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fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to nunya

Re: Benefits of Wired Network

said by nunya:

I would run 14 Cat7a, 12 RG6QS, 2 Multi-mode fibers, 3 single mode fibers, and one twinax drop(s) to each wall of each room.

Sound ridiculous? Much of the advice you'll receive in this thread will be nearly as ridiculous.

I'm a wire guy. I do this for living. The reality is that wired networks are on the decrease as the devices we use become completely wireless (tablets, TVs, smart phones, laptops, etc...). Even with all of the cons that accompany wireless, it's here to stay.

Realistically, I'd install 1 RG6 and 1 Cat5 or Cat6 cable to each room. In new construction, it would be silly not to.

This way you'll have a wired option available if you do need it.

The only "future-proof" way of wiring a house doesn't involve wire at all. It's called conduit.

Yes, devices are becoming wireless but relying solely on wireless is not a good idea. Wireless is shared bandwidth and some streaming simply does not work on wireless. If you're using media center with XBOXes and stream HD it is not going to work well on wireless.

Besides, I'm somewhat of the mindset that if it plugs into the wall it should connect to wired ethernet.

Multimode fiber is ridiculous. But running one or two Cat6 drops per room is fine and future proof for quite a while. Why? Because most homes will be just fine with gigabit for many years to come. Most don't even need anything over 100Mbps. Even 10 gig will work over copper for limited distances and reduced throughput.


Thaler
Premium
join:2004-02-02
Los Angeles, CA
kudos:3
reply to biochemistry
For the amount of $ you save vs. the potential amount of kicking yourself later, just install the CAT6A while it's easy with the walls bare. Worst case scenario, it goes unused, and you're out a very small fraction of the home building cost.

Wired networks are always much simpler (is it plugged in? it's working) and faster than wireless. One can potentially run into many problems with wireless over time (neighbors? microwave? dense appliances/walls? gremlins?) but wired will always be available as a go-to no-hassle network option.

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

He's absolutely right. In fact, in resi situations wireless IS king right now, and it will continue to reign.

Am I saying wireless is superior? No. But for most people it's "good enough". The problem with asking a question like this on DSLR is that you will elicit responses from a demographic that is "techie" saturated. Most normal people are not. All they care about is whether or not Facebook and email works.

did you read his posts? he said wireless is KING in speeds...he claims that wireless can surpass 1gig and 2 gig soon with wireless ac which is still technically a draft.

wired on the other hand is KING now in terms of speeds alone and can easily do 1gig now.

but yes, it is not superior and I wouldn't rely on it. I agree it is good enough but the not the best. I still like my wired connections with the exception of maybe using my iphone and a tablet or laptop...


natedj
Elected
Premium
join:2001-06-06
Columbia, SC
reply to biochemistry
By all means, install the Cat6 and coax, it is a no brainer.
My rule is, if your device has an Ethernet port, use it!
Wireless is only for Tablets, phones, miscellaneous appliances like thermostats etc. and Visiting Guests.
--
Good judgement comes with experience...Experience comes after bad judgements


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to biochemistry
If the walls aren't up do wired.
JUST DO IT.

others will explain more fully.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to shdesigns
said by shdesigns:

I have both here. Wireless was ok to start but streaming was always better wired.

Now 6 more AP's show up. This is hilly, wooded area and 1/2ac lots. Now wireless is useless for watching video even in low res at times due to interference. Wired always works. There is also a 12" steel beam running down the center of the house. It causes dead areas no matter where I put the router.

Wired will always work no matter what your neighbors do

The cost of wiring is trivial in the cost of a home. I'd have conduit run to the main rooms to a basement or attic so needed wires can be added and would start with CAT6.

Get a router that you can up the transmit power and some high gain ant's

that'll take care of the interference (over power them to the point their's won't work)
--
»www.change.org/petitions/create-···imcity-4


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
·surpasshosting
reply to fifty nine
I have one elderly draft N wireless router (Dlink DIR-655). We have 3 Roku boxes, a Wii, and an Xbox (w/ media center, I might add). All wirelessly connected.
Not to mention 4 smartphones and 4 laptops.

There have been times where we have had 4 HD streams (720p H.262) running simultaneously with no issues whatsoever. The old "it won't do HD" myth is bunk. It will do it just fine.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8

1 recommendation

reply to biochemistry
Wireless - subject to interference.

