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pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL

Dual Stack IPv4/IPv6 with U-Verse

Hey folks,

I'm using AT&T U-Verse, and I have the 2-Wire 3600HGV router/access point/firewall/switch device. I'm interested in setting up my IPv4 network to use both IPv4 and IPv6.

Right now, besides the 2-Wire device, I have a Linksys WRT54GL v1.1 running vanilla Tomato v1.28, and it's configured as the "DMZPlus mode" device in the 2-Wire. So, that's my actual router / NAT device.

I also have an Asus RT-16N running DD-WRT v24-sp2 (08/07/10) mini, which I'm using solely as an Access Point, but I would be interested in using it as an IPv6 router, if it works better than the Linksys WRT54GL v1.1.

Any ideas on where to get started? I have lots of questions:

Does AT&T issue IPv6 addresses?
Will I get public IPv6 addresses for all of my internal devices?
Is there a firmware I can use on either my Linksys or Asus device to do dual stack?

Cheers,
Trevor Sullivan
»twitter.com/pcgeek86


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

1 recommendation

said by pcgeek86:

Does AT&T issue IPv6 addresses?

I believe AT&T's plan is to deploy CGN (Carrier Grade NAT). For as long as I was with them (through April, 2011), I never knew them to offer a block of IPv6 to residential customers.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

paul248

join:2001-09-04

1 recommendation

AT&T is currently the world's largest IPv6 ISP, with 8% of their users running the protocol:

»www.worldipv6launch.org/measurements/

I think it's all based on 6rd tunneling though.


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12

3 edits

1 recommendation

reply to pcgeek86
I've been running IPv6 with AT&T for a bit over a year now.

There's a lot of stuff in this thread, but at 6 pages long it's kinda long to dig through. The highlights are:

AT&T uses 6rd, not dual stack.
For every IPv4 address you have you get a /60
The 6rd border router is at 12.83.49.81
Take your IPv4 address, convert it to hexadecimal, shift it 1 nibble to the left (adding a zero on the right), and throw "2602:30" in front of it. This is your /60.
I.e. 2602:30w:wxxy:yzz0:: (the ww xx yy zz are your IPv4 address parts converted to hex)
Change your MTU to 1480 on the tunnel interface and in your LAN router advertisements or you'll be hurting! (path MTU discovery is completely broken on AT&T's network)

I forgot what router software this was originally for, but one script to get it set up is:
V6PREFIX="$(printf '%02X%02X%02X%02X' $(echo $WANIP | tr '.' ' ') | awk '{print "2602:30" substr($1,1,1) ":" substr($1,2,4) ":" substr($1,6) "0"}')"
 
ip tunnel add tun6rd mode sit local $WANIP ttl 64
ip link set tun6rd mtu 1480
ip link set tun6rd up
ip addr add $V6PREFIX::1/28 dev tun6rd
ip addr add ::$WANIP/128 dev tun6rd
ip addr add $V6PREFIX::1/64 dev br0
ip route add ::12.83.49.81 dev tun6rd
ip route add ::/0 via ::12.83.49.81 dev tun6rd
 

On my (6rd-patched) CentOS box, I'm using:
ip tunnel add 6rd0 mode sit local $WANIP ttl 64
ip tunnel 6rd dev 6rd0 6rd-prefix 2602:0300::/28
ip link set 6rd0 up
ip -6 addr add $V6PREFIX::1/60 dev 6rd0
ip route add ::12.83.49.81 dev 6rd0
ip route add ::/0 via ::12.83.49.81 dev 6rd0
ifconfig 6rd0 mtu 1480
 

Edit again: I forgot to mention, although 2602:30w:wxxy:yzz0::1/60 is added to my 6rd0 interface (to handle incoming packets from the internet),
2602:30w:wxxy:yzz0::1/64 through
2602:30w:wxxy:yzzF::1/64 are added to the various ethN LAN interfaces.

/M


pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL

2 edits

1 recommendation

This is great information to start with, guys! Thanks a lot.

I will certainly do some research into 6rd, which I'm not yet familiar with. It sounds like /60 block will be a very large number of publicly routable IP addresses.

