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biochemistry
Premium
join:2003-05-09
92361

Benefits of Wired Network

I'm building a new home and trying to decide whether I should install a CAT6A network supplemented with Wireless or if I should save some $ and just stick with wireless for everything. What are the real benefits in going with a wired network?


JoelTR

join:2000-12-05
Carmichael, CA
Reviews:
·Comcast
·AT&T U-Verse
Here's a link that answers your question: »www.digitaltrends.com/computing/ ··· d-wired/.

Personally, I prefer wired network due its better security and speed.


shdesigns
Powered By Infinite Improbabilty Drive
Premium
join:2000-12-01
Stone Mountain, GA
Reviews:
·EarthLink
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1 recommendation

reply to biochemistry
I have both here. Wireless was ok to start but streaming was always better wired.

Now 6 more AP's show up. This is hilly, wooded area and 1/2ac lots. Now wireless is useless for watching video even in low res at times due to interference. Wired always works. There is also a 12" steel beam running down the center of the house. It causes dead areas no matter where I put the router.

Wired will always work no matter what your neighbors do

The cost of wiring is trivial in the cost of a home. I'd have conduit run to the main rooms to a basement or attic so needed wires can be added and would start with CAT6.
--
Scott Henion

Embedded Systems Consultant,
SHDesigns home - DIY Welder


John97
Over The Hills And Far Away
Premium
join:2000-11-14
Spring Hill, FL
kudos:1
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·ooma

1 recommendation

reply to biochemistry
I had my whole house wired for gigabit LAN... Then I did something dumb and moved.

I am getting by on wireless in the new house, but am planning on pulling cable through the walls and attic.

Put in the jacks and cabling now when it's easy, you won't regret it later.

--
So put me on a highway, and show me a sign.
And take it to the limit one more time...


fluffybunny

@teksavvy.com
reply to biochemistry
a wired network works when your microwave is on.
it works 10X faster than a wireless link.
it has no problems with saturation or bandwidth when connecting multiple clients to it.
the transceiver chips wont die after 1-2 years.
it uses less power.

Tig

join:2006-06-29
Carrying Place, ON

1 recommendation

reply to biochemistry
I put a couple hard wired drops in for things I want secure. ie: Banking, work.
I also put a drop in for the tv, since it doesn't move.
For the drops that I did put in, I used conduit.
Wireless router is on it's own drop under the living room.

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
Pearland, TX
kudos:4
reply to biochemistry
if you still have bare walls, I'd run cat6, rg6, and fiber to all location where you think you will need them...and then have them all in a central location where you can put your network gear, dvr and nas serving audio and video needs...

I wired up mine on all rooms, including family room where my home theater is right now, 1 in the kitchen and 1 in the garage.


guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:4
reply to biochemistry
Wired for sure, wireless g/n only has 3 non overlapping channels and if someone is using 40mhz channels, that drops down to 2. It only takes one or two other routers in the neighborhood to tank wireless speeds, so wire the home


dib22

join:2002-01-27
Kansas City, MO
reply to biochemistry
Wired is more reliable overall... I would run 3 cat 6 to each room... that will give you plenty of expandability should you ever need it. The last place I wired we used 2 cat 6 and 1 cat 5e to each gang box, used the cat 5e because we had it on hand. The cat 5e ended up being used for phone jacks.

I would also run 2 high quality quad core coax to any location where you might have tv... this will allow you to run cable OR satellite.

The key thing is that while the walls are open your only expense is the wire.... once those walls are finished it will be more expensive, or more work to run a line where you need it.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to biochemistry
Wired is absolutely better. For me wireless is a necessary evil for portable devices.

I have a dual band wireless AP which is ceiling mounted. It's an EnGenius EAP600. It's powered with PoE and I have a single Cat6 going from my basement up to the ceiling.


nunya
LXI 483
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join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
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3 recommendations

reply to biochemistry
I would run 14 Cat7a, 12 RG6QS, 2 Multi-mode fibers, 3 single mode fibers, and one twinax drop(s) to each wall of each room.

Sound ridiculous? Much of the advice you'll receive in this thread will be nearly as ridiculous.

I'm a wire guy. I do this for living. The reality is that wired networks are on the decrease as the devices we use become completely wireless (tablets, TVs, smart phones, laptops, etc...). Even with all of the cons that accompany wireless, it's here to stay.

Realistically, I'd install 1 RG6 and 1 Cat5 or Cat6 cable to each room. In new construction, it would be silly not to.

This way you'll have a wired option available if you do need it.

The only "future-proof" way of wiring a house doesn't involve wire at all. It's called conduit.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
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1 recommendation

reply to biochemistry
Wireless and wired networks both have their place.

Gigabit ethernet is faster than any WiFi standard currently on the market, it is also reliable 100% of the time (wiring and hardware faults notwithstanding), and bandwidth is not shared.

This makes it the obvious choice for devices requiring lots of bandwidth, or a very reliable connection. This is why I prefer to wire in all PCs and multimedia devices.

