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FifthE1ement
Tech Nut

join:2005-03-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL

1 edit

[Equip] 8 Downstream 8 Upstream Modems?

I found this post (see below for link) asking if any 8x8 cable modems had come out, however the post was over a year old and perhaps I thought some had possible been released in the past year. I tried Google but it turned up nothing. I want to purchase a modem rather than pay the $7 per month to rent, considering in one year the modem will be paid for not to mention I'll be getting a better modem (8x4 at a minimum). I have a Cisco DPC3000 and it sucks. It's 4x4 and there is no way to view the diagnostic info as it's locked and no one (even at Comcast) knows the info for the password and username. If anyone has any info on a 8x8 modem I can pick up let me know as I want to buy by tomorrow or the next day. Thanks in advance.

»8 downstream 8 upstream modem?

5th
--
"The relationship between what we see and what we know is never settled..."


Chris 313
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Re: 8 Downstream 8 Upstream Modems?

said by FifthE1ement:

I found this post (see below for link) asking if any 8x8 cable modems had come out, however the post was over a year old and perhaps I thought some had possible been released in the past year. I tried Google but it turned up nothing. I want to purchase a modem rather than pay the $7 per month to rent, considering in one year the modem will be paid for not to mention I'll be getting a better modem (8x4 at a minimum). I have a Cisco DPC3000 and it sucks. It's 4x4 and there is no way to view the diagnostic info as it's locked and no one (even at Comcast) knows the info for the password and username. If anyone has any info on a 8x8 modem I can pick up let me know as I want to buy by tomorrow or the next day. Thanks in advance.

»8 downstream 8 upstream modem?

5th

There are no 8x8 modems that I know of. Though I think I read somewhere that Broadcom put out a 8x8 chip. Something like that. The closest you'd get to an 8x8 modem would be to buy one of the announced 24x8 (I think) media gateways. But those haven't even been put out for testing that I know of, let along letting a customer buy one.

So, in the short term for like the next 1-2 years, your best bet would be just to go for an 8x4 modem like the Moto 6141 or the Zoom 5341J model. There will probably be 16/4 modems out later this year, but if you don't wanna wait, 8x4 is the best you can get right now.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

2 edits

2 recommendations

reply to FifthE1ement
There have been some Nx8 DOCSIS 3.0 chipsets released and gateways that use them, as discussed in this thread: »Dream Modem - 24x8

However, the problem is being able to cram more than 4 channels into the noisy 5 to 42 MHz band that is currently allocated for the return channel in the U.S., see: »Re: [Speed] Download/upload ratio: Is it physics?

There are some ways under the current DOCSIS 3.0 specs to increase upstream speeds:

Will Anyone Switch On Cable's Upstream Booster?
By Jeff Baumgartner, Light Reading Cable - July 6, 2012
»www.lightreading.com/docsis/will···40138386

But, other than moving to a "mid-split" arrangement that extends the upstream path up to 85MHz, it doesn't seem likely that you'll see more than 4 channel bonding on the upstream with DOCSIS 3.0.

The best bet for higher upstream speeds will arrive with DOCSIS 3.1 modems.

EDIT: The links to Leslie Ellis's articles on her Translation-Please website in that »Re: [Speed] Download/upload ratio: Is it physics? thread do not work right now as she is currently renovating the site.

Here are the articles on the MCN webite:

Why Is the Upstream Path So Ugly?
By Leslie Ellis, Multichannel News - April 2, 2001
»www.multichannel.com/news-articl···y/101948

How Cable Gets More Stuff Upstream
By Leslie Ellis, Multichannel News - November 8, 2008
»www.multichannel.com/news-articl···m/102014


Ripper
Premium
join:2002-02-07
West Palm Beach, FL

1 recommendation

reply to FifthE1ement
Click for full size
I have Blast 50/10 and speed test shown is with 8 down and 1 up. We actually had 2 up for a while and they dropped area back to 1 up with no change in speeds. With many areas not even getting the full 4 up now, I think 8 up is way overkill for the upload speeds they have at this time.


anon623

@comcast.net
reply to FifthE1ement
I would guess that a mid split might be a plausible option for Comcast. In some east markets they are preparing to go encrypted on all of the channels even for the limited basic customers. This would mean a box or cablecard would be required to pick up any channel. The hidden advantage in that is Comcast can move around channel frequencies without disrupting service. So it's very possible once they make the switch they could free up all of the lower frequency area to be used for return.


mackey
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1 recommendation

reply to FifthE1ement
Don't hold your breath. I think DOCSIS 3.1 will be rolling out before 8x8/Nx8 becomes widely available/implemented.

