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Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

Marinate bone-in-pork?

Since it's not until tomorrow what should I marinate it with since I have only a few bit of spices.



signmeuptoo
Bless you Howie
Premium
join:2001-11-22
NanoParticle
kudos:5

Some cuts of pork, turkey, and even chicken, benefit from marination, but brining might be best. If it is a butt or shoulder, make a brine from apple juice, cider vinegar, and kosher salt. Look up on the webs how much salt to use.

If it is a chop or a loin, only marinate for up to 6 hours if the marinade is strong...
--
Join Teams Helix and Discovery. Rest in Peace, Leonard David Smith, my best friend, you are missed badly! Rest in peace, Pop, glad our last years were good. Please pray for Colin, he has ependymoma, a brain cancer, donate to a children's Hospital.



Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

yeah it's a butt cut



signmeuptoo
Bless you Howie
Premium
join:2001-11-22
NanoParticle
kudos:5
reply to Subaru

Ok, go to food network's site, and look at brining. I make carnitas sometimes and brine it.

You don't really brine something thick like a butt or shoulder. Brining is done overnight or up to 2 or 3 days...



Xioden
Premium
join:2008-06-10
Monticello, NY
kudos:1
reply to Subaru

What you plan to make will change greatly what you should do to it beforehand.



old_tech
Premium
join:2013-03-31
Springfield, IL
reply to Subaru

If you have ground red pepper, black pepper, salt, brown sugar, ground mustard seed, cumin, just make a dry rub. Really depends on what you mean by a bit of spices.

List what you have in your cabinet, and we can go from there. Even if all you have is Salt, Pepper, bottle of Mustard in the fridge, and some OJ, you could go that route, and still get a decent flavor, when cooked low on 275 for say 4 hours.



Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

1 edit

This is what I have..

Ground Garlic
ground black pepper
onion powder
lawry's seasoned salt
adobo
crushed red pepper
cayenne pepper
chopped onion
garlic powder
garlic salt
curry powder
paprika
all spice
sea salt
mrs. dash - original blend
pork seasoning
thyme leaves
ground cloves
celery salt
old bay seasoning
whole oregano
mustard
Lawry's signature steakhouse
--
It's NOT Ni-kon It's NE-KON!




LG is NOT Lifes Good It's Lucky Goldstar!



old_tech
Premium
join:2013-03-31
Springfield, IL

Then you have enough to do a dry rub, or coat. First Salt & Pepper the meat, then you can rub on the Mustard and leave it at that.

It is when you go overboard in seasoning, then it becomes either bland, or noticeable to the taste buds, that it was over seasoned.



Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

how long should I let it sit for?



Xioden
Premium
join:2008-06-10
Monticello, NY
kudos:1

If you plan to leave it sitting for a while with a dry rub use little or no salt. Salt will draw out the moisture from the meat (so add the salt before cooking). Otherwise just however long you want really. Just make extra rub and put it aside to apply again right before you cook.

Note that the Lawry's and Mrs. dash likely have salt as the main ingredient if you decide to use those.



old_tech
Premium
join:2013-03-31
Springfield, IL
reply to Subaru

Just put on it, when the oven has pre-heated, place it in the oven and let it roast. Great thing about using what I posted, is that you should not let it set overnight in the fridge, but will cook into the meat, if you do a low heat (275) slow roast.



CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to Xioden

Actually- a simple and easy 'brine' for meats (from prime rib to chicken. turkey, and pork) is to salt with kosher salt and let it sit for a day - or even only a few hours. Water initially comes out - mixed with the sodium then gets taken back in - just like in a regular brine.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain



Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1
reply to old_tech

said by old_tech:

Just put on it, when the oven has pre-heated, place it in the oven and let it roast. Great thing about using what I posted, is that you should not let it set overnight in the fridge, but will cook into the meat, if you do a low heat (275) slow roast.

Wow good thing I keep a thermometer in the oven 275 setting just hardly gets up past 240.
--
It's NOT Ni-kon It's NE-KON!




LG is NOT Lifes Good It's Lucky Goldstar!



old_tech
Premium
join:2013-03-31
Springfield, IL

Some non electronic ovens have an adjustment inside the shaft for the oven, that allows you to adjust the temp. Also a countertop steam cooker works well, and the meat is a lot more moist.



Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

1 edit

said by old_tech:

Some non electronic ovens have an adjustment inside the shaft for the oven, that allows you to adjust the temp. Also a countertop steam cooker works well, and the meat is a lot more moist.

Well not long to go but normal to have a bunch of water in the roasting pan now? They do look very tender now.



jadinolf
I Love You Fred
Premium
join:2005-07-09
Ojai, CA
kudos:8
Reviews:
·DSL EXTREME

said by Subaru:

said by old_tech:

Some non electronic ovens have an adjustment inside the shaft for the oven, that allows you to adjust the temp. Also a countertop steam cooker works well, and the meat is a lot more moist.

Well not long to go but normal to have a bunch of water in the roasting pan now? They do look very tender now.