Wireless on the other hand has one thing that ethernet doesn't: the convenience of being wireless. Obviously, handheld/mobile devices aren't very practical tied to an ethernet cable.

To sum it all up, if I were building a new home, DEFINITELY YES I would be installing CAT6. Two drops to every room, with the exception of washrooms cause that would just be silly. I would also run a cable to the ceiling in a central location on the upper level of the house, and install a proper ceiling-mounted PoE wireless access point.

GusHerb94

join:2011-11-04
Chicago, IL
kudos:1
reply to biochemistry
Right away after wiring the upstairs bedrooms for CaTV and Gbit ethernet I'm using one run for a PC and one for an Obihai ATA. I like being able to use wired-only devices (such as most ATA's) in multiple rooms instead of having to hook it up to the router in the already crowded entertainment center.

Also with the way I set everything up I can now easily move the cable modem and router to different rooms if I ever decide to.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

I would run 14 Cat7a, 12 RG6QS, 2 Multi-mode fibers, 3 single mode fibers, and one twinax drop(s) to each wall of each room.

Sound ridiculous? Much of the advice you'll receive in this thread will be nearly as ridiculous.

Realistically, I'd install 1 RG6 and 1 Cat5 or Cat6 cable to each room. In new construction, it would be silly not to.

This way you'll have a wired option available if you do need it.

The only "future-proof" way of wiring a house doesn't involve wire at all. It's called conduit.

+1 on new construction.


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

Realistically, I'd install 1 RG6 and 1 Cat5 or Cat6 cable to each room. In new construction, it would be silly not to.

+1 and exactly what I did when I built my house last year; with one exception...

I did 2 x Cat5e & 2 x RG6 to the planned TV locations - Media players / BluRay players / SmartTV's / STB's all want internet connections these days, and for streaming media, Wired is just more reliable... To be honest, I'm almost wishing I'd gone 3 x LAN at the TV locations.

TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI
reply to biochemistry
If you want to save money, go with CAT6 instead of CAT6A. While you're at it, add RG6 since even the higher end quad-shielded stuff is pretty cheap at less than $50 for a 500' spool. There will never be a better/easier/cheaper time to wire a house for anything then while the house is being built and no drywall or insulation is installed.

Personally I'd go with two drops per room except for the room where a TV is most likely to live - in that room I'd install 4 drops with two on each wall.

It's also true that conduit is the only way to future-proof the house in terms of structured wiring, so if that was an option I'd have that installed. But I wouldn't blame you if you skipped it (I did).

tcope
Premium
join:2003-05-07
Sandy, UT
kudos:2
reply to biochemistry
Not knocking a wired connection at all.. but keep in mind, gigabit connections mainly apply to file transfers from one computer in the house to another. Most (not all) Internet speeds are way less. Personally I've never had a problem finding a clear channel to my wireless but certainly it could be a problem.

comp
Premium
join:2001-08-16
Evans City, PA
reply to biochemistry
If you have Coax you could also use MOCA

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
Pearland, TX
kudos:4
reply to LazMan
said by LazMan:

said by nunya:

Realistically, I'd install 1 RG6 and 1 Cat5 or Cat6 cable to each room. In new construction, it would be silly not to.

+1 and exactly what I did when I built my house last year; with one exception...

I did 2 x Cat5e & 2 x RG6 to the planned TV locations - Media players / BluRay players / SmartTV's / STB's all want internet connections these days, and for streaming media, Wired is just more reliable... To be honest, I'm almost wishing I'd gone 3 x LAN at the TV locations.

in another thread old_tech See ProfileRe: looking for thread w clean wiring ] believes that wireless will be KING in the next few years, believing it will overtake wired connections in everything....

I was lucky to be able to build my network [2 cate5e, 2 rg6 per room / location] when our house was being built but if I had to go back in time, I would have added more wires.


nunya
LXI 483
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join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:13
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1 recommendation

He's absolutely right. In fact, in resi situations wireless IS king right now, and it will continue to reign.

Am I saying wireless is superior? No. But for most people it's "good enough". The problem with asking a question like this on DSLR is that you will elicit responses from a demographic that is "techie" saturated. Most normal people are not. All they care about is whether or not Facebook and email works.

Very few of my customers will even consider having wired networks installed these days. Why? Because they are happy with their wireless. All they want is coax for their CATV / SAT. Fortunately, coax can carry both video and data if a wired connection is needed in the future.

In the 90's and even early 2000's, I was pulling composite cables with included fiber optic cables. I now realize what a total and complete waste it was. The WANs capable of delivering those kind of speeds never came.
Realistically, FTTP and Gigabit WAN connections will not happen any time in the near future for 99% of us.

Yes, it does make perfect sense to install wired networks in a new home. It does not make any sense to go completely overboard.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

I would run 14 Cat7a, 12 RG6QS, 2 Multi-mode fibers, 3 single mode fibers, and one twinax drop(s) to each wall of each room.