I'd say buy the SB6141 now, and in 2-4 years get whatever D3.1 modem is available then.

/M


EG
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1 recommendation

reply to Ripper
said by Ripper:

I think 8 up is way overkill for the upload speeds they have at this time.

Bear in mind that "speeds" aren't the only concern, bandwidth capacity also is. Suppose one has four or five users on their home network wanting to upload stuff simultaneously. Let alone all of the neighbors that share the same return path / cable segment.


THZNDUP
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reply to anon623
Except for the initial changeout of the diplex filters, equalizers, both forward and reverse amps, as well as the resweep of both paths, should be a piece of cake. Not to mention the redesign and getting the electronics vendors up to speed for the parts pipeline.
--
one should not increase, beyond what is necessary, the number of entities required to explain anything


FifthE1ement
Tech Nut

join:2005-03-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
reply to telcodad
Thanks for all the reply's, I went with the Motorola SurfBoard SB6141 and I got it for $66.49 with free two day shipping. I'll save the $7 per month in the first year and then some!

said by anon623 :

I would guess that a mid split might be a plausible option for Comcast. In some east markets they are preparing to go encrypted on all of the channels even for the limited basic customers. This would mean a box or cablecard would be required to pick up any channel. The hidden advantage in that is Comcast can move around channel frequencies without disrupting service. So it's very possible once they make the switch they could free up all of the lower frequency area to be used for return.

They already did that here in South Florida.

said by Ripper:

I have Blast 50/10 and speed test shown is with 8 down and 1 up. We actually had 2 up for a while and they dropped area back to 1 up with no change in speeds. With many areas not even getting the full 4 up now, I think 8 up is way overkill for the upload speeds they have at this time.

That's crazy as I get 55/11 on my blast tier connection.

5th
--
"The relationship between what we see and what we know is never settled..."


Chris 313
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said by FifthE1ement:

Thanks for all the reply's, I went with the Motorola SurfBoard SB6141 and I got it for $66.49 with free two day shipping. I'll save the $7 per month in the first year and then some!

said by anon623 :

I would guess that a mid split might be a plausible option for Comcast. In some east markets they are preparing to go encrypted on all of the channels even for the limited basic customers. This would mean a box or cablecard would be required to pick up any channel. The hidden advantage in that is Comcast can move around channel frequencies without disrupting service. So it's very possible once they make the switch they could free up all of the lower frequency area to be used for return.

They already did that here in South Florida.

said by Ripper:

I have Blast 50/10 and speed test shown is with 8 down and 1 up. We actually had 2 up for a while and they dropped area back to 1 up with no change in speeds. With many areas not even getting the full 4 up now, I think 8 up is way overkill for the upload speeds they have at this time.

That's crazy as I get 55/11 on my blast tier connection.

5th

I've gotten as high as 66/11 on a 4/1 system with a 4x4 modem. (Though 8x4 or better is always the obvious choice if you can get it.) So with the 6141, you should be good to go for whatever Comcast can throw at you.

That 205/xx speed that Comcast is getting ready to pull out the bag will be rolled out on 8x4 or better modems: »Re: [Praise] Free 3-month Extreme 105 Upgrade

So basically, all you gotta do equipment wise is sit back and enjoy.

Enjoy! And be sure to return and post your 6141 experience, signals and speed tests. ^_^


telcodad
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Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to FifthE1ement
said by FifthE1ement:

said by anon623 :

I would guess that a mid split might be a plausible option for Comcast. In some east markets they are preparing to go encrypted on all of the channels even for the limited basic customers. This would mean a box or cablecard would be required to pick up any channel. The hidden advantage in that is Comcast can move around channel frequencies without disrupting service. So it's very possible once they make the switch they could free up all of the lower frequency area to be used for return.

They already did that here in South Florida.

Wow, if you're talking about a mid-split, I didn't think there were many systems with that yet.

Do you know how many upstream channels are on your system right now?
Does your system top off at 1GHz?