Are you literally saying that, for every public IPv4 address you have from AT&T, you're getting 295,147,905,179,352,825,856 IPv6 addresses (a /60)? That's freaking incredible!

The part I'm still struggling with is:

* What hardware should I use for a router at home? Can I use my Linksys WRT54GL or Asus RT-16N, or should I look at using m0n0wall? Or is there another device you would recommend?
* Depending on the device ... what firmware will support 6rd, as well as other IPv6 scenarios (eg. Comcast, Verizon FIOS, etc)?
* Will AT&T ever offer native "dual stack" capability?
* How does 6rd differ from native dual stack?
* How do I ensure that my clients behind my router can be provisioned a publicly routable IPv6 address? That's the goal, right?

Although I'm in the IT field, I'm in the systems management space (not networking), and am admittedly not very well versed with IPv6. It would be nice if there were an introductory guide for home users, or even people like me who are highly technical, but still new to IPv6. I'd be more than happy to put that together, if I understood the technology, but I'm kinda in learning mode at this point.

I would really like to come up with a solution that will allow IPv4 and IPv6 coexist internally. I have the following devices on my network:

* Windows clients and servers
* Android tablet
* Android phone
* Sonos audio system (not sure if IPv6 aware, but I can ignore this for now)

Okay, you know what, in the interest of increasing my understanding, let's start with the most simple example: if I directly connected a Windows computer to my 2Wire device, with DMZplus Mode, how could I configure it to get an IPv4 (my single, public IPv4 from U-Verse), and an IPv6 address? Does the 6rd border router send out Router Advertisements (RA) to dynamically provision IP addresses? Am I even using the right terminology?


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12

1 recommendation

said by pcgeek86:

Are you literally saying that, for every public IPv4 address you have from AT&T, you're getting 295,147,905,179,352,825,856 IPv6 addresses (a /60)? That's freaking incredible!

The part I'm still struggling with is:

* What hardware should I use for a router at home? Can I use my Linksys WRT54GL or Asus RT-16N, or should I look at using m0n0wall? Or is there another device you would recommend?
* Depending on the device ... what firmware will support 6rd, as well as other IPv6 scenarios (eg. Comcast, Verizon FIOS, etc)?

Yup, 2^68 addresses. However, due to how auto-configuration works (and IPv6 best practices in general), every network/subnet gets a /64 (or 2^64 addresses).

I'm not too sure about the hardware. I do know dd-wrt and OpenWRT support it however.

Anything that supports AT&T's 6rd should also support Comcast no problem. VZ is unknown at this point as they have not even started rolling it out and thus we have no idea what they'll use.

said by pcgeek86:

* Will AT&T ever offer native "dual stack" capability?
* How does 6rd differ from native dual stack?
* How do I ensure that my clients behind my router can be provisioned a publicly routable IPv6 address? That's the goal, right?

They claim native dual stack to be their end goal, but there have been absolutely no signs of movement on that front.

6rd is IPv6 tunneled over a IPv4 network. It's actually just a special case of 6in4 and 6to4.

The router takes care of "unwrapping" the tunneled packets. Thus, as far as the devices on your LAN are concerned, it's native dual stack on your LAN.

said by pcgeek86:

Okay, you know what, in the interest of increasing my understanding, let's start with the most simple example: if I directly connected a Windows computer to my 2Wire device, with DMZplus Mode, how could I configure it to get an IPv4 (my single, public IPv4 from U-Verse), and an IPv6 address? Does the 6rd border router send out Router Advertisements (RA) to dynamically provision IP addresses? Am I even using the right terminology?

Actually, that may be one of the more complex examples. I don't know if Windoze even supports 6rd... The BR does not send out RA's; it must be manually configured.

