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34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
reply to mozerd

Re: IPv6 on Rogers

bump. mozerd, any further details since the initial post?



mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON
reply to mozerd

I have not spent anymore time on the IPv6 issue in my location. I do suspect that its got more to do with my ZyWALL USG Router ... getting the correct configuration.



hurleyp

join:2000-06-20
Ottawa, ON
Reviews:
·Rogers Hi-Speed
reply to mozerd

Sorry to revive an older topic, but I want to try IPv6 with Rogers on a Netgear router running DD-WRT. It's been a few months since I tried IPv6, but it seems that the test site:

»ipv6.rogers.com/

is unresponsive. Does anyone know if there is a new IPv6 test/config site, or has Rogers abandoned IPv6 for the time being?
--
"I reject your reality and substitute my own."


34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON

said by hurleyp:

Sorry to revive an older topic, but I want to try IPv6 with Rogers on a Netgear router running DD-WRT. It's been a few months since I tried IPv6, but it seems that the test site:

»ipv6.rogers.com/

is unresponsive. Does anyone know if there is a new IPv6 test/config site, or has Rogers abandoned IPv6 for the time being?

Well the topic was about native IPv6 which Rogers still does not have.

The Rogers site there provided details for an unsupported 6RD tunnel. You can pick up a supported 6in4 tunnel from Hurricane... »tunnelbroker.net/


SimplePanda

join:2003-09-22
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL

1 recommendation

The ipv6.rogers.com also had information about Rogers 6to4 service as well as general documentation about IPv6 and their eventual native plans.

It's removal doesn't bode well.

Comcast in the US expects to have 75% of their subscriber base enabled for IPv6 by the end of 2014 (basically if you have a DOCSIS 3.0 connection Comcast will be able to give you dual-stack native this year).

Rogers, as usual, is comically behind.


65194623

join:2014-01-14

1 recommendation

said by SimplePanda:

The ipv6.rogers.com also had information about Rogers 6to4 service as well as general documentation about IPv6 and their eventual native plans.

It's removal doesn't bode well.

6to4/6RD.... no one cares. It was unsupported services at that.

It was a fluff piece PR site which was mostly irrelevant and had almost no useful information on it. Having that go down means nothing.

said by SimplePanda:

Rogers, as usual, is comically behind.

Most of the industry is comically behind the curve.

zamarac

join:2008-11-29
reply to SimplePanda

said by SimplePanda:

Rogers, as usual, is comically behind.

What would be primary advantages for end users when moved to IPv6? Faster speed or IP address return from DNS server? Or what...


aefstoggaflm
Open Source Fan
Premium
join:2002-03-04
Bethlehem, PA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·PenTeleData
·Verizon Online DSL

said by zamarac:

said by SimplePanda:

Rogers, as usual, is comically behind.

What would be primary advantages for end users when moved to IPv6? Faster speed or IP address return from DNS server? Or what...

I will repeat what I said in other threads.

I point to and quote from »Re: [Business] Any updates on the IPv6 business trials? (which is a sub-selection from »[IPv6] Why all the hoopla over IPv6? trials- )

#1

quote:
Some larger ISPs have some blocks of IPv4 address slack, but for a lot of smaller ones and for many hosting providers, they're running dry and have been for a while. Most cellular providers are already NATting cellular data connections.

And, it's gotten to the point where IP blocks are being bought and sold like a finite resource. Microsoft paid roughly $11.25 per IP address to acquire a block of IPv4 addresses from the bankrupt Nortel estate:

»www.networkworld.com/community/b···-address

$11.25 for an IPv4 address doesn't sound like a lot, but the number of hosts connecting will continue to expand while the number of IPV4 addresses will not. This means that price WILL go up as the commodity becomes scarcer... and that will start to hit your monthly internet bill... UNLESS people start aggressively pushing their ISPs to roll out IPv6 sooner.

#2

quote:
While an IPv6 address won't enhance your internet connection or provide extra features, the fact is, your experience on IPv4 will start to degrade over time. More people will be forced on NATs, meaning blocked ports. Hosting a website or server on IPv4 will become more and more expensive, and eventually almost impossible. And as websites start to go IPv6 only, it'll be harder for people not connected over IPv6 to reach those sites.

