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salam2009

join:2013-04-29

[Windows] How to bond 2 WANs into single link to double band

Hey guys,
I have peplink balance 30 & netgear srx5308 routers with dual integrated NICs on my PC.
Is there any way possible to bond my 3 WANs that is taken from the same ISP with 2Mbit/s each into single connection for my own PC so the total will be 6 Mbit/s ??
I've heard about Sharedband but I need to know afew things before I try them out, so if anyone knows about them please let me know.
Your help would be greatly appreciated!
Salaam



Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5

Bonding has to be done at the ISP level not at your level. I doubt if this is possible.



mackey
Premium
join:2007-08-20
kudos:12
reply to salam2009

Running 3x streams (i.e. downloading 3 files simultaneously) at 2 mbps each is not a problem, any load balancing firewall/router can do that.

Combining them into a single 6 mbps stream requires either ISP support, or a VPN which allows 3 concurrent connections and takes care of the combining/balancing. It cannot be done without one of those.

/M


Aranarth

join:2011-11-04
Stanwood, MI
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to salam2009

Looks like this is third party channel bonding or more like "remote wan bonding".

From their pdf:
Sharedband versus load balancing:
Load balancing solutions are available that allow multiple Broadband connections to be used. They typically balance sessions, whereby one of the lines is selected to download a particular file, the next download uses the next line etc. Where customers only have small outgoing traffic transactions such as web usage, this is a great solution. However, where a single task (session) requires the full capacity of all lines, a true bonding solution such as Sharedband is required. Where customers wish to have incoming services such as VPN, mail and web servers, they will need to be configured to use the public IP address of one of the lines. If a line fails the servers will need to be re-configured to use one of the other line’s public IP addresses. For most businesses this re-configuration in event of a failure is too complex. With Sharedband’s technology a single session can use all capacity, and line failures are seamless as the public IP addresses are at the AS, not individual lines.



eibgrad

join:2010-03-15

2 edits
reply to salam2009

SB seems interesting, and relatively straight-forward from the customer’s perspective. You have to use their preconfigured SB routers, which then manage your ISP connections locally, forward/tunnel the traffic to their aggregation server(s), and finally drop your traffic on the internet as a single connection to the destination.

I would definitely check out their terms of service and known limitations.

»us.store.sharedband.com/index.php?stage=9

They claim 25 bytes of overhead per packet. Not sure how this system would affect remote access (port forwarding) either. Remember, they manage the public IP at the aggregation server! I wouldn’t be surprised if you receive a PRIVATE ip address unless you specifically request otherwise. The cheapest plan (250GB) is also $12.50 per line, so $37.50 for the 3 WANs (and surely some fees, taxes), and I don’t see any specific hardware costs wrt the SB routers.

If you’re willing to absorb the monthly cost, and if they don’t charge for the SB routers, it might be worth a trial period, esp. if you have no other options for better performance directly from the ISP.


salam2009

join:2013-04-29

4 edits
reply to Anav

said by Anav:

Bonding has to be done at the ISP level not at your level. I doubt if this is possible.

I know but my ISP doesn't support MLPPP for bonding!

said by mackey:

Running 3x streams (i.e. downloading 3 files simultaneously) at 2 mbps each is not a problem, any load balancing firewall/router can do that.

Combining them into a single 6 mbps stream requires either ISP support, or a VPN which allows 3 concurrent connections and takes care of the combining/balancing. It cannot be done without one of those.

/M

My ISP can't do it. using VPN (like SharedBand) is risky & needs monthly fee (which is reasonable though). It might be slow for long-distance users away from their servers,
their must-buy routers have limitations like max data can't exceed 24 Mbps! However, it's an excellent service for those who won't be affected by these restrictions.
As for running 3x streams, I'm gonna give it a try today!
So wish me luck

said by Aranarth:

Looks like this is third party channel bonding or more like "remote wan bonding".

