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EGeezer
zichrona livracha
Premium
join:2002-08-04
Midwest
kudos:8
Reviews:
·Callcentric

1 edit
reply to biochemistry

Re: Benefits of Wired Network

If I were building a new home, I'd consider bundled cable with two or three shielded cat6, two shielded RG6 cables and a set of speaker cables to each drop - at least one per room including bathrooms - from where I'd have a central distribution panel, punchdown board and equipment rack.

That would allow me to have wired phone, video and data systems. I'd want to have the capability for gigabit speeds, not so much for huge data transfers, but for low latency requirements like video.

The inner millionaire in me would have fiber included in case I wanted to upgrade to fiber connections. I'd also have 22AWG six conductor security wiring for security systems and fire alarms.

From a security standpoint, wired data and voice connections eliminate the risks of disruption, channel congestion and interception associated with wireless.

At any rate, I'd run all through over-sized conduit with a minimum 2" radiused elbows to allow additional wiring, and leave a pull-through cable in them for future additions.
--
Buckle Up. It makes it harder for the aliens to suck you out of your car.



djrobx
Premium
join:2000-05-31
Valencia, CA
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VOIPO
reply to biochemistry

Wireless sucks. It's never reliable enough, it's never even CLOSE to as fast as advertised, and it seems like consumer electronics manufacturers dog-pile onto the same bands in a chaotic manner.

I had a nice 900mhz cordless phone which worked great with my 2.4ghz wifi network, but it died. Good luck finding a 900mhz phone now. So I got a 5.7ghz one instead, OH WAIT, that competes with N now. And I have 2.4ghz outdoor speakers that clobber wifi-G. Oh and my Harmony 900 remote uses 2.4ghz to send signals to the base, which works intermittently due to interference from wifi (or maybe even bluetooth).

Hate, hate, hate...

I use DECA (DirecTV's MoCA) to deal with the lack of CAT5 in this house. It's better than N for streaming, that's for sure, but even that sucks compared to nice, fast, simple, reliable gigabit network I used to have in my old house.

I will, however, concede that even 100mbps is enough to stream 1080p movies with plenty of overhead.

Please, for the love of dog, run the CAT6.

--
AT&T U-Hearse - RIP Unlimited Internet 1995-2011
Rethink Billable.



Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
reply to biochemistry

Having your home wired for Ethernet can make your wireless network more flexible. Wireless repeaters are problematic, Ethernet over AC power lines can be unreliable and there really isn't anything as nice when you need to have an access point in a certain location as having a hard wired Ethernet jack to plug it into.

Different devices and tasks can benefit from having good wireless coverage as well as good wired coverage. When I am sitting in my den and need to browse the Internet on my laptop ,I don't bother plugging in. When I need to transfer 20GB of photos from that laptop to my desktop upstairs, I reach behind me and the couch and grab a cable that cuts down the time it takes to do the task by a significant amount. I've done Netflix over wireless (in a campground) and it has worked well, but I'd rather have my Internet connected media devices attached with a cable if possible. Almost everything you buy in the way of media devices is Internet connected these days. Make sure you put jacks where your TVs are going to be located.



intok

join:2012-03-15
reply to biochemistry

Go with CAT6, you can always add the wifi at any time, but it's allot of hassle to run network cables once the walls are closed.

Speed, cat6 can handle at least full Gbit speeds for your equipment. Also much better security then wifi, your neighbor's kid can use his GPU to brute force your wifi password in under an hour these days.


pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
kudos:2
Reviews:
·ooma
·Google Voice
·Comcast
·Future Nine Corp..
reply to biochemistry

I went a bit nuts when remodeling my home, 28 cat 6 drops per room, plus 8 RG 6 drops. Each bedroom has 4 IT outlets, each with 7 Cat 6 and 2 RG6 all to Keystone jacks.

I have absolutely not a single regret, other than, the almost 200 cables running to my 12U rack are a bit massive.

