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Livadia

join:2007-12-18
Canada

advice needed for a new computer

It has been quite some time since I built my current computer, so I think the time has come to replace it. I need some advice on (mostly) motherboard, but any opinion is welcome.
What I need or intend to use it for:
-- it is mostly for development use, no video/picture editing, no video games. So, a just decent video adapter will suffice.
-- I am looking for an i5/i7. Not that I need that i7 performance per se, but an i7 may mean I could hold on to it a bit longer.
-- I do need lots of RAM, at least 16GB
-- large disk, minimum 1TB, preferably 2TB.
-- Gb ethernet, wifi on MB would be nice, as some work I am currently doing involves wifi.
-- here is the difficult part as regards to the MB; It has to have support for linux.

So, any ideas on which motherboard should I settle on?



psafux
Premium,VIP
join:2005-11-10
kudos:2

Look for any motherboard that supports 16GB memory and has on-board wireless if that is desired. Add-on wireless cards typically have better range and performance - just a heads up.

The rest of your requirements will be met by any modern motherboard.

said by Livadia:

-- here is the difficult part as regards to the MB; It has to have support for linux.

The motherboard doesn't care which OS is installed on the hard drive.

Livadia

join:2007-12-18
Canada

said by psafux:

Look for any motherboard that supports 16GB memory and has on-board wireless if that is desired. Add-on wireless cards typically have better range and performance - just a heads up.

The rest of your requirements will be met by any modern motherboard.

said by Livadia:

-- here is the difficult part as regards to the MB; It has to have support for linux.

The motherboard doesn't care which OS is installed on the hard drive.

Thank you for your reply. Yes, a wireless card may be a better option, so that I do not limit myself. However, and this applies to my original comment on linux, as well. I want to know that the MB I buy (and that wireless card) have all linux drivers needed. The MB may not care on which OS is on the drive, the OS though does need drivers to run on that MB.

bbear2
Premium
join:2003-10-06
94045
kudos:5

1 recommendation

reply to Livadia

said by Livadia:

...
-- I am looking for an i5/i7. Not that I need that i7 performance per se, but an i7 may mean I could hold on to it a bit longer.

So, any ideas on which motherboard should I settle on?

I hear this often from customers who "want it to last longer" and hence they think buying i7 will do that for them. The truth of the matter is, it probably won't - but it's dependent upon other future needs you might have. Plus, you end up paying more for a particular component that you'll likely never benefit from unless your application changes. The processor performance is but one these things that "age" over time. There are many other things that go old too. For example, memory size, USB2.0 (now 3.0), 20 pin power connectors (now 24), disk size, IDE and SATA 1, 2 (now 3), etc.

IMHO, it never really works out well trying to future proof your new build with only a higher end CPU. If you really want a "longer" lasting build (which I don't think it's worth the money only for that), then be sure to get the latest and greatest technology on all fronts, not only the CPU.

Things to consider: enough USB3.0 ports; a decent PS with 24 pin connector and 4/4 +12v for video with separate +12 rails, 500W minimum, 80Plus efficiency rating; SATA3 interfaces and at least 6 of them; at least 8G DDR3 memory but capable to handle 16G or more; enough PCIe slots for expansion, DDR5 for the video w/1G min., etc.


psafux
Premium,VIP
join:2005-11-10
kudos:2
reply to Livadia

said by Livadia:

The MB may not care on which OS is on the drive, the OS though does need drivers to run on that MB.

I would encourage you to narrow down your choices to maybe 3-5 boards you really like and then check the manufacturer's website for drivers. If the board mfg doesn't have Linux drivers the manufacturer of the component may.

Livadia

join:2007-12-18
Canada

said by psafux:

said by Livadia:

The MB may not care on which OS is on the drive, the OS though does need drivers to run on that MB.

I would encourage you to narrow down your choices to maybe 3-5 boards you really like and then check the manufacturer's website for drivers. If the board mfg doesn't have Linux drivers the manufacturer of the component may.

Well, yes, I suppsoe this is what one should do. I was just hoping that one would say "I have this MB and having no problems finding drivers for linux".


psafux
Premium,VIP
join:2005-11-10
kudos:2

said by Livadia:

Well, yes, I suppsoe this is what one should do. I was just hoping that one would say "I have this MB and having no problems finding drivers for linux".

That may happen, you never know.


berserken

join:2011-03-27
Oakland, CA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Livadia

ASUS P8Z68 DELUXE/GEN3
I have this MB and having no problems finding drivers for linux.



At your service.

This mobo is a little out of your spec but, generally, I don't do anything but install a Linux distribution (Mandriva, Puppy) and the kernel has a module/driver for the hardware components of whatever motherboard I am using.

(I did have some problems with an ide controller chipset driver, marvell, perhaps, more than a few years ago.)

What might be a good idea, what I would do, is find a likely mobo candidate and google for the model and linux as terms, look for success and trouble reports.


El Quintron
Resident Mouth Breather
Premium
join:2008-04-28
Etobicoke, ON
kudos:4
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to Livadia

Long time Linux user here, generally speaking Linux supports most motherboards, but you might be looking a specific features provided by your motherboard that aren't supported in Linux.

