SIG, sweep, Medco, TRD, TDR, Z, sweeping, SURSAT, 5926, TELINT, Audiotel, Harvard, 1080H, SWS, Asset, Satellite imagery, force, NAIAG, Cypherpunks, NARF, 127, Coderpunks, TRW, remailers, replay, redheads, RX-7, explicit, FLAME, J-6, Pornstars, AVN, Playboy, ISSSP, Anonymous, W, Sex, chaining, codes, Nuclear, 20, subversives, SLIP, toad, fish, data havens, unix, c, a, b, d, SUBACS, the, Elvis, quiche, DES, 1*, N-ISDN, NLSP, OTAR, OTAT, OTCIXS, MISSI, MOSAIC, NAVCOMPARS, NCTS, NESP, MILSATCOM, AUTODIN, BLACKER, C3I, C4I, CMS, CMW, CP, SBU, SCCN, SITOR, SHF/DOD, Finksburg MD, Link 16, LATA, NATIA, NATOA, sneakers, UXO, (), OC-12, counterintelligence, Shaldag, sport, NASA, TWA, DT, gtegsc, nowhere, .ch, hope, emc, industrial espionage, SUPIR, PI, TSCI, spookwords, industrial intelligence, H.N.P., SUAEWICS, Juiliett Class Submarine, Locks, qrss, loch, 64 Vauxhall Cross, Ingram Mac-10, wwics, sigvoice, ssa, E.O.D., SEMTEX, penrep, racal, OTP, OSS, Siemens, RPC, Met, CIA-DST, INI, watchers, keebler, contacts, Blowpipe, BTM, CCS, GSA, Kilo Class, squib, primacord, RSP, Z7, Becker, Nerd, fangs, Austin, no|d, Comirex, GPMG, Speakeasy, humint, GEODSS, SORO, M5, BROMURE, ANC, zone, SBI, DSS, S.A.I.C., Minox, Keyhole, SAR, Rand Corporation, Starr, Wackenhutt, EO, burhop, Wackendude, mol, Shelton, 2E781, F-22, 2010, JCET, cocaine, Vale, IG, Kosovo, Dake, 36,800, Hillal, Pesec, Hindawi, GGL, NAICC, CTU, botux, Virii, CCC, ISPE, CCSC, Scud, SecDef, Magdeyev, VOA, Kosiura, Small Pox, Tajik, +=, Blacklisted 411, TRDL, Internet Underground, BX, XS4ALL, wetsu, muezzin, Retinal Fetish, WIR, Fetish, FCA, Yobie, forschung, emm, ANZUS, Reprieve, NZC-332, edition, cards, mania, 701, CTP, CATO, Phon-e, Chicago Posse, NSDM, l0ck, beanpole, spook, keywords, QRR, PLA, TDYC, W3, CUD, CdC, Weekly World News, Zen, World Domination, Dead, GRU, M72750, Salsa, 7, Blowfish, Gorelick, Glock, Ft. Meade, NSWT, press-release, WISDIM, burned, Indigo, wire transfer, e-cash, Bubba the Love Sponge, Enforcers, Digicash, zip, SWAT, Ortega, PPP, NACSE, crypto-anarchy, AT&T, SGI, SUN, MCI, Blacknet, ISM, JCE, Middleman, KLM, Blackbird, NSV, GQ360, X400, Texas, jihad, SDI, BRIGAND, Uzi, Fort Meade, *&, gchq.gov.uk, supercomputer, bullion, 3, NTTC, Blackmednet, :, Propaganda, ABC, Satellite phones, IWIS, Planet-1, ISTA, rs9512c, Jiang Zemin, South Africa, Sergeyev, Montenegro, Toeffler, Rebollo, sorot, Yucca Mountain, FARC, Toth, Xu Yongyue, Bach, Razor, AC, cryptanalysis, nuclear, 52 52 N - 03 03 W, Morgan, Canine, GEBA, INSCOM, MEMEX, Stanley, FBI, Panama, fissionable, Sears Tower, NORAD, Delta Force, SEAL, virtual, WASS, WID, Dolch, secure shell, screws, Black-Ops, O/S, Area51, SABC, basement, ISWG, $@, data-haven, NSDD, black-bag, rack, TEMPEST, Goodwin, rebels, ID, MD5, IDEA, garbage, market, beef, Stego, ISAF, unclassified, Sayeret Tzanhanim, PARASAR, Gripan, pirg, curly, Taiwan, guest, utopia, NSG, orthodox, CCSQ, Alica, SHA, Global, gorilla, Bob, UNSCOM, Fukuyama, Manfurov, Kvashnin, Marx, Abdurahmon, snullen, Pseudonyms, MITM, NARF, Gray Data, VLSI, mega, Leitrim, Yakima, NSES, Sugar Grove, WAS, Cowboy, Gist, 8182, Gatt, Platform, 1911, Geraldton, UKUSA, veggie, XM, Parvus, NAVSVS, 3848, Morwenstow, Consul, Oratory, Pine Gap, Menwith, Mantis, DSD, BVD, 1984, blow out, BUDS, WQC, Flintlock, PABX, Electron, Chicago Crust, e95, DDR&E, 