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34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

1 recommendation

reply to PapaMidnight

Re: IPv6 Router Comptability

said by PapaMidnight:

The problem is many consumer routers do not support IPv6. Even those who pfSense, like myself, don't have IPv6 compatibility out the box.

To that point, many devices which support third-party firmware such as DD-WRT and Tomato lack the necessary ROM space to support IPv6.

More or less every router from the major brands out of the box supports IPv6 now and a lot of the older stuff has firmware upgrades to add support too. pfSense has IPv6 support with their 2.1 release.

Hardware that does not have the ROM space is already at the end of its lifespan or has already passed it. Hardware will be replaced over time with refreshes.

The idea is to roll it out on the network side and have more and more users become v6 enabled as time goes on and that will happen.


PapaMidnight

join:2009-01-13
Baltimore, MD

1 recommendation

2.1 is not presently stable; and while it is possible that those devices have reached their EoL, many a consumer likely recently (within the past two years) purchased a Wireless-N consumer router with no IPv6 support.

I also doubt that the average consumer knows what IPv6 (or v4 for that matter) even is. To them, they have perfectly functional devices with no incentive to upgrade.

Since these have ben EoL'd, there is no further development of firmware either by the first party (and these routers, more often than not, do not support an IPv6 capable version of dd-wrt or tomato); and I'm certainly not going to try to tell the average internet user how to switch over to DD-WRT, or convince them they need to spend money preliminarily with a new wifi spec on the horizon and their device is still operational.

Therefore, while it indeed may be the case that newer routers are available with IPv6, the sheer proliferation of IPv4 devices that lack IPv6 support (many of which are still stocked, priced low, and more likely for a consumer to buy at $49.99 than a new model at $89.99) makes deployment en mass difficult without direct ISP intervention or a concerted effort from device manufacturers to deploy firmware updates to older devices (Especially Linksys whose older firmware is riddled with known security holes that remain unpatched).

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
You just ignored most of what I said and kept blabbering on.


PapaMidnight

join:2009-01-13
Baltimore, MD
Actually, I addressed every single point. I also provided real-world rationale for why your reasoning is not effective.

You chose to see it as a tl;dr and consider it "blabbering" - but to each their own.