The simplest would be IPDSL/ADSL2+ with a Motorola NVG510 router/gateway (instead of the 2wire) - just plug it in and turn it on

/M


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12
I guess the simplest would be dd-wrt. The config example at »www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/IPv6#6rd is wrong for AT&T however. You should be able to just drop this one in:
insmod /lib/modules/`uname -r`/kernel/net/ipv6/sit.ko
sleep 5 
HOST6RD="12.83.49.81"
WANIP="$(ifconfig vlan2 | sed -n '/inet /{s/.*addr://;s/ .*;p}')"
if [ -n "$WANIP" ]
then 
V6PREFIX="$(printf '%02X%02X%02X%02X' $(echo $WANIP | tr '.' ' ') | awk '{print "2602:30" substr($1,1,1) ":" substr($1,2,4) ":" substr($1,6) "0"}')"
ip tunnel add tun6rd mode sit ttl 255 remote any local $WANIP
 
ip link set tun6rd mtu 1480
ip link set tun6rd up
ip addr add $V6PREFIX::1/28 dev tun6rd
ip addr add ::$WANIP/128 dev tun6rd
ip addr add $V6PREFIX::1/64 dev br0
ip -6 route add 2000::/3 via ::$HOST6RD dev tun6rd
kill -HUP $(cat /var/run/radvd.pid)
fi
echo "interface br0 { \
MinRtrAdvInterval 3; MaxRtrAdvInterval 10; AdvLinkMTU 1480; AdvSendAdvert on; \
prefix $V6PREFIX::/64 { AdvOnLink on; AdvAutonomous on; AdvValidLifetime 86400; \
AdvPreferredLifetime 86400; }; };" \
> /tmp/radvd.conf
radvd -C /tmp/radvd.conf start
 

/M


pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL

1 recommendation

reply to mackey
Great information, once again!

said by mackey :

The router takes care of "unwrapping" the tunneled packets. Thus, as far as the devices on your LAN are concerned, it's native dual stack on your LAN.

So how do you make your internal clients get public IPv6 addresses? Does 6rd essentially provision a block of IPv6 addresses to your router (Customer Equipment / CE), and then clients send DHCPv6 requests to the router, to get one from that block?

said by mackey :

Actually, that may be one of the more complex examples. I don't know if Windoze even supports 6rd...The BR does not send out RA's; it must be manually configured.

The simplest would be IPDSL/ADSL2+ with a Motorola NVG510 router/gateway (instead of the 2wire) - just plug it in and turn it on

Well, the most simple example probably isn't the best idea, since I haven't got a Motorola NVG510, and it appears to have terrible reviews, which means I probably wouldn't be interested in getting one. I'm really curious to know if this will all work over the 2Wire 3600HGV, since after all, 6rd is done over IPv4, as it is an extension of 6to4.

I found a couple of articles that are very helpful in increasing my understanding of 6rd:

»tuketu.wordpress.com/2010/04/20/···comcast/

»tuketu.wordpress.com/2010/05/11/···eriment/

[PDF Warning] »www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios-xml···s-xe.pdf


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12

1 edit

1 recommendation

said by pcgeek86:

So how do you make your internal clients get public IPv6 addresses? Does 6rd essentially provision a block of IPv6 addresses to your router (Customer Equipment / CE), and then clients send DHCPv6 requests to the router, to get one from that block?

Yup, that's pretty much it. You can set your router to broadcast RAs instead of doing DHCP if you want (that's what I do).

said by pcgeek86:

Well, the most simple example probably isn't the best idea, since I haven't got a Motorola NVG510, and it appears to have terrible reviews, which means I probably wouldn't be interested in getting one. I'm really curious to know if this will all work over the 2Wire 3600HGV, since after all, 6rd is done over IPv4, as it is an extension of 6to4.

Well, you actually couldn't use the NVG510 even if you wanted to - since you have a 3600HGV now, that means you're on the FTTN VDSL system; the NVG510 is for the FTTCO ADSL2+ flavor of Uverse (a completely different system). I have the NVG510 as I'm on the ADSL2+ Uverse system, and I absolutely love it! That's because I have a static IP block - unlike the 2Wire's, the NVG510 can hand the entire block off to your router to do whatever with, no "bridge-like mode" shenanigans required. The NVG510 haters don't have said static block and I've heard its "bridge-like mode" is horrendous. It is rootable however which is a huge plus.