3M, KEDO, iButton, R1, erco, Toffler, FAS, RHL, K3, Visa/BCC, SNT, Ceridian, STE, condor, CipherTAC-2000, Etacs, Shipiro, ssor, piz, fritz, KY, 32, Edens, Kiwis, Kamumaruha, DODIG, Firefly, HRM, Albright, Bellcore, rail, csim, NMS, 2c, FIPS140-1, CAVE, E-Bomb, CDMA, Fortezza, 355ml, ISSC, cybercash, NAWAS, government, NSY, hate, speedbump, joe, illuminati, BOSS, Kourou, Misawa, Morse, HF, P415, ladylove, filofax, Gulf, lamma, Unit 5707, Sayeret Mat'Kal, Unit 669, Sayeret Golani, Lanceros, Summercon, NSADS, president, ISFR, freedom, ISSO, walburn, Defcon VI, DC6, Larson, P99, HERF pipe-bomb, 2.3 Oz., cocaine, $, imapct, Roswell, ESN, COS, E.T., credit card, b9, fraud, ST1, assasinate, virus, ISCS, ISPR, anarchy, rogue, mailbomb, 888, Chelsea, 1997, Whitewater, MOD, York, plutonium, William Gates, clone, BATF, SGDN, Nike, WWSV, Atlas, IWWSVCS, Delta, TWA, Kiwi, PGP 2.6.2., PGP 5.0i, PGP 5.1, siliconpimp, SASSTIXS, IWG, Lynch, 414, Face, Pixar, IRIDF, NSRB, eternity server, Skytel, Yukon, Templeton, Johohonbu, LUK, Cohiba, Soros, Standford, niche, ISEP, ISEC, 51, H&K, USP, ^, sardine, bank, EUB, USP, PCS, NRO, Red Cell, NSOF, DC7, Glock 26,
snuffle, Patel, package, ISI, INR, INS, GRU, RUOP, GSS, NSP, SRI, Ronco, Armani, BOSS, Chobetsu, FBIS, BND, SISDE, FSB, BfV, IB, froglegs, JITEM, SADF, advise, TUSA, LITE, PKK, HoHoCon, SISMI, ISG, FIS, MSW, Spyderco, UOP, SSCI, NIMA, HAMASMOIS, SVR, SIN, advisors, SAP, Monica, OAU, PFS, Aladdin, AG, chameleon man, Hutsul, CESID, Bess, rail gun, .375, Peering, CSC, Tangimoana Beach, Commecen, Vanuatu, Kwajalein, LHI, DRM, GSGI, DST, MITI, JERTO, SDF, Koancho, Blenheim, Rivera, Kyudanki, varon, 310, 17, 312, NB, CBM, CTP, Sardine, SBIRS, jaws, SGDN, ADIU, DEADBEEF, IDP, IDF, Halibut, SONANGOL, Flu, &, Loin, PGP 5.53, meta, Faber, SFPD, EG&G, ISEP, blackjack, Fox, Aum, AIEWS, AMW, RHL, Baranyi, WORM, MP5K-SD, 1071, WINGS, cdi, VIA, DynCorp, UXO, Ti, WWSP, WID, osco, Mary, honor, Templar, THAAD, package, CISD, ISG, BIOLWPN, JRA, ISB, ISDS, chosen, LBSD, van, schloss, secops, DCSS, DPSD, LIF, J-Star, PRIME, SURVIAC, telex, Analyzer, embassy, Golf, B61-7, Maple, Tokyo, ERR, SBU, Threat, JPL, Tess, SE, Alex, EPL, SPINTCOM, FOUO, ISS-ADP, Merv, Mexico, SUR, blocks, SO13, Rojdykarna, RSOC, USS Banner, S511, 20755, airframe, jya.com, Furby, PECSENC, football, Agfa, 3210, Crowell, moore, 510, OADR, Smith, toffee, FIS, N5P6, EuroFed, SP4, shelter, Crypto, AG, Croatian, nuclear, FBI, colonel, plutonium, Ortega Waco, Texas, Panama, CIA, DES, jihad, fissionable, quiche, terrorist, World Trade Center, assassination, DES, NORAD, Delta Force, SDI, explosion, Serbian, Panama, Uzi, Ft. Meade, SEAL Team 6, Honduras, PLO, NSA, terrorist, Ft. Meade, strategic supercomputer, $400 million in gold bullion, quiche, Honduras, BATF, colonel, Treasury, domestic disruption, class struggle, smuggle, M55, M51, Physical Security Division Room 2A0120, OPS 2A building, 688-6911(b), 963-3371(s). Security Awareness Division (M56) Field Security Division (M52), Al Amn al-Askari Supreme Assembly of the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SAIRI), Binnenlandse Veiligheidsdienst Komitet Gosudarstvennoi Bezopasnosti, Federalnaia sluzhba besopasnosti, GCHQ, MI5, Kill, the president.
--
No amount of force can control a free man, a man whose mind is free. You can't conquer a free man; the most you can do is kill him. Well, you can try to...