The simple fact is, we can start pushing to migrate now so that it continues to be "not a big deal," or we can be complacent about it and wait until it starts to get really bad.

^^
--
Please use the "yellow (IM) envelope" to contact me and please leave the URL intact.


SimplePanda

join:2003-09-22
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL

2 recommendations

reply to zamarac

said by zamarac:

said by SimplePanda:

Rogers, as usual, is comically behind.

What would be primary advantages for end users when moved to IPv6? Faster speed or IP address return from DNS server? Or what...

The reality is, NAT is a problem and always has been. We do all sorts of silly things to try to "get around" NAT devices; UPnP, NAT-PMP and hole punching being the primary methods.

Some excellent examples of applications that generally improve (get more reliable and/or faster) or become more common in an "all IPv6" world:

- Games, especially with Xbox One (see: »www.internetsociety.org/deploy36···er-ipv6/)
- VoIP (with a lot less lag - the tricks Skype does with super nodes to try to facilitate peer to peer calling in a NAT'd world are really clever but become unnecessary; likewise SIP without ICE is a potentially a reality. Why have 100ms latency through a server when you can get 20ms latency peer to peer?).
- Home access (easy streaming data from your home computers rather than some cloud service you pay for)

I can go on and on.

As aefstoggaflm pointed out, IPv4 "just works" right now but as address exhaustion continues silly things like CGNat are going to start become more common. This is going to start breaking and degrading the way parts of the Internet presently work. People who don't know how IP works always ask "What's the point of 6 when 4 works so well?". That's all fine and dandy today but I'd rather not have a half-working Internet 5 years from now while Rogers still drags its feet on a v6 deployment that will return functionality to what it has been.

Moving to IPv6 NOW is the way to avoid this. Everyone's operating systems more or less support it already (from computer to smartphone). It's really just CPE equipment and that's 100% the carriers at this point (my mind). Rogers/Bell in Ontario basically force all decent access package customers (25 Mbps+) to use one of their crappy gateway devices. None of these really support IPv6 properly.

If Rogers can slowly force us all to DOCSIS 3.0 based hardware to alleviate pressure on their network (and rightly so) they could have easily ensured that IPv6 was baked into those devices (assuming their network was ready for it). They didn't and now they're behind.

It's not like they have much excuse in the way of "but nobody is doing it!" anymore (the refrain many have been using):

- Comcast is targetting 75%+ native penetration of dual-stack IPv6 this year (basically everyone on DOCSIS 3.0 from what I can tell).
- TWC is already up to about 5%. Well behind Comcast but better than Rogers / Bell / Telus' 0%.
- Verizon Wireless announced in August 2012 that over 25% of their wireless traffic is already IPv6 (they built IPv6 into their LTE rollout).
- T-Mobile is IPv6 native to any device that supports it.
- TekSavvy here in Canada of course offers native IPv6 to any DSL customer to wants it.
- Videotron is already doing beta 6rd with DHCP auto-configure to anyone who wants it.

What is Bell / Rogers / Telus doing? Nothing, really. "Preparing their network" has been the public commentary for quite some time.

Someone mentioned that Rogers had to "push back" their native trials because of an issue discovered in their DOCSIS 3.0 modem and/or CMTS software. Funny how at 25%+ saturation and growing Comcast hasn't been derailed in a similar way.

Rogers at least HAD a public IPv6 info site for a while. That's quietly gone down with no mention as to why. Their static, manually configured 6rd service (6rdrelay.rogers.com) still seems to work but it's not supported at all.

It's just the usual laziness of Canadian carriers. They're not innovators or technical leaders - they just deploy what they can buy on the cheap from American companies doing the actual innovation and they only roll out what they have to if they feel they're behind.

Rogers et al are out of excuses. They're way behind on this. IPv6 is like a bandaid... sooner they rip it off the quicker we can move on.


mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON

Excellent post SimplePanda