I have 3 PoE wireless adapters running in the home as well. Mostly for tablets, but also for a couple of Wii's.

Cost high, value ... also high. Very fast Internet, everywhere.

If I were to start again, I'd probably have additional drops in other rooms. New fridge, new washer / dryer, new electric water heater, all Internet enabled.

Restarting, I'd use Cat6A instead of Cat6.

You likely won't regret a single run to any room, provided it returns to a central location for a switch.
--
Congress could mess up a one piece jigsaw puzzle.



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

said by pandora:

I went a bit nuts

Just a "bit"?!?

New fridge, new washer / dryer, new electric water heater, all Internet enabled.

More things that need to be protected from hacking and viruses....


You likely won't regret a single run to any room, provided it returns to a central location for a switch.

Methinks most people should be well served by 1 droop/room, and up to 2 for media rooms.

I had friend who had wired internet in some part of the house (front) and wireless for the rest. Whenever the phone (also 2.4 GHz) was in use, the wireless was not usable at all.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by aurgathor:

I had friend who had wired internet in some part of the house (front) and wireless for the rest. Whenever the phone (also 2.4 GHz) was in use, the wireless was not usable at all.

My wireless is right next to my computer and I talk and use wifi all the time using a 2.4 GHz phone. Absolutely never had any problem at all. BTW my microwave doesn't effect it either. Old wives tales die hard apparently.

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4
reply to pandora

said by pandora:

I went a bit nuts when remodeling my home, 28 cat 6 drops per room, plus 8 RG 6 drops. Each bedroom has 4 IT outlets, each with 7 Cat 6 and 2 RG6 all to Keystone jacks.

I have absolutely not a single regret, other than, the almost 200 cables running to my 12U rack are a bit massive.

you went ballistic I would say...

»My addition will take almost 2 miles of Cat 6

everything is done way too much...

»The renovation continues ... today new 400 amp service!

his kids are into IT...playing xbox and have smartphones...see how he said IT outlets...??

I wonder if you've utilized even half the number of drops per room by now or 5-10 years from now...

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus
reply to biochemistry

I can see the utility of more than one drop per "regular" room (bedrooms, non-media rooms) if it helps to avoid potentially running a cable across or around a doorway. No way I'd want to run raceway all the way around a door.

Also, for media rooms and home offices, I can see having at least two drops, maybe up to four. You may want more than one subnet for different areas. In my house I have the "main" subnet running through a web proxy for porn and ad filtering. Unfortunately, the Roku doesn't like the proxy and I had to run a non-filtered line for it (I didn't want to use another WiFi router).



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by aurgathor:

I had friend who had wired internet in some part of the house (front) and wireless for the rest. Whenever the phone (also 2.4 GHz) was in use, the wireless was not usable at all.

My wireless is right next to my computer and I talk and use wifi all the time using a 2.4 GHz phone. Absolutely never had any problem at all. BTW my microwave doesn't effect it either. Old wives tales die hard apparently.

That was actual experience.

I would've pulled in some cable, but there were no easy way to do it, and he owed me too much for other stuff.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by aurgathor:

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by aurgathor:

I had friend who had wired internet in some part of the house (front) and wireless for the rest. Whenever the phone (also 2.4 GHz) was in use, the wireless was not usable at all.

My wireless is right next to my computer and I talk and use wifi all the time using a 2.4 GHz phone. Absolutely never had any problem at all. BTW my microwave doesn't effect it either. Old wives tales die hard apparently.

That was actual experience.

I would've pulled in some cable, but there were no easy way to do it, and he owed me too much for other stuff.

My experience is also actual.


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

Chances are good that you had a different phone, different wireless router, and possibly different internet setup (it was Comcast with voice)
--
Wacky Races 2012!


Mr Matt

join:2008-01-29
Eustis, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
·Embarq Now Centu..
·Comcast
·CenturyLink
reply to biochemistry

If I was building a new home I would have a multi media quad consisting of two CAT5E and two RG6 cables installed where each television is to be located and two CAT5E cables where a telephone is to be installed.