Since you said you have your 2Wire in "DMZPlus mode" it should work. If I'm remembering yesterdays' search hits in AT&T's official forum correctly, it reportedly works just fine.

To list AT&T's 6rd configuration using the terminology in your linked article,
1) 6rdPrefix is 2602:0300::
2) 6rdPrefixLen is 28
3) IPv4MaskLen is 32
4) 6rdBRIPv4Address is 12.83.49.81

/M


wizkid6

join:2002-03-31
Opelika, AL
said by mackey:

the FTTCO ADSL2+ flavor

LOL. That's a new one for me. ROFL.

I think you just made the term up..."Fiber to the CO". LOL.

While true, it's not an official acronym that I'm aware of.


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12
said by wizkid6:

I think you just made the term up..."Fiber to the CO". LOL.

Yup, that's what I've been calling it ^_^ The fiber never leaves the CO (all the ADSL2+ circuits around here at least are CO fed), so...

/M


pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL

3 edits
reply to mackey
Ok, so I bought an Apple Airport Extreme to test out at my girlfriend's place, since she has the same 2Wire 3600HGV that I have.

I'm following this guy's article, which doesn't mention any bit-shifting in the IPv6 address, like you did. Any idea why that is?

»pastebin.com/0HRTSxqV

I'm not too good with Linux commands, so could you maybe break down the concatenation that's going on with the IPv6 Prefix and IPv4-to-hex value?

Let's say my IPv4 address is 107.196.32.140. The hex value would be: 6bc4:208c. So, if I concatenate that with the prefix you've provided me, I'd get: 2602:0300:6bc4:208c::/64. Does that sound right?

According to that article, I should be filling out these fields, which are available in the Apple Airport Utility:

Configure IPv6: Manually (other option: Automatically or Link-local only)
IPv6 Mode: Tunnel (other option: Native)

IPv6 WAN Address: 2602:0300:6bc4:208c::1
IPv6 Default Route: ::12.83.49.81
Remote IPv4 Address: 12.83.49.81
IPv6 Delegated Prefix: 2602:0300:6bc4:208c::/64
IPv6 LAN Address: 2602:0300:6bc4:208c::1 (is this the same as the WAN address, because we aren't supposed to be thinking in terms of NAT?)


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12
said by pcgeek86:

I'm following this guy's article, which doesn't mention any bit-shifting in the IPv6 address, like you did. Any idea why that is?

He's assuming the 6rdPrefixLen is 32. 32 makes the math/conversion nice and easy, but only allows 1 network. AT&T uses 28 which makes the conversion more difficult but allows up to 16 sub networks.

said by pcgeek86:

Let's say my IPv4 address is 107.196.32.140. The hex value would be: 6bc4:208c. So, if I concatenate that with the prefix you've provided me, I'd get: 2602:0300:6bc4:208c::/64. Does that sound right?

No, you need to shift it 1 digit and make it a /60:
107.196.32.140 = 6:bc42:08c
          = 2602:0306:bc42:08c0::/60

IPv6 WAN Address: 2602:0306:bc42:08c0::1/60
IPv6 Default Route: ::12.83.49.81
Remote IPv4 Address: 12.83.49.81
IPv6 Delegated Prefix: 2602:0306:bc42:08c0::/60
IPv6 LAN Address: 2602:0306:bc42:08c0::1/64 (is this the same as the WAN address, because we aren't supposed to be thinking in terms of NAT?) - no, this needs to be the /64, the addresses above are /60

If you have/want additional networks connected to this router (i.e. a "guest" network), you can have up to 16. They are:
2602:0306:bc42:08c0::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08c1::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08c2::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08c3::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08c4::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08c5::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08c6::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08c7::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08c8::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08c9::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08ca::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08cb::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08cc::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08cd::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08ce::1/64
2602:0306:bc42:08cf::1/64

/M


pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL

1 edit
said by mackey :

He's assuming the 6rdPrefixLen is 32. 32 makes the math/conversion nice and easy, but only allows 1 network. AT&T uses 28 which makes the conversion more difficult but allows up to 16 sub networks.

