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AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL
reply to patcat88

Re: [general] Why don't houses in the south have basements

said by patcat88:

no attic means flatroof or too small to put anything in it? no gutters? wouldnt that rot the siding and kill the grass under the edge?

You truncated a few others from his post, but if you add back in stucco you've just described most houses in South Florida. There is no siding to rot (stucco) and the soil, if you can call it that, is mostly sand based and drains very rapidly unless there's a lot of rapid rain. With no gutters, since most houses are on slabs, you run more of a risk of erosion causing long term damage.

Most A/C compressors are mounted on their own slab here in Florida, Las Vegas seems to favor the roof. It could be because Las Vegas is generally more windy, or maybe thats just how they started and kept doing it the same way. I can say most places don't have basements, and it generally is due to the soil and very high water table. The few places that do have basements, generally need to actively maintain the environment.

patcat88

join:2002-04-05
Jamaica, NY
kudos:1

said by AVonGauss:

said by patcat88:

no attic means flatroof or too small to put anything in it? no gutters? wouldnt that rot the siding and kill the grass under the edge?

You truncated a few others from his post, but if you add back in stucco you've just described most houses in South Florida. There is no siding to rot (stucco) and the soil, if you can call it that, is mostly sand based and drains very rapidly unless there's a lot of rapid rain.

I didnt have a question over stucco, so I removed it.

scott_urman

join:2002-07-18
San Mateo, CA
reply to IowaCowboy

Nobody seems to have mentioned California yet, here in the Bay Area nobody has basements either (unless the house is built into the hill, then the bottom level is kind of a basement). We keep our washers and dryers inside but the electrical panel is outside.


patcat88

join:2002-04-05
Jamaica, NY
kudos:1

said by scott_urman:

Nobody seems to have mentioned California yet, here in the Bay Area nobody has basements either (unless the house is built into the hill, then the bottom level is kind of a basement). We keep our washers and dryers inside but the electrical panel is outside.

So with how popular outdoor panels are in some parts of the USA, so do breakers prematurely trip when they have a southern exposure and turn into an oven in the southern sun?

I know same argument can be made about indoor panels with an AC register blowing at them, or in a cold basement.

sk1939
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said by patcat88:

I know same argument can be made about indoor panels with an AC register blowing at them, or in a cold basement.

Not really, indoor temperatures never get cold enough for them for it to be a problem, unless your in Alaska. Your pipes would be well past frozen at the temperature required for breakers to malfunction.


nunya
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O Fallon, MO
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reply to patcat88

Yes they do. I have a national client with outdoor climate controlled "kiosks". They always have a breaker panel next to them with 20A GFCI breakers. When it gets into the 100's, the units on Southern exposed walls trip regularly. These units are typically pulling down 14-16A maximum when the A/C is running.

I think it's a combination of the high ambient temperature, and the continuous draw.



abguy

@verizon.net
reply to IowaCowboy

Third post in thread by robbin explains it.

In colder climes, the frost line is so low that you're nearly building a basement anyway, because your foundation has to go several feet below grade to avoid frost heave.

So the additional expense isn't that great to build semi-usable space. This is why old basements tend to have low ceilings--they were built mainly as unfinished space just to achieve a footing below the frost line. The (important) bonus is that your water-supply pipes won't freeze in a basement like they would in crawl space. A major concern up north.

None of this is to say that you can't have a basement down south--pay for it and you can have it. It's just not necessary. And of course (as several have noted) there are sometimes specific local conditions which prevent or require basements.



Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
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join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
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1 edit
reply to AVonGauss

said by AVonGauss:

I can say most places don't have basements, and it generally is due to the soil and very high water table. The few places that do have basements, generally need to actively maintain the environment.

Generally that's not accurate.

»www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/···20110531
quote:
Nationally, 42 percent of new homes had basements in 1992, according to the Census survey, compared to 30 percent in 2009.
I have lived in a house (North Metro Atlanta) with a dry basement for 25+ Years now and nothing has to be done to or for the basement in order to keep it actively that way. It is passively dry all Year long.
--
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AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL

said by Doctor Olds:

Generally that's not accurate.

»www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/···20110531

quote:
Nationally, 42 percent of new homes had basements in 1992, according to the Census survey, compared to 30 percent in 2009.
I have lived in a house with a dry basement for 25+ Years now and nothing has to be done to or for the basement in order to keep it actively that way. It is passively drive all Year long.

... in South Florida?


54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL

said by AVonGauss:

... in South Florida?

In South Florida basements are known as swimming pools.


Doctor Olds
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reply to AVonGauss

said by AVonGauss:

... in South Florida?

No, North Metro Atlanta, one State above Florida.

AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL

Understood, my post was talking specifically about South Florida.


Mr Matt

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reply to IowaCowboy

Here in Central Florida many builders offer optional bonus rooms rather than basements. Bonus rooms are typically constructed over the garage and in some cases over several bedrooms in the back of the house. Basements are a problem here because during tropical storms the water table can rapidly increase above the ground level causing ponding or puddling which is a form of flooding. Builders will typically fill in the area where ponding occurs to raise the elevation of the slab, preventing ground water from entering the house. That said during my search for a new home I was shown with two houses with walk out basements. One side of the basement is excavated into a hill and the other side accessible to ground level through standard or sliding glass doors.