When do you want us over?
--
Printed on 100% recycled bytes


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

it's smelling good now another 50 min left.



old_tech
Premium
join:2013-03-31
Springfield, IL
reply to Subaru

Yes, you end up with some, but not that much liquid. Must have had a lot of fat on it. You did not add any water or broth to it, before cooking, did you?



Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

nope no water or anything, a few pieces did have a fair amount of fat on it.



old_tech
Premium
join:2013-03-31
Springfield, IL
reply to Subaru

The Dry rub mix that I use for Pork, is the following:

1/4 Cup of Brown sugar
1/8 tsp of Ground Red Pepper
1/4 tsp of Ground Mustard
1/4 tsp of Onion Powder
about 1/4 to 1/2 tsp of fresh Ground Pepper
1/8 to 1/4 tsp of fresh Ground Salt
1/8 to 1/4 tsp of Cumin

This will do about five chops, or at least two racks of ribs, or Country Ribs.

I had to play with the brown sugar quantity, due to the first time I did that mix, I ended up with too much liquid sugar. Great mix for in the oven on a slow roast with foil covering the meat in a deep cookie sheet (airbake pans work great for this).

If placing on the grill, you have to do the mix lightly coating over the meat, let it soak in at least 6 hours in the fridge, before throwing on the grill in a foil wrap, then remove from the foil after cooking for 4 hours off of the side of the coals, or on a low heat on a gas grill.

Finish up directly over the coals or medium heat for about 30 min's, to give a bark on the meat.



Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

said by old_tech:

The Dry rub mix that I use for Pork, is the following:

1/4 Cup of Brown sugar
1/8 tsp of Ground Red Pepper
1/4 tsp of Ground Mustard
1/4 tsp of Onion Powder
about 1/4 to 1/2 tsp of fresh Ground Pepper
1/8 to 1/4 tsp of fresh Ground Salt
1/8 to 1/4 tsp of Cumin

This will do about five chops, or at least two racks of ribs, or Country Ribs.

I had to play with the brown sugar quantity, due to the first time I did that mix, I ended up with too much liquid sugar. Great mix for in the oven on a slow roast, but for the grill, you have to do the mix lightly, let it soak in at least 6 hours before throwing on the grill in a foil wrap, then remove from the foil after cooking for 4 hours off of the side of the coals, or on a low heat on a gas grill.

Finish up directly over the coals or medium heat for about 30 min's, to give a bark on the meat.

I might have to try that, but first I have to get another grill.
--
It's NOT Ni-kon It's NE-KON!




LG is NOT Lifes Good It's Lucky Goldstar!



old_tech
Premium
join:2013-03-31
Springfield, IL

I used that mix on some chops, that I did in our oven last night. Went good with the loaded Scalloped potatoes that I fixed to go with them also.

I need to get a new grill also, since to replace the burners, bottom grid, ceramic briquettes, and top grills, is just getting too expensive to do every couple of years, on our now ten year old Fiesta that we have.

I have been looking at going with the Weber Q300 series, since it is built to last, and loved using the one that my mother-in-law had.



Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1

This would be sweet on the grill



I'm looking at a small webber I just hope it wont get trashed like the last one.



battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
reply to old_tech

+++++++++1 on the mustard.



Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:9
reply to old_tech

Go with a Weber. My Weber is now 15 years old. My grill has the original burners & igniter & still goes strong. I've replace the "Flavorizer" bars twice, the grill cover twice & had to update the connection for the new style propane tanks. It looks like a veteran after returning from many battles, but I love it.



Xioden
Premium
join:2008-06-10
Monticello, NY
kudos:1
reply to CylonRed

Which is not what you want when you are doing a dry rub. With a brine you want it fully submerged and covered with the brine. A dry rub the moisture that is pulled out by the salt will just drip to the bottom of whatever it is in leaving it dry.



footballdude
Premium
join:2002-08-13
Imperial, MO
reply to Subaru

I always use a dry rub when I grill pork. If you're roasting pork or cooking in a pan, cut up some onions and apples and let them cook with the pork. Amazing combo.
--
“I had to adjust my halo as I was machine-gunning hogs.” - Ted Nugent



geh
Premium
join:2012-04-08
U.S.A.
reply to Subaru

Butt is a great cut of pork, very flavorful, lots of character. just remember, with more inexpensive cuts of fibrous meat, you are really better off cooking very slowly and bringing to a higher final cook temp than you would a leaner cut. When I cook pork butt, I typically get it to at least 190. This melts all that connective tissue which makes the pork be fall apart juicy and awesome.

One of my favorite rubs for pork is simple, garlic salt and paprika.



footballdude
Premium
join:2002-08-13
Imperial, MO

Two of my favorite rubs.


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1
reply to geh

said by geh:

Butt is a great cut of pork, very flavorful, lots of character. just remember, with more inexpensive cuts of fibrous meat, you are really better off cooking very slowly and bringing to a higher final cook temp than you would a leaner cut. When I cook pork butt, I typically get it to at least 190. This melts all that connective tissue which makes the pork be fall apart juicy and awesome.

One of my favorite rubs for pork is simple, garlic salt and paprika.

most of mine fell apart yesterday just trying to pick it up
--
It's NOT Ni-kon It's NE-KON!




LG is NOT Lifes Good It's Lucky Goldstar!