From their pdf:
Sharedband versus load balancing:
Load balancing solutions are available that allow multiple Broadband connections to be used. They typically balance sessions, whereby one of the lines is selected to download a particular file, the next download uses the next line etc. Where customers only have small outgoing traffic transactions such as web usage, this is a great solution. However, where a single task (session) requires the full capacity of all lines, a true bonding solution such as Sharedband is required. Where customers wish to have incoming services such as VPN, mail and web servers, they will need to be configured to use the public IP address of one of the lines. If a line fails the servers will need to be re-configured to use one of the other line’s public IP addresses. For most businesses this re-configuration in event of a failure is too complex. With Sharedband’s technology a single session can use all capacity, and line failures are seamless as the public IP addresses are at the AS, not individual lines.

Interesting Infos! too bad I can't try them due to their restrictions!
Thanks for sharing this though.

said by eibgrad:

SB seems interesting, and relatively straight-forward from the customer’s perspective. You have to use their preconfigured SB routers, which then manage your ISP connections locally, forward/tunnel the traffic to their aggregation server(s), and finally drop your traffic on the internet as a single connection to the destination.

I would definitely check out their terms of service and known limitations.

»us.store.sharedband.com/index.php?stage=9

They claim 25 bytes of overhead per packet. Not sure how this system would affect remote access (port forwarding) either. Remember, they manage the public IP at the aggregation server! I wouldn’t be surprised if you receive a PRIVATE ip address unless you specifically request otherwise. The cheapest plan (250GB) is also $12.50 per line, so $37.50 for the 3 WANs (and surely some fees, taxes), and I don’t see any specific hardware costs wrt the SB routers.

If you’re willing to absorb the monthly cost, and if they don’t charge for the SB routers, it might be worth a trial period, esp. if you have no other options for better performance directly from the ISP.

As tempting as it sounds, but I'll have to pass due to the mentioned reasons above.
Thanks alot for sharing it though!
Regards,
Salaam

salam2009

join:2013-04-29

4 edits
reply to mackey

said by mackey:

Running 3x streams (i.e. downloading 3 files simultaneously) at 2 mbps each is not a problem, any load balancing firewall/router can do that.

Combining them into a single 6 mbps stream requires either ISP support, or a VPN which allows 3 concurrent connections and takes care of the combining/balancing. It cannot be done without one of those.

/M

Mackey, you ROCK!!
I didn't know load balancing can do this until you mentioned it.
Still, 1 problem. Sometimes it works & sometimes it doesn't!
Why is this happening?!
BTW, my router algorithm is set to "weighted balance".
Thank you so much for this enormous help!
Salaam

jimbopalmer
Tsar of all the Rushers

join:2008-06-02
Greenwood, MS
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to salam2009

An RV016 can bond 2 to 7 WAN ports.to look like one default gateway to the PC.

»www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps9···dex.html
--
I tried to remain child-like, all I achieved was childish.


Aranarth

join:2011-11-04
Stanwood, MI
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to salam2009

With load balancing each item accessing the internet will get its own stream. So for three 3mbps second connections the first 3 items accessing the internet will each get 2mbps. (a file download, windows update, youtube video) After that each new stream will split one of those streams. If you have qos configured it will give the youtube a full wan connection until the other two are maxed out and then split the connection the youtube video is on.

Note for torrent or download using a download manager where they can use multiple streams you can still get the maximum your connections can provide.

For more than two wan connections I would use this:
»www.amazon.com/TP-Link-TL-R470T-···multiwan


salam2009

join:2013-04-29

2 edits

said by Aranarth:

With load balancing each item accessing the internet will get its own stream. So for three 3mbps second connections the first 3 items accessing the internet will each get 2mbps. (a file download, windows update, youtube video) After that each new stream will split one of those streams. If you have qos configured it will give the youtube a full wan connection until the other two are maxed out and then split the connection the youtube video is on.

Note for torrent or download using a download manager where they can use multiple streams you can still get the maximum your connections can provide.

For more than two wan connections I would use this:
»www.amazon.com/TP-Link-TL-R470T-···multiwan

Yea but it doesn't always work that way like when downloading 3 files simultaneously by a download manager, instead of getting 3 WANs speed I get the speed of 1 !
As for the QoS-Application, why it's empty in my router (blank page)?!
To be honest, I'm confused now!

salam2009

join:2013-04-29

1 edit
reply to jimbopalmer

said by jimbopalmer:

An RV016 can bond 2 to 7 WAN ports.to look like one default gateway to the PC.