I would suggest this:

Find motherboards you're interested in, check whatever special features they may have, and then check if Linux supports them. You may not need these features therefore making Linux support for them moot.

Also worth mentioning if it makes your decision any easier:

Everything you mentioned in your OP is already supported in Linux, but would be hardware dependent.

i7 isn't so much future proof over i5, but would definitely have better performance with Virtual machines, and a few other application types.

This should get you some background information:

»www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Inte···n/1.html
--
Support Bacteria -- It's the Only Culture Some People Have



Gordo74
Premium
join:2003-10-28
Monroeville, PA
reply to Livadia

The only thing I would do is possibly bump the i7 down to i5, but this should last you 5-10 years with what you are doing easily.

You will want an SSD for your boot drive. Once you use it, you will understand why. It is the single fastest day-to-day upgrade you can do that affects a normal user most.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($289.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B75 PRO3-M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($76.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix sport 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($92.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Red 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($111.99 @ Adorama)
Wireless Network Adapter: TP-Link TL-WDN4800 802.11a/b/g/n PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter ($32.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: NZXT Source 210 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($24.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair CX 430W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $774.89
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-14 08:53 EDT-0400)



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1
reply to Livadia

Its seems you're introducing two opposing views.

Asking for user experience with respect to Linux on a specific motherboard is a good way to assure better Linux support, however, the response was a link to an older Z68 motherboard that is discontinued. This would seem to be in conflict with your desire to have it last longer since IMO the suggestion bbear2 made was fairly accurate. Buying the latest technology is likely the best way to extend the viability of said hardware.

The Z68 chipset was released in mid 2011 (I think, as were most motherboards that use it) and we are now almost midway through 2013.

Intel Haswell will supposedly be released in early June. I hear June 4th or around there.



berserken

join:2011-03-27
Oakland, CA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

You seem to have entirely missed the levity of my reference to my success with Linux on the Z68. As I said more pertinently, motherboards are, essentially, supported OOTB with the current Linux kernels with no need to install anything in the way of drivers. To catch a rare exception, google for Linux and any mobo prospect as the terms.



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

With all due respect I was only pointing out the paradox in the interests / questions of the OP.



berserken

join:2011-03-27
Oakland, CA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

I'll try again.

The Z68 was entirely my semi-facetious injection, not at all specified by OP. I did provide a broader perspective, based on my 13+ years using Linux on a wide variety of motherboards, that drivers don't seem to be that much of an issue but corner cases could be ferreted out at google.

The last is what I would consider relevant to the OP's needs, whose question is not paradoxical and had nothing to do with Z68, which was my not-100%-on-topic example, as I said ("a little out of your spec"), complete with whimsical gif, intended to convey my partially tongue-in-cheek reply, wrt to the Z68, anyway.

To review, the kernel developers keep pretty well on top of hardware but a prudent move would be to screen mobo prospects at google before investing cash.



Octavean
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-31
New York, NY
kudos:1

I'll try again too

If I am in the market for a new system based on as of yet unreleased hardware (which I am) like an Asus Z87 Deluxe with unknown features and supporting chips how well can I or anyone else say it will fair in any OS with respect to the full complement of features,.....?

Intel X79 PCIe 3.0 support I'm looking at you!

Lets say it has a new never before seen Thunderbolt controller chip (Im not saying it does thats just an example)? Or perhaps a new never before released Broadcom 802.11ac chip (Broadcom might be a bit sketchy in general)?

I get that today a google search and a patch will probably get current Intel Thunderbolt hardware working in Linux (if it doesnt work right out of the box) but was that true the day such hardware was first released into the retail market? And even now does it work well? Last I checked even in Windows Thunderbolt wasn't quite right (devices not seen unless added at boot). All those questions above were rhetorical BTW.

The bleeding edge is called that for a reason but newly released hardware will likely have longevity with respect to already released hardware thats been around long enough to prove itself.

So if the OP wants to maximize longevity of the system but wants proven hardware (asking for user testimonials about existing boards) it is paradoxical in that sense. A subtle and simple concept,...

THe OP didn't specify unreleased hardware like Haswell but it is reasonable to expect Z87 will be more current / relevant then P67, Z68 and Z77 as time goes by.



berserken

join:2011-03-27
Oakland, CA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

Well, "maximize longevity" is a subjective and dubious goal that was not voiced by the OP.
"Not that I need that i7 performance per se, but an i7 may mean I could hold on to it a bit longer." That was.

General, suitable recommendations have already been made. A Z68 could probably be found that fills the bill, or something newer yet not "bleeding edge" (another term injected by you to support the "paradox" claim), something already proven and easy to find. I stand by my recommendation and second the other sensible advices.


Livadia

join:2007-12-18
Canada

Well, this is what I decided to get (I am going to buy them soon)

Asus P8Z77-V LK MB
cpu i7-3770 (about $70 more than the i5, I would consider buying)

I hope I will not have major problems running linux on it.

Thank you all for your input



berserken

join:2011-03-27
Oakland, CA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

Following my own advice, I found at least one positive report: »answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+so···n/218138

I should say Octavean's point about newest hardware vs. Linux support becoming paradoxical at the extremes is valid. However, it sounds like relatively recent, powerful hardware can be had that works for your needs. Good luck!