Wired - impervious to interference.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

I have one elderly draft N wireless router (Dlink DIR-655). We have 3 Roku boxes, a Wii, and an Xbox (w/ media center, I might add). All wirelessly connected.
Not to mention 4 smartphones and 4 laptops.

There have been times where we have had 4 HD streams (720p H.262) running simultaneously with no issues whatsoever. The old "it won't do HD" myth is bunk. It will do it just fine.

It amazes me that people will try to dispute what your real-life experience with wireless is.

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
Success with large amounts of bandwidth over wifi is definitely a YMMV issue. If there are a lot of people nearby with overlapping channels you'll likely have more pauses and jitters in streaming. If your area is relatively clear you can have a great experience.

I think that wired connections will ALWAYS work at 100% (assuming the wires were run and terminated correctly) with no issues. Wifi very well may work that well, too.


Thaler
Premium
join:2004-02-02
Los Angeles, CA
kudos:3
reply to Jack_in_VA
said by Jack_in_VA:

said by nunya:

I have one elderly draft N wireless router (Dlink DIR-655). We have 3 Roku boxes, a Wii, and an Xbox (w/ media center, I might add). All wirelessly connected.
Not to mention 4 smartphones and 4 laptops.

There have been times where we have had 4 HD streams (720p H.262) running simultaneously with no issues whatsoever. The old "it won't do HD" myth is bunk. It will do it just fine.

It amazes me that people will try to dispute what your real-life experience with wireless is.

It'll do HD...on ideal situations:
• Hardware: Router, wireless cards, etc.
• Surrounding neighborhood noise
• Layout of area

Many have run wireless and found it to not have a guaranteed quality of service for their situation. I rarely, if ever, find someone with a wired setup with a "mystery" internet slowdown that isn't because of ISP quality.

TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI

1 recommendation

reply to Jack_in_VA
said by Jack_in_VA:

said by nunya:

I have one elderly draft N wireless router (Dlink DIR-655). We have 3 Roku boxes, a Wii, and an Xbox (w/ media center, I might add). All wirelessly connected.
Not to mention 4 smartphones and 4 laptops.

There have been times where we have had 4 HD streams (720p H.262) running simultaneously with no issues whatsoever. The old "it won't do HD" myth is bunk. It will do it just fine.

It amazes me that people will try to dispute what your real-life experience with wireless is.

We can dispute it because he's in the minority. Success with wifi has a lot of variable factors. The distance from the router/AP to the other nodes, items between each nodes and the AP (walls, reinforced concrete, etc), number of APs per channel, number of electrically noisy appliances in the vicinity of the AP\nodes, and even the firmware & model revision of the AP itself all have a big effect on the amount of bandwidth and reliability you'll get out of wifi. Just because it works surprisingly well for one individual doesn't mean we can all pull our Ethernet cables out of the walls.

I'm a Sys Admin by trade, and previous to this career move I have set up more consumer networks than I care to count. I've seen people get lucky enough to have one consumer grade router cover an entire home w/o any issues, and another that can barely get by with an AP on each level. Unless all homes are constructed the same way with the same layout and the same materials, wifi will always be on a case by case basis in terms of reliability.

Wired networks will always work so long as everything is run and terminated properly.

Liberty

join:2005-06-12
Tucson, AZ
Reviews:
·Cox HSI
reply to biochemistry
"The only "future-proof" way of wiring a house doesn't involve wire at all. It's called conduit."

Yup
I lean towards flex duct vs conduit myself for low voltage - if budget & conditions can support it
Pulling dual coax, for example, in conduit can be a b*tch...

One can even even leave the duct empty except for the rope if the $$ get tight


docchat

join:2002-10-02
New York, NY
reply to biochemistry
So is there a consensus as to the recommended number of coaxial/ethernet jacks per bedroom/TV Media-Home Theater rooms?? I see lots of differing opinions. Right now in the house plans, the builder has one of each per room and I had them add one additional of each in the TV Media-Home Theater rooms. I plan on running a wired/wireless network out of the central punch panel rack with a router and switch. I'd appreciate your consensus on this. Thanks!


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

I would run 14 Cat7a, 12 RG6QS, 2 Multi-mode fibers, 3 single mode fibers, and one twinax drop(s) to each wall of each room.

I bet I can't nail a single picture frame anywhere in your house without hitting some wire.