Ripper
Premium
join:2002-02-07
West Palm Beach, FL
reply to FifthE1ement
I have the Motorola SB6141 modem, and this modem has the Puma 5 chipset, which used to be Texas Instruments, but was bought by Intel. Intel link to Puma 5 »www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/···ief.html


FifthE1ement
Tech Nut

join:2005-03-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
reply to telcodad
said by telcodad:

said by FifthE1ement:

said by anon623 :

I would guess that a mid split might be a plausible option for Comcast. In some east markets they are preparing to go encrypted on all of the channels even for the limited basic customers. This would mean a box or cablecard would be required to pick up any channel. The hidden advantage in that is Comcast can move around channel frequencies without disrupting service. So it's very possible once they make the switch they could free up all of the lower frequency area to be used for return.

They already did that here in South Florida.

Wow, if you're talking about a mid-split, I didn't think there were many systems with that yet.

Do you know how many upstream channels are on your system right now?
Does your system top off at 1GHz?

In South Florida even the limited basic is encrypted and the only way to see channels is with a box or DTA. However we still don't have the channels in the 1000's What is above 1Ghz? My system is 1Ghz but are there higher?

Comcast is using 8x2 in my area for internet and my modem is a new Motorola SurfBoard SB6141.

Modem Stats:

Channel ID 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Frequency 375000000 Hz 333000000 Hz 339000000 Hz 345000000 Hz 351000000 Hz 357000000 Hz 363000000 Hz 369000000 Hz
Signal to Noise Ratio 38 dB 38 dB 38 dB 38 dB 38 dB 38 dB 38 dB 38 dB
Downstream Modulation QAM256 QAM256 QAM256 QAM256 QAM256 QAM256 QAM256 QAM256
Power Level
The Downstream Power Level reading is a snapshot taken at the time this page was requested. Please Reload/Refresh this Page for a new reading
3 dBmV 3 dBmV 3 dBmV 3 dBmV 3 dBmV 3 dBmV 3 dBmV 3 dBmV

Upstream Bonding Channel Value
Channel ID 6 5
Frequency 34800000 Hz 27900000 Hz
Ranging Service ID 2924 2924
Symbol Rate 5.120 Msym/sec 5.120 Msym/sec
Power Level 47 dBmV 47 dBmV
Upstream Modulation [3] QPSK
[3] 64QAM
[3] QPSK
[3] 64QAM

Ranging Status Success Success

Signal Stats (Codewords) Bonding Channel Value
Channel ID 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Total Unerrored Codewords 12840653429 4250726506 4250734724 4250743941 4250711919 4250711300 4250713470 4250713205
Total Correctable Codewords 448 533 397 276 234 291 318 584
Total Uncorrectable Codewords 2665 3501 3609 2685 2951 3013 2674 3744

On speed tests I get 55/11.

5th
--
"The relationship between what we see and what we know is never settled..."


telcodad
Premium
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Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
said by FifthE1ement:

said by telcodad:

said by FifthE1ement:

said by anon623 :

I would guess that a mid split might be a plausible option for Comcast. In some east markets they are preparing to go encrypted on all of the channels even for the limited basic customers. This would mean a box or cablecard would be required to pick up any channel. The hidden advantage in that is Comcast can move around channel frequencies without disrupting service. So it's very possible once they make the switch they could free up all of the lower frequency area to be used for return.

They already did that here in South Florida.

Wow, if you're talking about a mid-split, I didn't think there were many systems with that yet.

Do you know how many upstream channels are on your system right now?
Does your system top off at 1GHz?

In South Florida even the limited basic is encrypted and the only way to see channels is with a box or DTA. However we still don't have the channels in the 1000's What is above 1Ghz? My system is 1Ghz but are there higher?
:
5th

OK, so you weren't talking about a mid-split but Limited Basic encryption then.

The area above 1GHz is usually used for MoCA: »Re: Moca questions

Also see: »/speak/slidesh···U1MC0%3D


Orlando 57

@comcast.net
There is not enough room in the return for 8 upstream channels. As someone posted already the standard return is 5 to 42 MHz. You can't really use the top 2 MHz because of roll off issues.

So now you have really have under 35 MHz of usable bandwidth. With 6 MHz wide carriers the most you can get is 5 upstream channels.

As far as getting rid of lower downstream channels that would take a complete rebuild of all the amplifiers. all the internal electronics like diplex filters, EQ's, forward and return amps would need to be changed.

It can be done but it will take time and money.


telcodad
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Lincroft, NJ
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said by Orlando 57 :

There is not enough room in the return for 8 upstream channels. As someone posted already the standard return is 5 to 42 MHz.