All cables should be home run to a structured wiring cabinet. I would recommend that each CAT5E cable be terminated in an an EIA-568 configuration with a modular data plug at the structured wiring cabinet and each jack wired in an EIA-568 configuration in each room.



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

At this point, you should use at least CAT6.



DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3

If when I build a house I plan the following cabling

4x cat7 sstp to every room
1x (maybe 2x) RG-6QS to any where I might want a TV
Sit and think of how I want to do the phones for a bit. (ether some rj-11 or ip phones, though likely do some rj-11 just incase I sale some day)

All cables would terminate at the server room.

I'd plan on cable internet and sat TV (as I have now)
so I'd have a grounding block outside for the service connection to the cable provider, and a quad grounding block somewhere for the DTV

Then there'd be 4x RG-6QS from the quad block to the server room, where I'd have a SWM-16 (maybe a SWM-32)

Also I'd wire for and consider putting a OTA ant in the attic.

The cable int, sat-dish and OTA cables would all come to the server room where I'd handle the distribution.

The Cable internet would terminate at a cable modem in the server room.

The 4 sat-dish cables would term at a SWM (16 or 32) then branch out to the rest of the home (I'd have a UPS on the power supply for the SWM)

the OTA cable would be what the 2nd coax would be for.

then I wouldn't bother with deca (but the receivers would likely be HR44's so I'd have to deal with it and I'd be unable to put OTA over that coax)

with all the cabling it'd be fairly easy to change what service is going where.
--
»www.change.org/petitions/create-···imcity-4


Badonkadonk
Premium
join:2000-12-17
Naperville, IL
kudos:5

Personally, I think you're 24 connections too short. WTF are you thinking?
--
Really, Obammy? 18% tax rate and you criticised Romney??? Jackass.



natedj
Elected
Premium
join:2001-06-06
Columbia, SC
reply to biochemistry

Although I agree with 99% of the recommendations here, I have to say that most if it is going way overboard. You guys have to realize that we're the geeky 1% and the majority would not even have all those drops even if they got the cable for free. Not every one runs small servers in their homes.
My down to earth advice is to do a max of (2) drops per room but at least one per room and (1) RG6 per room. If push comes to shove you can always add a small 5 port switch if needed, to give you additional ports to any room.
I wired my house some years ago and there are some ports/rooms that have't been used in years, its good that its there but having 4-6 drops in each room is going overboard unless its a frat house.
This advice does not apply to the rooms that house the lion share of the devices like the Home Office and the Media Den.
--
Good judgement comes with experience...Experience comes after bad judgements



DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to Badonkadonk

said by Badonkadonk:

Personally, I think you're 24 connections too short. WTF are you thinking?

You're right should be 8 not 4 per room

and I totally forgot to mention adding in a 6513e switch. (might wanta put that into the home loan.)
--
»www.change.org/petitions/create-···imcity-4

Badonkadonk
Premium
join:2000-12-17
Naperville, IL
kudos:5

I was kidding. In all seriousness, you need 28 connections per room. That would be the more sensible approach. j/k
--
Really, Obammy? 18% tax rate and you criticised Romney??? Jackass.


medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4

1 recommendation

said by Badonkadonk:

I was kidding. In all seriousness, you need 28 connections per room. That would be the more sensible approach. j/k

just like what pandora See Profile did...

add to that HDMI, DVI, fiber, Composite, Toslink and every cable available in the market for audio, video, network, security etc....


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3

said by medbuyer:

said by Badonkadonk:

I was kidding. In all seriousness, you need 28 connections per room. That would be the more sensible approach. j/k

just like what pandora See Profile did...

add to that HDMI, DVI, fiber, Composite, Toslink and every cable available in the market for audio, video, network, security etc....