I knew there was an explanation, and now I finally understand. Earlier, you had told me that the 6rd prefix was 2602:030 (28 bits), which left a single missing digit (4 bits) in the second nibble. Since that missing digit is our starting point, we fill it with the first digit of our network address. Does that sound right?

----------------------------------------------------------

I've gotten IPv6 working (kind of) by using your exact methodology (see above), however I have one outstanding issue.

When I disable IPv4 on my Windows client, I'm not able to perform DNS queries, which results in everything being "broken." That being said, I can still ping these addresses, so I know that IPv6 connectivity is functioning properly:

2a03:2880:2110:df01:face:b00c:0:8 facebook.com AAAA record
2607:f8b0:4009:805::1003 google.com AAAA record
2602:306:bc42:08c0::1 router IPv6 address

I have configured two Google DNS server IP addresses in the router configuration.

Google DNS Servers

2001:4860:4860::8888
2001:4860:4860::8844

These commands are failing, when IPv4 is disabled:

nslookup -type=aaaa facebook.com;
nslookup -type=aaaa google.com;

Any thoughts on that?


ILpt4U
Premium
join:2006-11-12
Lisle, IL
kudos:9
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
reply to mackey
said by mackey:

said by wizkid6:

I think you just made the term up..."Fiber to the CO". LOL.

Yup, that's what I've been calling it ^_^ The fiber never leaves the CO (all the ADSL2+ circuits around here at least are CO fed), so...

/M

Not to go to far off topic, but there is RT/FTTN ADSL2+ IPDSLAM U-Verse out there

The term "IRAD" is used instead of "VRAD" - but it is the same Alcatel-Lucent 7330 shelf, with ADSL2+ Line cards (that applies whether CO or RT based). Sometimes the IRAD looks exactly like a VRAD, and sometimes they are located inside older RTs/CEVs

But I will confess, most IPDSLAM ADSL2+ U-Verse is CO based

Nothing really to contribute to the IPv6 discussion, but I find it interesting & educational - this is much more info about what is possible compared to what the Company has communicated to techs


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12
reply to pcgeek86
said by pcgeek86:

said by mackey :

He's assuming the 6rdPrefixLen is 32. 32 makes the math/conversion nice and easy, but only allows 1 network. AT&T uses 28 which makes the conversion more difficult but allows up to 16 sub networks.

I knew there was an explanation, and now I finally understand. Earlier, you had told me that the 6rd prefix was 2602:030 (28 bits), which left a single missing digit (4 bits) in the second nibble. Since that missing digit is our starting point, we fill it with the first digit of our network address. Does that sound right?

Yup!

said by pcgeek86:

When I disable IPv4 on my Windows client, I'm not able to perform DNS queries, which results in everything being "broken." That being said, I can still ping these addresses, so I know that IPv6 connectivity is functioning properly:

I have configured two Google DNS server IP addresses in the router configuration.

Google DNS Servers

These commands are failing, when IPv4 is disabled:

nslookup -type=aaaa facebook.com;
nslookup -type=aaaa google.com;

Any thoughts on that?

Hmmm, I'm not sure how that router advertises IPv6 name servers. Unfortunately RAs do not contain any name server info, so a client must use either DHCPv6 (full or just extra info like name servers) or RDNSS. Windows does not support RDNSS unless you download a program to do it, so unless your router is offering DHCPv6 (at least for name servers) then Windows will not grab those name servers. If you add them manually then IPv6 only should work.

/M


pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL
said by mackey :

Hmmm, I'm not sure how that router advertises IPv6 name servers. Unfortunately RAs do not contain any name server info, so a client must use either DHCPv6 (full or just extra info like name servers) or RDNSS. Windows does not support RDNSS unless you download a program to do it, so unless your router is offering DHCPv6 (at least for name servers) then Windows will not grab those name servers. If you add them manually then IPv6 only should work.

Yep, this is what I ended up doing. I configured the two IPv6 DNS servers on my Windows 8 client, statically. I will investigate DHCPv6 and RDNSS separately.