»www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps9···dex.html

Are you sure?! Cause it looks like it works as load balancing not bonding!
That's what they say.

jimbopalmer
Tsar of all the Rushers

join:2008-06-02
Greenwood, MS
kudos:2

Sorry, yes load balancing.



gatorkram
Need for Speed
Premium
join:2002-07-22
Winterville, NC
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to salam2009

I have an rv016, and it works really well. The only drawback now is it's starting to show its age, only having 10/100 ports on it.

I used it with two 50/3 connections, and I think it was the bottle neck limiting combined speeds to 75-80mbit in testing.

Upload speeds were hitting 6 easy though.

As was stated before, this device isn't bonding the links, only load balancing, which is just fine for most applications, and no special software is needed if its capable of using multiple connections on it's own, such as web browsing.

It is of course presented as one device, and one private IP to your network.
--
What the heck is a GatorKram? »www.gatorkram.com


Aranarth

join:2011-11-04
Stanwood, MI
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to salam2009

said by salam2009 See Profile

Yea but it doesn't always work that way like when downloading 3 files simultaneously by a download manager, instead of getting 3 WANs speed I get the speed of 1 !
As for the QoS-Application, why it's empty in my router (blank page)?!
To be honest, I'm confused now!
[/BQUOTE :

Um what?!
If you download 3 files each stream would get a different wan connection and you would still get 3x2Mbps = 6Mbps total.

Btw the IP protocol itself is "load balancing" where if you download 10 things at once on a single wan connection each one will attempt download at 10% maximum speed of the connection. Then if some of the servers you are connection to can provide more bandwidth and others can't and therefore provide less then you will some streams moving faster then others. You still aren't wasting any bandwidth because 100% of the available bandwidth (minus the overhead) will be used.

This is all automatic.

This is also why in most cases while the maximum bandwidth for a SINGLE stream is 2Mbps in your case, you typically have so many streams coming in and out (such as loading a webpage) the other two wan connections are NOT wasted in a load balancing scenario.

Even better if you have multiple machines sharing the load balanced connection it will still appear that you have a 6Mbps connection, just that the max bandwidth for a single stream will be 2Mbps.

Besides, those few times you are downloading a huge file such as a linux iso as long as you use a download manager that can split the download up into multiple streams or use torrent which does so automatically, you will still see the entire 6Mbps.

If you understand the above, you will see that you can ignore QOS for now.


salam2009

join:2013-04-29

said by Aranarth:

said by salam2009 See Profile

Yea but it doesn't always work that way like when downloading 3 files simultaneously by a download manager, instead of getting 3 WANs speed I get the speed of 1 !
As for the QoS-Application, why it's empty in my router (blank page)?!
To be honest, I'm confused now!
[/BQUOTE :

Um what?!
If you download 3 files each stream would get a different wan connection and you would still get 3x2Mbps = 6Mbps total.

Btw the IP protocol itself is "load balancing" where if you download 10 things at once on a single wan connection each one will attempt download at 10% maximum speed of the connection. Then if some of the servers you are connection to can provide more bandwidth and others can't and therefore provide less then you will some streams moving faster then others. You still aren't wasting any bandwidth because 100% of the available bandwidth (minus the overhead) will be used.

This is all automatic.

This is also why in most cases while the maximum bandwidth for a SINGLE stream is 2Mbps in your case, you typically have so many streams coming in and out (such as loading a webpage) the other two wan connections are NOT wasted in a load balancing scenario.

Even better if you have multiple machines sharing the load balanced connection it will still appear that you have a 6Mbps connection, just that the max bandwidth for a single stream will be 2Mbps.

Besides, those few times you are downloading a huge file such as a linux iso as long as you use a download manager that can split the download up into multiple streams or use torrent which does so automatically, you will still see the entire 6Mbps.

If you understand the above, you will see that you can ignore QOS for now.

I know the concept of Load balancing but it just worked the first time (3 files were getting each WAN speed separately) then it started to work as if I'm using 1 WAN, so 3 files are sharing 2Mbps now!
I use the latest version of IDM & the links are direct from Apple servers.
Can u please tell me what's goin on?