Yes, that was my post, a few back: »Re: 8 Downstream 8 Upstream Modems?


FifthE1ement
Tech Nut

join:2005-03-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL

1 recommendation

reply to telcodad
said by telcodad:

OK, so you weren't talking about a mid-split but Limited Basic encryption then.

The area above 1GHz is usually used for MoCA: »Re: Moca questions

Also see: »/speak/slidesh···U1MC0%3D

I quoted his post but I meant simply was replying to his limited basic encryption like you mentioned.

We do have MoCA in use in my area for Comcast's AnyRoom DVR service so I guess we have 1Ghz+? Isn't it just amazing how much they can put through one copper coaxial cable?! I wonder if there are frequencies we don't know about yet and perhaps one day we'll be able to utilize them.

The Motorola SurfBoard SB6141 is working great although Comcast had some issues adding it to my account as they are idiots, lol. One lady insisted that she didn't need the serial number to add the modem to my account, only the MAC! After an hour and no modem I called back and talked to someone who knew what they were doing and took all the info and the modem was running before I hung up. However now they have three modems logged onto my account (the messed up add, the original I had, and my correct one, lol). The Motorola SurfBoard SB6141 saves me $355 over 5 years (5 average lifespan of modem tech, $7 per month Comcast fee for rental X 12 X 5 = $420 - the price I paid for modem $65 = $355 Comcast 5 year savings!). Well worth it as my old modem was a 4x4 and this is a 8x4 although Comcast only utilizes 8x2 in my area.

5th
--
"The relationship between what we see and what we know is never settled..."


telcodad
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reply to telcodad
FYI - An article on the MCN site yesterday:

Cable Show 2013: CTOs Say DOCSIS 3.1 Will Save Cable’s Upstream
OFDM Will Make Spectrum 50% More Efficient

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - June 10, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/technology/···m/143819
quote:
OFDM, a technology that’s already popular in the wireless world and tagged for the new DOCSIS 3.1 specs, will give cable access to a modulation scheme that’s expected to make existing spectrum about 50% more efficient. That could help cable operators avoid an operationally tricky “mid-split” that would widen the current upstream spectrum range from today’s 5 Megahertz to 42 MHz.


IowaCowboy
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Springfield, MA
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reply to FifthE1ement
I just bought a Motorola SB 6141 (Best Buy price matched Amazon.com so I got it from BB for $81.99 instead of $99.99) and its a pretty decent modem. Mine came in a white case.

My 6120 bit the dust.


RR Conductor
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reply to FifthE1ement
Comcast is using 8x2 here in Mendocino County, CA too. I am running a Zoom 5341J, and am on the Blast! (50/10) tier.


San Jose is 170 miles south of me, not 50

Downstream Bonded Channels
Channel Lock Status Modulation Channel ID Frequency Power SNR Correctables Uncorrectables
1 Locked QAM256 8 597000000 Hz 2.7 dBmV 42.2 dBmV 39006 3847
2 Locked QAM256 1 549000000 Hz 2.4 dBmV 41.9 dBmV 8774 7060
3 Locked QAM256 2 555000000 Hz 3.3 dBmV 42.0 dBmV 16324 16240
4 Locked QAM256 3 567000000 Hz 3.3 dBmV 42.5 dBmV 25360 2497
5 Locked QAM256 4 573000000 Hz 3.0 dBmV 42.5 dBmV 9244 344
6 Locked QAM256 5 579000000 Hz 3.1 dBmV 42.5 dBmV 4269 140
7 Locked QAM256 6 585000000 Hz 3.2 dBmV 42.5 dBmV 2870 224
8 Locked QAM256 7 591000000 Hz 2.8 dBmV 42.1 dBmV 1241 148

Total Correctables Total Uncorrectables
107088 30500

Upstream Bonded Channels
Channel Lock Status US Channel Type Channel ID Symbol Rate Frequency Power
1 Locked ATDMA 2 5120 Ksym/sec 30600000 Hz 38.3 dBmV
2 Locked TDMA and ATDMA 1 2560 Ksym/sec 25300000 Hz 37.5 dBmV
3 Not Locked Unknown 0 0 Ksym/sec 0 Hz 0.0 dBmV
4 Not Locked Unknown 0 0 Ksym/sec 0 Hz 0.0 dBmV


telcodad
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reply to telcodad

Increased Upstream Speeds Ahead

A DSL Reports news item today about increasing upstream speeds using DOCSIS 3.1 technology:

Cable Eyes DOCSIS 3.1 For Faster Upstream Speeds
Comcast Calls Technology a 'Godsend in the Upstream'

By Karl Bode, DSL Reports - June 27, 2013
»Cable Eyes DOCSIS 3.1 For Faster Upstream Speeds
quote:
Comcast has been testing faster upstream speeds for some time, stating as early as 2010 that they were seeing [upstream] speeds of 75-100 Mbps in the lab.