---------------------------------------------

I thank you for your awesome assistance in getting IPv6 on AT&T U-Verse working, via 6rd, today. Please see the links below for confirmation that your assistance has helped someone (me) out.

Send me your e-mail address, and I will send you a beer. I'm my username at Gmail.

»twitter.com/pcgeek86/status/3260···08251392

»plus.google.com/1066582230834576···GBE4ujYy


pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL
So, I found out that I can't seem to accept any inbound traffic. I turned off the Windows Firewall (not disable the service, which is bad practice) for the Private and Public profiles. At that point, I could get ping replies from this service:

»mebsd.com/ipv6-ping-and-traceroute

Unfortunately, this other service that does port testing couldn't ping me, or find any open ports.

»www.subnetonline.com/pages/ipv6-···ping.php

I have IIS 8 installed on my Windows 8 64-bit client, and I have verified that I can access IIS on port 80 locally using my public IPv6 address.

Any thoughts? I don't have any other firewall software installed. I just use the Windows Firewall.


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12

1 edit
Did you disable the "Block incoming IPv6 connections" setting on the Airport Extreme? It's enabled by default.

Edit to add: yeah, it's probably a firewall. A Stateful Packet Inspecting firewall is smart enough to recognize "probably related" connections and allow them through.

mebsd.com (the working one in your test) resolves to 2001:4d48:1337:5afe::2, and the ICMP echo request also comes from that same IP:
23:40:04.466319 IP6 2001:4d48:1337:5afe::2 > 2602:306:wxyz:xyz2:e87d:7fb0:c4f:b305: ICMP6, echo request, seq 0, length 64

www.subnetonline.com (the failing one) resolves to 2a02:348:82:cb69::1, however the ICMP echo requests come from a DIFFERENT IP:
23:38:38.567047 IP6 2a02:348:82:cb69::5 > 2602:306:wxyz:xyz2:e87d:7fb0:c4f:b305: ICMP6, echo request, seq 0, length 40

The SPI firewall sees you made a request to mebsd.com (2001:4d48:1337:5afe::2) and thus allows the "related" inbound ICMP request, but it has no record of you contacting 2a02:348:82:cb69::5 (www.subnetonline.com resolves to 2a02:348:82:cb69::1) and thus blocks it.

/M


pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL
I will check the "Block incoming IPv6 connections" setting on the Airport Extreme. I didn't realize that the option was there. Thanks for pointing it out.

Also, thanks for the detailed explanation on the Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI). That's very helpful to understand. It makes sense that the router's built-in firewall would block unsolicited inbound ICMPv6 traffic, but allow inbound ICMPv6 replies where a matching outbound ICMPv6 echo request was found.

I'll have to check the IPv6 blockage setting when I get home tonight. I will post back my results.


pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL
Ok, so I just had my girlfriend check to see if the "Block incoming IPv6 connections" checkbox was enabled, and apparently it's not there.

The Airport Utility is version 6.2, and the firmware is 7.6.3.

I've noticed that the Airport Utility interface is pretty simplistic ... is there any way to enable an advanced mode or something?


mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12
Some googling shows it's either under "Network > Network Options" or "Advanced > IPv6" (I'm not sure which versions of the firmware is which). Unfortunately I don't have access to an Airport to look for this myself.

/M


pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL
That's alright. I'll have to check it out myself later on today.

Here's an article that specifically talks about firmware 7.6.3, and says the option is under Network --> Network Options, just like you said.

»arstechnica.com/apple/2013/02/ai···-fix-it/


pcgeek86

join:2005-11-29
Woodstock, IL

1 recommendation

So, sure enough that checkbox does exist under Network --> Network Options. I wish it were tied in more closely with the other IPv6 options in the UI.

After unchecking the box, I was able to successfully to test TCP port 80 with IIS 8 on my public, randomized IPv6 address using the SubnetOnline port scanner.

»www.subnetonline.com/pages/ipv6-···nner.php

Thanks again for your assistance.

I grabbed my Asus RT-N16 with DD-WRT on it, and will be working to get that configured on AT&T U-Verse, similar to the Apple Airport Extreme. The Airport Extreme has served its purpose for testing, and will be returned to the store.