chrisretusn
Retired
Premium
join:2007-08-13
Philippines
kudos:1
Reviews:
·PLDT
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to antdude

The bill still has to get through the Senate. If anyone cares about it, you can read the bill and decide for your self what is in it. I know that is a novel concept, read the bill.

My congressman introduced this bill, that does not mean I support it or do not support it.

»www.opencongress.org/bill/113-h624/text
--
Chris
Living in Paradise!!


oldmike

join:2005-04-14
Latonia, KY

1 recommendation

reply to antdude

I was already worried before reading the entire bill. After reading it twice, making notes, and studying parts of it closely... We are so screwed. Passive surveillance is near universal. Almost anything can be used to justify (if justification is even needed) active surveillance. Combine this with Patriot I and II.... I do not see how we are going to survive as a free country. Dammit, 1984 was a warning, not a blueprint!

I love the "I have nothing to hide" crowd. Happily oblivious to the fact that someone else, making up rules as they go, backed by governmental authority and weapons, will decide what's OK or not. What's OK today may or may not be OK tomorrow, depending on forces and circumstances unknown, and unaccountable in any way to the very citizens they are supposed to protect.



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

2 edits

2 recommendations

said by oldmike:

Dammit, 1984 was a warning, not a blueprint!

True. George Orwell showed what might happen. The technology didn't exist when he wrote that book. It does now.

That said a gummint needs some justification to bring about such a society. In "1984" it was war. Today it is terrorism.

I fully expect, after the recent events in Boston, to see more calls for increased surveillance, monitoring etc. The "just keep me safe" crowd will demand it.

PS: The one thing the "just keep me safe" proponents can't seem to keep in context is the level of actual danger from terrorism. Of course terrorist acts can be horrific but the number of deaths is far less than common accidents (e.g. car crashes etc). Why aren't there calls to ban vehicles? For one thing terrorism, by its nature and intent, scares people. Politicians overreact and/or see incidents as a way to increase their power. Expect it to continue.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


Kristopher
Tarquin
Premium
join:2002-10-11
Tyrinaria
kudos:4
reply to John Galt

Sorry, I had to laugh at "joe".



NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:11
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
reply to StuartMW

said by StuartMW:

I fully expect, after the recent events in Boston, to see more calls for increased surveillance, monitoring etc. The "just keep me safe" crowd will demand it.

»tv.msnbc.com/2013/04/17/how-the-···igators/

"If I am not doing evil things with my gunpowder, I have nothing to fear!"

Through security clearances, background checks, and answering to false allegations of criminal acts, I am so entangled in the grid I have no glimmer of hope of privacy. I feel like I am caught in a rip, and will never make it to shore. Maybe it will be easier to just "go with the flow" than to "swim against the tide".
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

1 recommendation

said by NormanS:

I am so entangled in the grid I have no glimmer of hope of privacy.

Well I wouldn't take it personally.

Everyone is a suspect these days. It doesn't matter where you were born, what color you are, your religion or whatever. We're all potentially a threat and will be dealt with accordingly (i.e. monitored 24/7/365).

Just as in totalitarian societies everyone will perceive everyone else as a possible threat. Sorry but that's where we're headed.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL

said by StuartMW:

Just as in totalitarian societies everyone will perceive everyone else as a possible threat. Sorry but that's where we are.

;)
--
The talented hawk speaks French.


javaMan
The Dude abides.
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-15
San Luis Obispo, CA

1 edit

4 recommendations

reply to Ken1943

said by Ken1943:

People with nothing to hide don't have to be concerned. I'm sure if I wrote 'my neighbor screwed my goat' nobody would give a crap. They monitor for certain 'key' words which 99% of us don't even use.

What they monitor isn't really the issue. And it isn't even an issue about whether you need to hide anything. It's about whether someone, in some official capacity, decides that what you say or think or do makes you someone worth watching and listening to in their eyes.

I don't know how old you are but I was around in the 60's when the FBI et.al. decided that what hundreds and thousands of people thought was dangerous. They compiled lists and files, eavesdropped, broke into homes and businesses and in general ran roughshod over the rights of its citizens. It is now 50 years later and the technological advances make the capabilities of those days pale in comparison. Further, we are now in a situation where the government not only condones this kind of action but endorses it.

You may not have anything to hide but I assure you, you have something to fear. Whether you understand it or not.
--
Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; that put darkness for light, and light for darkness. . . Isa. 5:20