DOCSIS 3.1 is still some time away: CableLabs is expected to complete the specs this year, though Werner doesn't see trials starting until 2014, with commercial products arriving in late 2014 or early 2015.



telcodad
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Lincroft, NJ
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1 edit

New Line Equipment for Supporting DOCSIS 3.1

Latest news on equipment for supporting DOCSIS 3.1:

Anadigics Gets Amped For DOCSIS 3.1
New Mount Line Amplifier Supports Spectrum up to 1.2 GHz

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - July 23, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/distributio···1/144530
quote:
The vendor’s first D3.1-focused component out of the chute is the ACA2429 GaN power doubler, a 1.2 GHz surface mount line amplifier. While most upgraded cable plant is built out to 750MHz, 860MHz, or 1GHz, the DOCSIS 3.1 specs will entertain the notion of expanding the downstream by additional 200GHz, so that’s where Anadigics’ new amps will try to fit in.

That expanded spectrum range could provide the necessary head room to support a “high-split” that would involve raising the current upstream bandwidth ceiling from 42 MHz to 200MHz.


andyross
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-04
Schaumburg, IL
200 GHz?? I wonder if that's a typo and they really mean 2GHz or 200MHz?


telcodad
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1 edit
"While most upgraded cable plant is built out to 750MHz, 860MHz, or 1GHz, the DOCSIS 3.1 specs will entertain the notion of expanding the downstream by additional 200GHz, so that’s where Anadigics’ new amps will try to fit in."
said by andyross:

200 GHz?? I wonder if that's a typo and they really mean 2GHz or 200MHz?

Yes, an obvious typo (which I did not notice myself) which should be 200MHz

EDIT: The author has now corrected that typo.


telcodad
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1 edit
reply to telcodad

DOCSIS 3.1 specs to be issued soon

Cablelabs announced at the SCTE Cable-Tec Expo today that the DOCSIS 3.1 specifications will be publicly issued by the end of this month:

CableLabs to Issue DOCSIS 3.1 Specs This Month
Specs For Modems and CMTSs For Platform That Targets Downstreams of 10 Gbps, Upstreams of 1 Gig Upstream To Be Issued in October

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - October 21, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/distributio···h/146185

EDIT: Also, a follow-up article to that now:

First Wave of DOCSIS 3.1 Gear Expected By Late 2014
That Should Set The Table for Initial Deployments in 2015

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - October 21, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/distributio···4/146196


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reply to FifthE1ement

Re: 8 Downstream 8 Upstream Modems?

said by FifthE1ement:

We do have MoCA in use in my area for Comcast's AnyRoom DVR service so I guess we have 1Ghz+?

The MOCA signal is only inside your home, it is only used to transmit between the Anyroom DVR and the other boxes in the house.

Comcast installs a Low-pass filter on the coax where it enters your house, that cuts off anything over 1GHz getting in or out.

MOCA is not used to transfer any signals throughout the rest of Comcast's outdoor cable plant.

Isn't it just amazing how much they can put through one copper coaxial cable?! I wonder if there are frequencies we don't know about yet and perhaps one day we'll be able to utilize them.

Coaxial cable gets really bad beyond the 2-3GHz(microwave frequencies) point, it's way too lossy, and is only good for very short distances.
It can still work at higher frequencies, but is best left to short jumpers of 10 feet or less, often only several feet or less.

An example might be a cell tower, with frequencies in the 1.8GHz to 2.6GHz range, and a short 120ft run of hardline type coax can be 1.25 inches to over 2 inches in diameter, just to keep the signal loss down to an acceptable level.

Beyond that, a Waveguide replaces coax for long signal runs.
It's like a hollow metal tube, it's circular or rectangular in shape, and the radio waves just bounce along inside it, to their destination.

Microwaves behave much more like Light than lower frequency RF signals do, which is why a waveguide is the foundation behind fiber optic cable(fiber was originally called a LightGuide), where light bounces along inside the fiber to it's destination.

