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JimThePCGuy
Formerly known as schja01.
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-27
Morton Grove, IL

What kind of weather feature is this?

Click for full size
I caught this on the Moline Nexrad off Accuweather's site. I thought it might be an anomaly but it shows up on the Chicago IL, Springfield, IL and Milwaukee, WI Nexrad sites too. Kind of reminds me of that cloud on a Star Trek Movie that captured Capt. Kirk. I don't think it is a squall line as it is behind the cold front.
Is there a name for this kind of precipitation event?
The image is animated so be sure to click on it.
Thanks,
J


J E F F
Whatta Ya Think About Dat?
Premium
join:2004-04-01
Kitchener, ON
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Rogers Portable ..
Well, whatever they're called, it causes some tornado's in Ontario, Canada on Thursday. That line went just north of me, so it wasn't too intense, but 30 miles north it was bad. I believe that type of frontal line usually does goes severe weather like tornados.
--
If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. - Albert Einstein


mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3
reply to JimThePCGuy


I believe that is what is simply called a "thin line" of thunderstorms. Generally they form on the leading edge of a cold front, and will sometimes be associated with what is called an "outflow line", which is a narrow, moving line that appears on the radar, but has no rainfall with it. It is just cold air down-flowing ahead of the front, and it is dense enough to show up on radar.


JimThePCGuy
Formerly known as schja01.
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-27
Morton Grove, IL
reply to JimThePCGuy
Thanks all. Much appreciated.
J


jeffchap
Premium
join:2005-02-26
Edmond, OK
reply to JimThePCGuy
Here in Oklahoma, they are commonly called a 'squall line'.


Trihexagonal

join:2004-08-29
US
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·AT&T Midwest

3 edits
reply to JimThePCGuy
Click for full size
Click for full size
I live in that region and just happened to catch a couple interesting weather radar screenshots the same day, April 18th, about 3.5 hours after your shot. It looks like you can see the same line of clouds in the upper portion of the large image. Tornado warnings were out and a couple semi-trucks had been blown over on their sides just a few miles up the highway.

I take it the circles are radar stations in the area, but they were what prompted me to save the shots.


SmokChsr
Who let the magic smoke out?
Premium
join:2006-03-17
Saint Augustine, FL
Yes, the circles are radar sites. They typically occur when there is very high humidity, or other atmospheric anomalies that cause a slight reflection back to the radar. It's also known as clutter.


EGeezer
zichrona livracha
Premium
join:2002-08-04
Midwest
kudos:8
reply to JimThePCGuy
Looks like a squall line with a gust front. Some of those small bows in the line indicate some relatively strong straight line winds.
--
Buckle Up. It makes it harder for the aliens to suck you out of your car.

Ky Nutcase

join:2003-03-03
Morganfield, KY
reply to JimThePCGuy
I was told by a friend at NWS in Paducah that the "donuts" shown by Trihexagonal are caused by the NWS offices having the gain on the radars turned up higher to catch wind disturbances easer.

It may just be a company line as I don't see why Birmingham, South Georgia and those sites would be "cranked up"