Smokey
I'd rather be skiing
Premium
join:2003-05-20
Wild West
reply to biochemistry
If you have the room in the budget, I would look at running at least one loop of conduit to each room. This will help "future proof" the issue should you want more cable in the rooms or a change in tech. As others have said, it is pennies on the dollar on a home build and will pay off should you ever want future upgrades like home automation or security.
--
Para Bellum!!

kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL
reply to docchat
If he has a spot planned for TV, he needs some HDMI cables going from equipment (blueray, cable/satellite box, etc.) to behind TV to eliminate nasty cables. Don't forget blocking for the mount and power also.

biochemistry
Premium
join:2003-05-09
92361
reply to biochemistry
The same cables can be used for telephone as well, yes? Otherwise, I'm trying to determine why your average bedroom would need more than one run.

Jeremy W

join:2010-01-21
reply to biochemistry
5GHz 802.11n wireless solves most of the problems people in this thread have brought up with wireless. It requires a slightly more expensive wireless router, but it's absolutely worth it for the increase in reliability.

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

The old "it won't do HD" myth is bunk. It will do it just fine.

Right. There are too many variables at play to generalize that WiFi can't do HD.

First of all, there are a wide variety of bitrates used to stream "HD" video.

Secondly, WiFi performance is not the same everywhere. When I used to be in an apartment, I could not get more than 15Mbps if my life depended on it, even with the latest and greatest 802.11N hardware (did not try 5GHz though, as none of my client devices supported it). There was literally about 30 other APs within range, and it's safe to assume probably over 100 devices total (including APs, WiFi clients, cordless phones, etc).

Not everyone lives in a high-density apartment and not everyone streams unmodified Blu-Ray rips over their network, so yes, for most people, WiFi will do just fine.

It'll be up to the OP to decide what's best for him given his situation and personal needs.


EGeezer
zichrona livracha
Premium
join:2002-08-04
Midwest
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Callcentric

1 edit
reply to biochemistry
If I were building a new home, I'd consider bundled cable with two or three shielded cat6, two shielded RG6 cables and a set of speaker cables to each drop - at least one per room including bathrooms - from where I'd have a central distribution panel, punchdown board and equipment rack.

That would allow me to have wired phone, video and data systems. I'd want to have the capability for gigabit speeds, not so much for huge data transfers, but for low latency requirements like video.

The inner millionaire in me would have fiber included in case I wanted to upgrade to fiber connections. I'd also have 22AWG six conductor security wiring for security systems and fire alarms.

From a security standpoint, wired data and voice connections eliminate the risks of disruption, channel congestion and interception associated with wireless.

At any rate, I'd run all through over-sized conduit with a minimum 2" radiused elbows to allow additional wiring, and leave a pull-through cable in them for future additions.
--
Buckle Up. It makes it harder for the aliens to suck you out of your car.


djrobx
Premium
join:2000-05-31
Valencia, CA
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VOIPO
reply to biochemistry
Wireless sucks. It's never reliable enough, it's never even CLOSE to as fast as advertised, and it seems like consumer electronics manufacturers dog-pile onto the same bands in a chaotic manner.

I had a nice 900mhz cordless phone which worked great with my 2.4ghz wifi network, but it died. Good luck finding a 900mhz phone now. So I got a 5.7ghz one instead, OH WAIT, that competes with N now. And I have 2.4ghz outdoor speakers that clobber wifi-G. Oh and my Harmony 900 remote uses 2.4ghz to send signals to the base, which works intermittently due to interference from wifi (or maybe even bluetooth).

Hate, hate, hate...

I use DECA (DirecTV's MoCA) to deal with the lack of CAT5 in this house. It's better than N for streaming, that's for sure, but even that sucks compared to nice, fast, simple, reliable gigabit network I used to have in my old house.

I will, however, concede that even 100mbps is enough to stream 1080p movies with plenty of overhead.

Please, for the love of dog, run the CAT6.

--
AT&T U-Hearse - RIP Unlimited Internet 1995-2011
Rethink Billable.


Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
reply to biochemistry
Having your home wired for Ethernet can make your wireless network more flexible. Wireless repeaters are problematic, Ethernet over AC power lines can be unreliable and there really isn't anything as nice when you need to have an access point in a certain location as having a hard wired Ethernet jack to plug it into.