Sound ridiculous? Much of the advice you'll receive in this thread will be nearly as ridiculous.

I'm a wire guy. I do this for living. The reality is that wired networks are on the decrease as the devices we use become completely wireless (tablets, TVs, smart phones, laptops, etc...). Even with all of the cons that accompany wireless, it's here to stay.

Realistically, I'd install 1 RG6 and 1 Cat5 or Cat6 cable to each room. In new construction, it would be silly not to.

This way you'll have a wired option available if you do need it.

The only "future-proof" way of wiring a house doesn't involve wire at all. It's called conduit.

Yes, devices are becoming wireless but relying solely on wireless is not a good idea. Wireless is shared bandwidth and some streaming simply does not work on wireless. If you're using media center with XBOXes and stream HD it is not going to work well on wireless.

Besides, I'm somewhat of the mindset that if it plugs into the wall it should connect to wired ethernet.

Multimode fiber is ridiculous. But running one or two Cat6 drops per room is fine and future proof for quite a while. Why? Because most homes will be just fine with gigabit for many years to come. Most don't even need anything over 100Mbps. Even 10 gig will work over copper for limited distances and reduced throughput.


Thaler
Premium
join:2004-02-02
Los Angeles, CA
kudos:3
reply to biochemistry
For the amount of $ you save vs. the potential amount of kicking yourself later, just install the CAT6A while it's easy with the walls bare. Worst case scenario, it goes unused, and you're out a very small fraction of the home building cost.

Wired networks are always much simpler (is it plugged in? it's working) and faster than wireless. One can potentially run into many problems with wireless over time (neighbors? microwave? dense appliances/walls? gremlins?) but wired will always be available as a go-to no-hassle network option.

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
Pearland, TX
kudos:4
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

He's absolutely right. In fact, in resi situations wireless IS king right now, and it will continue to reign.

Am I saying wireless is superior? No. But for most people it's "good enough". The problem with asking a question like this on DSLR is that you will elicit responses from a demographic that is "techie" saturated. Most normal people are not. All they care about is whether or not Facebook and email works.

did you read his posts? he said wireless is KING in speeds...he claims that wireless can surpass 1gig and 2 gig soon with wireless ac which is still technically a draft.

wired on the other hand is KING now in terms of speeds alone and can easily do 1gig now.

but yes, it is not superior and I wouldn't rely on it. I agree it is good enough but the not the best. I still like my wired connections with the exception of maybe using my iphone and a tablet or laptop...


natedj
Elected
Premium
join:2001-06-06
Columbia, SC
reply to biochemistry
By all means, install the Cat6 and coax, it is a no brainer.
My rule is, if your device has an Ethernet port, use it!
Wireless is only for Tablets, phones, miscellaneous appliances like thermostats etc. and Visiting Guests.
--
Good judgement comes with experience...Experience comes after bad judgements


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to biochemistry
If the walls aren't up do wired.
JUST DO IT.

others will explain more fully.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to shdesigns
said by shdesigns:

I have both here. Wireless was ok to start but streaming was always better wired.

Now 6 more AP's show up. This is hilly, wooded area and 1/2ac lots. Now wireless is useless for watching video even in low res at times due to interference. Wired always works. There is also a 12" steel beam running down the center of the house. It causes dead areas no matter where I put the router.

Wired will always work no matter what your neighbors do

The cost of wiring is trivial in the cost of a home. I'd have conduit run to the main rooms to a basement or attic so needed wires can be added and would start with CAT6.

Get a router that you can up the transmit power and some high gain ant's

that'll take care of the interference (over power them to the point their's won't work)
--
»www.change.org/petitions/create- ··· imcity-4


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:13
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
reply to fifty nine
I have one elderly draft N wireless router (Dlink DIR-655). We have 3 Roku boxes, a Wii, and an Xbox (w/ media center, I might add). All wirelessly connected.
Not to mention 4 smartphones and 4 laptops.

There have been times where we have had 4 HD streams (720p H.262) running simultaneously with no issues whatsoever. The old "it won't do HD" myth is bunk. It will do it just fine.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8

1 recommendation

reply to biochemistry
Wireless - subject to interference.

Wired - impervious to interference.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

I have one elderly draft N wireless router (Dlink DIR-655). We have 3 Roku boxes, a Wii, and an Xbox (w/ media center, I might add). All wirelessly connected.
Not to mention 4 smartphones and 4 laptops.

There have been times where we have had 4 HD streams (720p H.262) running simultaneously with no issues whatsoever. The old "it won't do HD" myth is bunk. It will do it just fine.

It amazes me that people will try to dispute what your real-life experience with wireless is.


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
Success with large amounts of bandwidth over wifi is definitely a YMMV issue. If there are a lot of people nearby with overlapping channels you'll likely have more pauses and jitters in streaming. If your area is relatively clear you can have a great experience.

I think that wired connections will ALWAYS work at 100% (assuming the wires were run and terminated correctly) with no issues. Wifi very well may work that well, too.