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alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

Crown molding - Baseboard - Trim - Ceiling white or other?

Would you paint your moldings, trims and baseboards with the same paint as the ceiling? Or should they get a different finish?

Would you re-prime and repaint your MDF molding/trim/baseboards or just repaint (no primer)? I ask that because those moldings seem to often come pre-scratched/damaged

If I buy pine baseboards and paint them white with good primer, will they look the same as the MDF crowns above? (If they are painted with the same paint?) I'd prefer to spend the extra $ on pine baseboards since my kids smash their hot wheels and barbies into it (Girls smash barbie cars right?)


beck
Premium,MVM
join:2002-01-29
On The Road
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Stablehost.com
If you are going to paint your other woodwork, then I would prefer the crown moldings to be the same color for an accent. But if that means that the ceiling is white and so is the crown molding, what's the diff?

I scrub woodwork and just paint as long as I have a good base for the paint to stick to after a light sanding or steelwool.

Kids are kids. you can teach them to be more careful and show them the chip in the woodwork. Otherwise, it is the way it is.
--
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jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
reply to alkizmo
Just paint the trim work with semi-gloss or satin to make them stand out a bit, depending on your preferences. You'll never know if it's wood or MDF once finished painting.

I would re-think pine for the baseboards, it's pretty soft and gets dinged very easily. Look into maple?
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alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by jack b:

I would re-think pine for the baseboards, it's pretty soft and gets dinged very easily. Look into maple?

pricey. what about poplar?

btw my walls are eggshell. wouldnt satin/semi gloss pop too much?


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
Reviews:
·AT&T Southeast
reply to alkizmo
I actually prefer the MDF formed baseboard to real wood. No irregularities and less stiff so they hug the wall a bit better.

As I use a bright-white ceiling paint, I would not paint the trims with the same paint.

The MDF trims at H.D. are primed. I just put two coats of paint on them before installing and then touch up.
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alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to alkizmo
»www.homedepot.ca/product/kilz-pr···l/959099

how is this?

btw i read the primer that comes on the trims suck.
i have a good gallon of drywall primer left over.


jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
reply to alkizmo
I think satin/semi-gloss and eggshell look nice together. You want the trim to pop.

Poplar is very hard. If you can get it in the trim you like it will be "bullet proof"
--
~Help Find a Cure for Cancer~
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alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by jack b:

Poplar is very hard. If you can get it in the trim you like it will be "bullet proof"

i can. will it look the same as mdf once painted?


jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
I can't think of any reason why it shouldn't look the same when painted.


Jim
Premium
join:2003-02-10
reply to jack b
said by jack b:

I think satin/semi-gloss and eggshell look nice together. You want the trim to pop.

Poplar is very hard. If you can get it in the trim you like it will be "bullet proof"

Although poplar is indeed classified as a hardwood, it is by no means 'hard'. It does take paint nicely.
--

H_T_R_N
Premium
join:2011-12-06
Valencia, PA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·voip.ms
reply to beck
said by beck:

...snip...the paint to stick to after a light sanding or steelwool.

....snip....

Never (rule of thumb) use steelwool if you are going to use a water based paint, stain or sealer.

Tig

join:2006-06-29
Carrying Place, ON
Reviews:
·voip.ms

1 edit
reply to alkizmo
Ceilings are usually a flat paint. Trim, baseboards, crowns are at least semi-gloss to give them a subtle pop. Also to be more serviceable in the case of trim and baseboards.

For crash resistance, I like MDF. Dents are easily patched. Cracks not so much. Poplar is one of the softest woods available. Although it is harder than basswood, hemlock and pine.
»tinytimbers.com/janka.htm

Pre primed MDF with a quick TSP wipe should be ready for paint.

Tig

join:2006-06-29
Carrying Place, ON
Reviews:
·voip.ms
reply to H_T_R_N
said by H_T_R_N:

Never (rule of thumb) use steelwool if you are going to use a water based paint, stain or sealer.

