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bevills1

join:2006-05-29
Reviews:
·Charter

Win2k Problems with SATA Burner

Recently I got a SYBA SD-SATA-4P PCI card with SIL3114 chupset for my PC, and everything works fine in Win2k with SATA hard drive connected. However, I get "Stop: 0X0000001E(0XC0000005,0XEB0717A6,0X00000000,0X00000028) KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED" just after the Windows 2000 Professional screen while booting when SATA burner is attached. This is on a multi-boot system with Win98SE and WinXP plus Win2k. Both WinXP and Win98SE boot fine with hard drive and SATA burner connected. SIL3114 drivers were installed for all 3 Windows versions before before attaching any SATA drive.

WinXP required a repair install before it would boot even to the hard drive, and I thought repair install may be the solution for Win2k. However, the same error is given after the first restart during repair install. I then had to restore a recent backup image of C drive to be able to boot to Win98SE or WinXP because it kept trying that repair install restart with no boot menu to select.

Is Win2k incompatible with SATA adapter cards, or is there a solution for this problem? Another option I considered is to do a limited and separate WinXP install to replace the Win2k install. Would WinXP need to be activated again if a separate install were done, and are there any problems with having 2 separate WinXP installs?

Gem
Premium
join:2005-09-10
kudos:4

3 edits
As to the windows XP activation question. If you reinstall of XP you will be asked to reactivate XP.

bevills1

join:2006-05-29
Reviews:
·Charter
I finally figured out what the cause of the problem was when I tried to a Win2k repair install. For some unknown reason the Win2k install disk was seeing the current Win2k installation on a different drive letter than where it was originally installed, and Win2k was probably looking for it on the original drive letter when it was trying to load. I've no idea what may have caused this odd behavior. Also it's odd that WinXP stilll recognized correct drive for Win2k already installed while Win98SE recognized original Win2k install on the different drive just as Win2k Setup did. Go figure!

Anyway the problem was finally fixed by first deleting some partitions, then recreating them to get Win2k to see its target partition as the correct drive letter, and finally doing a fresh Win2k install. This fixed all Win2k issues, and all SATA drives are now correctly recognized.

However, WinXP would not boot after that because in multi-boot Windows systems the OSs must be installed from oldest, next to oldest to newest as some may know and others may not know. I then tried a WinXP repair install which would not complete because it asked for the timntr_2k.sys file which couldn't be located. Some google searches revealed that file is part of Acronis, and suggested solution was to install Acronis to get the file which worked for the guy who was seeking it. This is even more strange because Acronis was never installed on the system, and I don't even have the Acronis program. A fresh install of WinXP fixed this problem, and a recent WinXP backup image was restored which resulted in everything back to normal in a short time. It probably wasn't necessary to go into as much detail on the resolution to problems, but maybe it may help someone else who experiences these any of these issues.

Gem
Premium
join:2005-09-10
kudos:4
Reviews:
·CableOne
Thanks for the insights into how you solved the problem. Those of us still using older operating systems will benefit from your detailed explanations.

BTW, you might want to consider multi-booting with a different physical hard drive for each OS. That way you use the bios rather than a boot loader to determine which one to boot. I've found that makes it easier to repair or reinstall a faulty operating system that way, too.

Aranarth

join:2011-11-04
Stanwood, MI
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

1 recommendation

I would also agree.

I used to have a "cold" swap bay with multiple spare cartridges. It was ide only and would only do sata 100 rather than 133 but still fast enough.

In any case, with the bios set to autodetect I could shut the machine down, swap the boot drive, and then fire the machine backup and it would boot to win3.1, win98se, nt4.0, win2k, and xp. Having a bunch of spare drives from 800mb to 160gig helped as well. The machine had a 250gig internal drive split between a 80gig fat32 partition and 170 gig ntfs partition for user files.

I used this setup to play games for different versions of windows and run finicky software.

These days I can just fire up different virtual machines but I haven't done that in months...

bevills1

join:2006-05-29
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to Gem
Many may scoff at use of older systems and even criticize those who use them, but I've found them to be quite useful at times. In the resolution to problems posted in this thread the partition that Win2k had been on was unable to be removed by WinXP which gave the message "partition cannot be deleted" when I attempted to delete it from WinXP. However, using fdisk from Win98SE removed it with no problem. One never knows when or how an older OS will prove useful, but I'm glad I've kept them and wonder how or even if that partition could have been deleted otherwise.

Gem
Premium
join:2005-09-10
kudos:4
Reviews:
·CableOne
Yoo hoo! Another vintage computer user. They work well for many of us, yours truly included.

As to deleting the W2K partition with XP, did you try deleting that volume in XP's Computer Management/Disk Management tool? I'd guess that would work. It's what I use to eliminate unwanted partitions on XP hard drives.