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TBBroadband

join:2012-10-26
Fremont, OH
reply to motorola870

Re: Does TWC use UPS at the node (or street)?

Alpha also makes products for wireless companies as well as fiber optic providers.

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9
reply to asterger
They're supposed to as they carry residential (E911) phone service over that network. (regulations will vary) I've found that not all parts have backup power, and some of the parts that do, don't have functional batteries.

(In fact, the node I'm on will completely hair the f*** out if the power so much as flickers. All services will be down until a tech physically resets it.)


swintec
Premium,VIP
join:2003-12-19
Alfred, ME
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VoicePulse
·Sprint Mobile Br..
·RapidVPS
they dont claim to be carrier grade phone service so they dont have to adhere to uptime requirements like a telco would. in the same boat as the likes of vonage...best effort service only.
--
Usenet Block Accounts | Unlimited Accounts

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9
As I said, regulations vary. In NC, since they are marketed as a consumer "home phone" service, E911 rules require them to have some form of backup in their infrastructure -- the CPE is not their problem. Also, it's provided as a traditional analog service, delivered as POTS. It may, in fact, be VoIP behind the TA, but you have nothing to do with that. That said, they're rarely fined because few ever complain about it.

Given how much the greedy little [censored] charge for phone service ($39.99!), they could afford to by every customer a new battery every month and still be profitable.

[Vonage operates in a very grey area. It's VoIP, and you can get at the packets. However, they're encrypted and they don't let you use your own device(s). But, they also aren't providing the internet circuit either. TWC phone comes over TWC's network.]

SpookyTunes

join:2002-07-29
Woodside, NY
reply to asterger
Here in Queens NY, we have a box with a green light on our telephone poles that is a UPS. We once had a 10 day blackout, so I can confirm that it works for about 2 to 3 days (internet at least), then it died. FWIW, the Verizon copper service (phone) worked all 10 days.

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
reply to motorola870
said by motorola870:

said by asterger:

Would it then be assuming too much to conclude this is TWC's "standard operating procedure"?

yes having power supplies is a standard operating procedure except in Oceanic TWC territory for some unknown reason as they have very few power supplies and since they rarely lose power they don't put them in so if the power goes out the entire system goes out that is not close enough to a power supply.

The reason for no battery backup even for TWC phone in Hawaii is atleast partly because of the corrosion factor on an island and the immense cost to install any sort of backup. I have not asked recently (so possibly this has changed) but when Oceanic applied to the PUC to start up their phone system, they stated that there were NO plans to EVER put in any type of battery backup for the phones much less for the internet. Because of this, they were not able to apply for carrier status for their phone system. In fact, they admitted in writing that it is intended ONLY as a second line. I would never get their phone system since 911 is unreachable if you have their phone and the power goes out.

I'm not sure where you got the idea that we rarely have power outages in Hawaii. We just had one a couple of weeks ago that lasted 4.5 hours because kids were drag racing (common here) and hit a pole (killing one instantly and the other very serious injury). They knocked a HELCO pole down and we were lucky that HELCO was able to fix it as quickly as they did. Granted, we don't have as many outages as we used to have but we have at least 4-5 a year that usually last 4 hours or more. So, Oceanic's phone system is worthless IMO without backup and the lack of such is what HawaiianTelCom capitalizes on in their ads - their slogan is "Always On". Oceanic shoots themselves in the foot by not having backup for their phone system. I would consider getting their phone if it was always on, otherwise, i will stay with Hawaiian TelCom.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


hawk82

join:2001-04-26
centralmaine
reply to Cablety
Anyone know why AC power was chosen for running the plant, instead of DC power?

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9
Because power companies don't string DC all over the country. Inside the "green box", the equipment very likely is 48VDC.


DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:16
reply to hawk82
said by hawk82:

Anyone know why AC power was chosen for running the plant, instead of DC power?

It's a tradeoff between voltage and amperage.

Much of the current generation of CATV line equipment runs at 24VDC, but the CATV power distribution is done with 60 or 90VAC (actually 87VAC). Each piece of line equipment has a power supply which converts the AC to DC and steps down the voltage.

If higher distribution voltage is used, lower amperage is passing on the distribution system and smaller cables can be used for the same voltage drop over distance.

