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boway

join:2013-03-08

Network?

Hi Everyone,

I woke this morning to find a second wireless device on my network. I have not added anyting, so where did it come from and how do I tell what it is?

Thanks


dslx_nick
Premium,VIP
join:2011-12-24
Chatsworth, CA
kudos:28
The most likely culprit is a neighbor with a wireless computer connecting to your network, especially if you haven't set a password on your wireless.

Unfortunately, identifying exactly what or who it is, is a bit more problematic. Each device is identified by a unique MAC Address, a hardware identifier. Every computer, router, printer, etc. has one. Trying to determine whose MAC Address that is, however, is kind of like the average layman looking at a set of fingerprints and trying to determine whose it is, without access to a fingerprint database... you can try looking up the MAC Address online (for example, at »www.coffer.com/mac_find/ or »aruljohn.com/mac.pl), but at best it probably will only be able to tell you the computer manufacturer, if that.

I would definitely recommend setting a new, secure password on your wireless connection. In addition, many routers will let you set a blacklist to block out specific MAC Addresses, so you could probably use that to block the offending MAC Address. If you do that and then realize you cannot print to your wireless printer or you've got an iPhone you had forgotten about that is no longer able to share files, then you can edit the blacklist and remove the entry accordingly.

boway

join:2013-03-08
Hey Nick,

As always thanks for your reply!!! I guess they got around my password so I have disabled my wifi till I can figure out how better to secure my 2Wire 2701HG-B. Any ideas?

Thanks Again


dslx_nick
Premium,VIP
join:2011-12-24
Chatsworth, CA
kudos:28
2701? If you go to Home Network -> Wireless Settings, uncheck the SSID Broadcast and then change the Network Name to something different. Then, under Wireless Security, make sure that's Enabled and change the password to something different.


aefstoggaflm
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1 edit
said by dslx_nick:

2701? If you go to Home Network -> Wireless Settings, uncheck the SSID Broadcast and then change the Network Name to something different. Then, under Wireless Security, make sure that's Enabled and change the password to something different.

I agree with all of those but not hidding the SSID.

As to why I do not agree with hidding the SSID:

#1 I point to »www.howtogeek.com/howto/28653/de···-secure/

#2 Read the whole page.

Here is a summary of what that page says:

a) Wireless SSIDs Were Never Designed to Be Hidden.

b) Finding Hidden SSIDs Is a Trivial Task.

c) Hidden Wireless Networks Are a Pain to Deal With.

d) Hiding the Network Leads to Potential Connection Problems.

e) Hidden Wireless SSIDs Actually Leak Your SSID Name.

said by dslx_nick:

Unfortunately, identifying exactly what or who it is, is a bit more problematic. Each device is identified by a unique MAC Address, a hardware identifier. Every computer, router, printer, etc. has one. Trying to determine whose MAC Address that is, however, is kind of like the average layman looking at a set of fingerprints and trying to determine whose it is, without access to a fingerprint database... you can try looking up the MAC Address online (for example, at »www.coffer.com/mac_find/ or »aruljohn.com/mac.pl), but at best it probably will only be able to tell you the computer manufacturer, if that.

In addition, many routers will let you set a blacklist to block out specific MAC Addresses, so you could probably use that to block the offending MAC Address. If you do that and then realize you cannot print to your wireless printer or you've got an iPhone you had forgotten about that is no longer able to share files, then you can edit the blacklist and remove the entry accordingly.

Interesting tips, but the problem(s) with MAC Address Filtering are that:

#1 MAC Address(es) can be spoofed/cloned.

#2 Regardless of the wireless encryption used (if any) MAC Address(es), are always sent in the clear.
--
Please use the "yellow (IM) envelope" to contact me and please leave the URL intact.


NormanS
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reply to boway
What level of encryption does the 2Wire 2701HG-B allow?

If WPA2-PSK (AES), how long is your password? (Longer is better; under 10 is probably no more secure than WEP.)
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum


dslx_nick
Premium,VIP
join:2011-12-24
Chatsworth, CA
kudos:28
I believe it's limited to WPA-PSK, unless it's a newer firmware etc. than I'm familiar with. At this point, security is largely a matter of being a less-attractive target, so the local leech decides to find an easier target to bother. =/

boway

join:2013-03-08
reply to boway
Hey Guys,

Thanks for your replies. I think I have a good idea what to do now.

Thanks Again!