I could see pushing a typical cable TV plant up to 1.3GHz, or even to 1.5GHz, but the fiber nodes will need to be completely rebuilt to handle it, and will need to be moved much closer to your home, almost like Fiber-To-The-Curb.

At that point you move the downstream channels to the 1GHz-1.3GHz range, and expand the upstream channels to 5-133MHz.

Leaving a bit of guard band in there above the upstream path, that would support a 50x20 DOCSIS 3.0 modem by todays standards, but with that extra bandwidth, future versions of DOCSIS would likely opt for larger than 6MHz channels, so fewer "bonded channels" but they would also be much larger physical channels.
Like bonding 10 channels but the channels would be 30MHz each, instead of 6MHz.

1+Gbps speeds would almost be the "Starter" Internet tier at that point.
--
ROCK 'TIL SUNSET


telcodad
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Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

3 edits
reply to telcodad

Re: DOCSIS 3.1 specs to be issued soon

An article on the MCN site today and what can be expected with the first DOCSIS 3.1 modems:

First DOCSIS 3.1 Modems Will Have 4-5 Gbps Potential
Fully-Loaded Hybrid 3.0/3.1 Gear Will Pack Some Punch

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - October 24, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/distributio···l/146255
quote:
The first DOCSIS 3.1 modems will be hybrids that support both DOCSIS 3.1 and DOCSIS 3.0 spectrum, and will be able to handle both simultaneously. The DOCSIS 3.0 side will carry a minimum requirement of bonding 24 downstream QAM channels and 8 upstream QAM channels, alongside a DOCSIS 3.1 minimum that calls for the ability to tie in two channels/blocks orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) at 192MHz-wide each, and two 96MHz-wide channels for the upstream.

Operators will later decide how and when to turn up that capacity, but when fully-loaded, that 3.0/3.1 mix will be able to handle max downstream speeds of 4 Gbps to 5 Gbps, and 1.5 Gbps in the upstream right out of the chute ...

EDIT: Corrected the "1.5 Mbps" typo in the quote that Chris 313 See Profile had noticed, after it was corrected later on by the article's author.

EDIT2: The author also updated the article's headline (to indicate that those are potential speeds), and which also ended up modifying the URL.

EDIT3: Karl also has a DSLR News item on this now: »First DOCSIS 3.1 Modems to Hit 4-5 Gbps


Chris 313
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said by telcodad:

An article on the MCN site today and what can be expected with the first DOCSIS 3.1 modems:

First DOCSIS 3.1 Modems Will Hit Speeds of 4-5 Gbps
Fully-Loaded Hybrid 3.0/3.1 Gear Will Pack Some Punch

By Jeff Baumgartner, Multichannel News - October 24, 2013
»www.multichannel.com/distributio···s/146255

quote:
The first DOCSIS 3.1 modems will be hybrids that support both DOCSIS 3.1 and DOCSIS 3.0 spectrum, and will be able to handle both simultaneously. The DOCSIS 3.0 side will carry a minimum requirement of bonding 24 downstream QAM channels and 8 upstream QAM channels, alongside a DOCSIS 3.1 minimum that calls for the ability to tie in two channels/blocks orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) at 192MHz-wide each, and two 96MHz-wide channels for the upstream.

Operators will later decide how and when to turn up that capacity, but when fully-loaded, that 3.0/3.1 mix will be able to handle max downstream speeds of 4 Gbps to 5 Gbps, and 1.5 Mbps in the upstream right out of the chute ...

1.5 Mbps in the upstream? That sounds pathetically weak, given you have 4-5 Gbps on the download side. Was that a typo?


telcodad
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Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
said by Chris 313:

1.5 Mbps in the upstream? That sounds pathetically weak, given you have 4-5 Gbps on the download side. Was that a typo?

Yeah, it must be, most likely meant to say "1.5 Gbps" Missed noticing that myself!


Chris 313
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join:2004-07-18
Houma, LA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
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·Comcast
·Comcast Digital ..
said by telcodad:

said by Chris 313:

1.5 Mbps in the upstream? That sounds pathetically weak, given you have 4-5 Gbps on the download side. Was that a typo?

Yeah, it must be, most likely meant to say "1.5 Gbps" Missed noticing that myself!

Yeah. I had a double take at that. Or the fact I don't have enough coke in me yet and need to snag another can.

If they were gonna be so stingy with bandwidth, at least give us 4-5Gbps down and 500 up.