To directly run the higher amperage needed at 24VDC for the dozens of powered pieces of line equipment, you'd need thicker cables or smaller distribution sections powered by more power supplies. If the system were run at an actual 90VAC or more, the techs would need to be certified electricians.
--
Two is one, one is none. If it's important, have a back up... 99.999% availability just isn't enough sometimes.


hawk82

join:2001-04-26
centralmaine
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
said by DrDrew:

said by hawk82:

Anyone know why AC power was chosen for running the plant, instead of DC power?

It's a tradeoff between voltage and amperage.

Much of the current generation of CATV line equipment runs at 24VDC, but the CATV power distribution is done with 60 or 90VAC (actually 87VAC). Each piece of line equipment has a power supply which converts the AC to DC and steps down the voltage.

If higher distribution voltage is used, lower amperage is passing on the distribution system and smaller cables can be used for the same voltage drop over distance.

To directly run the higher amperage needed at 24VDC for the dozens of powered pieces of line equipment, you'd need thicker cables or smaller distribution sections powered by more power supplies. If the system were run at an actual 90VAC or more, the techs would need to be certified electricians.

Smaller cables. Thanks, that makes sense.

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9
reply to DrDrew
said by DrDrew:

If the system were run at an actual 90VAC or more, the techs would need to be certified electricians.

Like all telco techs are? There's line-powered gear in the telco world fed with 300+V. (There's 182VDC on the line side of my T1. You'll know if you touch it! That's what powers the "smartjack" (HDSL to T1 card))


westsam

@rr.com
reply to asterger
Just had a power outage in the Columbus Ohio metropolitan area. It lasted two hours, was up the whole time. There's no real way to know until it happens.


motorola870

join:2008-12-07
Arlington, TX
kudos:4
reply to Mele20
said by Mele20:

said by motorola870:

said by asterger:

Would it then be assuming too much to conclude this is TWC's "standard operating procedure"?

yes having power supplies is a standard operating procedure except in Oceanic TWC territory for some unknown reason as they have very few power supplies and since they rarely lose power they don't put them in so if the power goes out the entire system goes out that is not close enough to a power supply.

The reason for no battery backup even for TWC phone in Hawaii is atleast partly because of the corrosion factor on an island and the immense cost to install any sort of backup. I have not asked recently (so possibly this has changed) but when Oceanic applied to the PUC to start up their phone system, they stated that there were NO plans to EVER put in any type of battery backup for the phones much less for the internet. Because of this, they were not able to apply for carrier status for their phone system. In fact, they admitted in writing that it is intended ONLY as a second line. I would never get their phone system since 911 is unreachable if you have their phone and the power goes out.

I'm not sure where you got the idea that we rarely have power outages in Hawaii. We just had one a couple of weeks ago that lasted 4.5 hours because kids were drag racing (common here) and hit a pole (killing one instantly and the other very serious injury). They knocked a HELCO pole down and we were lucky that HELCO was able to fix it as quickly as they did. Granted, we don't have as many outages as we used to have but we have at least 4-5 a year that usually last 4 hours or more. So, Oceanic's phone system is worthless IMO without backup and the lack of such is what HawaiianTelCom capitalizes on in their ads - their slogan is "Always On". Oceanic shoots themselves in the foot by not having backup for their phone system. I would consider getting their phone if it was always on, otherwise, i will stay with Hawaiian TelCom.

I was going by the fact that Hawaii is less likely to have power outages than most of the U.S. due to weather which is the main reason why the power supplies are installed on the mainland U.S.


news

@videotron.ca
reply to cramer
said by cramer:

said by DrDrew:

If the system were run at an actual 90VAC or more, the techs would need to be certified electricians.

Like all telco techs are? There's line-powered gear in the telco world fed with 300+V. (There's 182VDC on the line side of my T1. You'll know if you touch it! That's what powers the "smartjack" (HDSL to T1 card))

Most electrical jobs in telco central offices or cable headends are done by electricians. Cable maintenance technicians work with 60 or 90VAC on coaxial cable lines but if there's an issue with the wire between the power company and the electrical outlet where the power supply is plugged, an electician will be called.