I've read that rule, but I'd like to find some personal experience with this. Seems to me only the lightest colour finishes could have visible rust spec issues. Maybe I'm missing something.

Badonkadonk
Premium
join:2000-12-17
Naperville, IL
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Dish Network
reply to alkizmo
I'd use finger jointed poplar if you're going to paint. It looks the same as MDF. In other words, there's no visible grain to the poplar once painted. Poplar and pine are probably about the same in terms of hardness, but the poplar is less expensive.

For us, we recently had all of our upstairs finished in crown. We used a glossy linen color for all of the trim in the house, including the crown. We use white ceiling paint for the ceilings. There's enough contrast between the trim and the ceiling paint to make the trim look nice, since the walls have color. The linen gives it a nice rich look.
--
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bryank

join:2000-03-23
Plainfield, IL
reply to alkizmo
In my office build project, I painted my baseboards from their normal "wood" color with a semi-gloss enamel paint. They are very durable from dings and scratches. I did sand them a little to remove the previous finish and did maybe 2-3 coats on the boards.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to alkizmo
Does this seem upside down or is it correct?


Warzau
Premium
join:2000-10-26
Naperville, IL
kudos:1

1 recommendation

Doesn't matter it has the same profile on both ends.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
actually the profile isn't identical, but anyway I just went with what's in the picture.

Man, installing crown molding is a real puzzle! Figuring out the miter and bevel angles, learning coping, I'm still scratching my head on my first exterior corner, I followed the miter and bevel angles, but it doesn't work well (Yet my corner is 89 degrees, so pretty darn close).

I can't wait to bring in Einstein in to figure out a corner where 3 crown moldings join up!


BillRoland
Premium
join:2001-01-21
Ocala, FL
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cox HSI
reply to sempergoofy
said by sempergoofy:

I actually prefer the MDF formed baseboard to real wood. No irregularities and less stiff so they hug the wall a bit better.

As I use a bright-white ceiling paint, I would not paint the trims with the same paint.

The MDF trims at H.D. are primed. I just put two coats of paint on them before installing and then touch up.

Kind of the same boat here, the real wood stuff at Lowes has gotten so bad with knots and warped pieces its almost impossible to find anything useable lately.
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no tips here

@videotron.ca
reply to alkizmo
Crown moulding certainly is a level up in the do it yourself category. That is, doing it right and making it look great.

I know people who will do all their drywall and build up a place from scratch, but won't touch the crown moulding and instead call someone in due to the price of it and the learning curve of doing it right.

I've also seen some great books on it. Step-by-step type things the size of encyclopedias loaded with great tips.

Wouldn't hurt to stop in at the local library to see what they have on hand.

Crown moulding is your eye-candy. You really want that looking good. But if you're going to do it yourself, best plan on wasting lots for the learning processes and no harm done grabbing a couple of books on it.


StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL

1 edit
reply to alkizmo
Search for coping crown molding dremel if you have not done so.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to no tips here
said by no tips here :

But if you're going to do it yourself, best plan on wasting lots for the learning processes and no harm done grabbing a couple of books on it.

I've done my whole basement from scratch so far. I think I can DIY crown moldings

said by StillLearn:

Search for coping crown molding dreme>/b> if you have not done so.

No need, I can cope with a coping saw no problem.


no tips here

@videotron.ca
said by alkizmo:

said by no tips here :

But if you're going to do it yourself, best plan on wasting lots for the learning processes and no harm done grabbing a couple of books on it.

I've done my whole basement from scratch so far. I think I can DIY crown moldings

Just saying, it's a craft on it's own. That's all.

Badonkadonk
Premium
join:2000-12-17
Naperville, IL
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Dish Network
It's really not that hard once you get the angle of the cuts right and learn to flip the crown. Coping is pretty easy as well once you do a piece or two.

Yeah, you waste some, but I don't think lots.
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Really, Obammy? 18% tax rate and you criticised Romney??? Jackass.