Different devices and tasks can benefit from having good wireless coverage as well as good wired coverage. When I am sitting in my den and need to browse the Internet on my laptop ,I don't bother plugging in. When I need to transfer 20GB of photos from that laptop to my desktop upstairs, I reach behind me and the couch and grab a cable that cuts down the time it takes to do the task by a significant amount. I've done Netflix over wireless (in a campground) and it has worked well, but I'd rather have my Internet connected media devices attached with a cable if possible. Almost everything you buy in the way of media devices is Internet connected these days. Make sure you put jacks where your TVs are going to be located.


intok

join:2012-03-15
reply to biochemistry
Go with CAT6, you can always add the wifi at any time, but it's allot of hassle to run network cables once the walls are closed.

Speed, cat6 can handle at least full Gbit speeds for your equipment. Also much better security then wifi, your neighbor's kid can use his GPU to brute force your wifi password in under an hour these days.

pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
kudos:2
Reviews:
·ooma
·Google Voice
·Comcast
·Future Nine Corp..
reply to biochemistry
I went a bit nuts when remodeling my home, 28 cat 6 drops per room, plus 8 RG 6 drops. Each bedroom has 4 IT outlets, each with 7 Cat 6 and 2 RG6 all to Keystone jacks.

I have absolutely not a single regret, other than, the almost 200 cables running to my 12U rack are a bit massive.

I have 3 PoE wireless adapters running in the home as well. Mostly for tablets, but also for a couple of Wii's.

Cost high, value ... also high. Very fast Internet, everywhere.

If I were to start again, I'd probably have additional drops in other rooms. New fridge, new washer / dryer, new electric water heater, all Internet enabled.

Restarting, I'd use Cat6A instead of Cat6.

You likely won't regret a single run to any room, provided it returns to a central location for a switch.
--
Congress could mess up a one piece jigsaw puzzle.


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
said by pandora:

I went a bit nuts

Just a "bit"?!?

New fridge, new washer / dryer, new electric water heater, all Internet enabled.

More things that need to be protected from hacking and viruses....


You likely won't regret a single run to any room, provided it returns to a central location for a switch.

Methinks most people should be well served by 1 droop/room, and up to 2 for media rooms.

I had friend who had wired internet in some part of the house (front) and wireless for the rest. Whenever the phone (also 2.4 GHz) was in use, the wireless was not usable at all.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
said by aurgathor:

I had friend who had wired internet in some part of the house (front) and wireless for the rest. Whenever the phone (also 2.4 GHz) was in use, the wireless was not usable at all.

My wireless is right next to my computer and I talk and use wifi all the time using a 2.4 GHz phone. Absolutely never had any problem at all. BTW my microwave doesn't effect it either. Old wives tales die hard apparently.

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4
reply to pandora
said by pandora:

I went a bit nuts when remodeling my home, 28 cat 6 drops per room, plus 8 RG 6 drops. Each bedroom has 4 IT outlets, each with 7 Cat 6 and 2 RG6 all to Keystone jacks.

I have absolutely not a single regret, other than, the almost 200 cables running to my 12U rack are a bit massive.

you went ballistic I would say...

»My addition will take almost 2 miles of Cat 6

everything is done way too much...

»The renovation continues ... today new 400 amp service!

his kids are into IT...playing xbox and have smartphones...see how he said IT outlets...??

I wonder if you've utilized even half the number of drops per room by now or 5-10 years from now...

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
reply to biochemistry
I can see the utility of more than one drop per "regular" room (bedrooms, non-media rooms) if it helps to avoid potentially running a cable across or around a doorway. No way I'd want to run raceway all the way around a door.

Also, for media rooms and home offices, I can see having at least two drops, maybe up to four. You may want more than one subnet for different areas. In my house I have the "main" subnet running through a web proxy for porn and ad filtering. Unfortunately, the Roku doesn't like the proxy and I had to run a non-filtered line for it (I didn't want to use another WiFi router).


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to Jack_in_VA
said by Jack_in_VA:

said by aurgathor:

I had friend who had wired internet in some part of the house (front) and wireless for the rest. Whenever the phone (also 2.4 GHz) was in use, the wireless was not usable at all.

My wireless is right next to my computer and I talk and use wifi all the time using a 2.4 GHz phone. Absolutely never had any problem at all. BTW my microwave doesn't effect it either. Old wives tales die hard apparently.

That was actual experience.

I would've pulled in some cable, but there were no easy way to do it, and he owed me too much for other stuff.
--
Wacky Races 2012!