Naw just do cat7, you can then get HDMI to rj-45 converters

then you can get a real beefy USP int he server room and use some form of controller setup, this way your DVR's and such are protected.
--
»www.change.org/petitions/create-···imcity-4


Bamafan2277

join:2008-09-20
Jeffersonville, IN

1 recommendation

reply to biochemistry

I am currently having a home built and had the builder put 3 boxes in the master bedroom with each getting 3 cat 6 wires and 1 coax. 3 boxes in the living room with the same configuration. 1 in the kitchen and 1 in each of the other 2 bedrooms. Also had a outlet placed next to each box.

Everything will terminate in my garage on the wall of my closet holding the furnace and water heater where I will be installing my network equipment and a punchdown for the phone services.

Total cost was $300 to the cost of my house. Eliminating the hassle of wireless deadspots Priceless.


medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4

said by Bamafan2277:

Everything will terminate in my garage on the wall of my closet holding the furnace and water heater where I will be installing my network equipment and a punchdown for the phone services.

why would you want to terminate it from the garage? and on the wall of your furnace and water heater closet?

the heat inside the garage might add to the heat generated by your equipment would or might result to an early equipment failure...

I'd rather put it in a closet INSIDE the house where temps are more manageable....

but then again, I've seen some people do it with success...


Bamafan2277

join:2008-09-20
Jeffersonville, IN

the garage is insulated with closed cell spray foam as is the rest of the house. It will be a small temp difference compaired to the rest of the house and it was the location where all utlities were coming in.


kevnich24

join:2006-04-19
Mulberry, FL
reply to biochemistry

Yes, the optimal way to run your wiring is with atleast 1 RG6 plus 1-2 cat6 to each room. I say minimum of 2 cat6 to each room with a few extra thrown in to your entertainment/living room and put 4 cat6 on each side of the wall plus 2 RG6 on each side of the wall. That way your not limiting your furniture arrangement. Run all the cable to a home run media box in one of your closets and you can distribute whatever signal you want, be it telephone, tv or data. I have one of my runs in my kitchen as a phone outlet with a wireless phone and 3 others around the house for data jacks. I have a centralized WAP for wireless.


kevnich24

join:2006-04-19
Mulberry, FL
reply to TheMG

As far as Pandora's remodel - my opinion is the guy is completely nuts. Only a business needs that much wiring installed in a house. But hey, nice that some people have alot of money to throw out. That's strictly my opinion. 28 cat6 runs to each ROOM. Good golly. I have 22 in my entire house (2 to each room, 4 to the main living area and 8 in my den) and I thought that was a lot but I am glad I did even if some never get used, atleast I have the option if the need ever arises.


Beezel

join:2008-12-15
Las Vegas, NV
reply to DarkLogix

said by DarkLogix:

said by medbuyer:

said by Badonkadonk:

I was kidding. In all seriousness, you need 28 connections per room. That would be the more sensible approach. j/k

just like what pandora See Profile did...

add to that HDMI, DVI, fiber, Composite, Toslink and every cable available in the market for audio, video, network, security etc....

Naw just do cat7, you can then get HDMI to rj-45 converters

Cat 7 standard isn't really unified yet and specifications may change before it is unified. So Cat 6e would be just fine.

slckusr
Premium
join:2003-03-17
Greenville, SC
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to biochemistry

Wires are faster and more efficient if that doesnt matter wired is the MOST SECURE. No one is going to park their van and hack into your wired network without you having ome knowledge.


switchman

join:1999-11-06

1 recommendation

reply to biochemistry

Do what you want, but I would put at least 2xCat6a and 2xRG6 Quad Shield to each room. The 6a will let you run 10Ge in the future if you need to. Home run it all back to a central location.



kontos
xyzzy

join:2001-10-04
West Henrietta, NY
reply to medbuyer

said by medbuyer:

I was lucky to be able to build my network [2 cate5e, 2 rg6 per room / location] when our house was being built but if I had to go back in time, I would have added more wires.

You can cross that bridge when you come to it for $20/room
D-Link GO-SW-5G »www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a···Parent=1