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TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
·HughesNet Satell..
·WesTex Connect

Uninsulated Power Line Over My Roof, Does That Meet Code?

and no it's not the insulated drop to my house or another, it's bare aluminum 10kv at the top, then a ground/neutral, then a 120V phase then another 120V phase.

I recently moved here and I want attach a 40 foot over the air TV antenna my house eve for support and no matter where on the house I go that damn line is too close for comfort. My pole is telescopic so I could get it up, but if it were to ever fall on the line it would be one big fireworks show. I'm also nervous that if the line were to ever break and fall on my metal roof that the arc would set my house on fire.

I would be very appalled to find out that this is actually allowed under the electric code, IMO only a insane person would run a uninsulated 10kv line over a residential house.

I'm in Texas BTW if the codes differ by state.

I mainly wanted to find out if it's permitted to be this way before I start telling the electric co to move it.
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robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1

1 edit
Did you buy the house? If so, what does the title policy the deed restrictions say regarding any electric easements? Can you post a pic of the line showing where it is in relation to your house?

kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to TheTechGuru
There's a lot of overhead wires that are not insolated. Why insolate it when 1. they're separated from each other by design 2. Would you trust a high tension line even it was insolated 3. you have no business to be around it 4. what happens if your tower fell against the wire and scraped the insolation off if there was some.

You have no business putting anything up that might fall against a wire unless you want to be cooked well done ...


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
·HughesNet Satell..
·WesTex Connect
i only mentioned them being uninsulated to make clear they are not a drop feed.

You're saying I'm supposed to go without any tv because a inconsiderate poco ran lines over my house? I don't think its allowed, i do not see any other houses with lines over them.
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CompTIA Network+ Certified

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
How do you know that the lines were run over your house and not that your house was built under the lines? Can you answer my earlier questions?


StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T Midwest
reply to TheTechGuru
Is your lot small? Suppose you put your pole a the side of the house -- perhaps in line with the peak of the roof.

»www.pseg.com/business/local_gove···tGov.pdf has some info.

Those wires are run uninsulated. Where did you get the 10 KV number? Just wondering. The voltage to the primary of a neighborhood transformer could be above or below that, but it is substantially lower around here.

It looks like you need a 10 ft minimum clearance. You are wanting to presume that your pole might topple over. If that happens, the higher the line is, the more clearance you will have as your pole topples. So the height should figure into your plans.


StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL

1 recommendation

reply to TheTechGuru
said by TheTechGuru:

inconsiderate poco ran lines over my house?

I am skeptical.

kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL
Reviews:
·Charter

1 recommendation

reply to TheTechGuru
It's like my sister-in-law was complaining about a power pole in the front yard. She said it was an eyesore and it should be moved. I asked her if it was there when they bought the house. The answer was a nearly silent "yes". They had every opportunity to not buy the house. The OP should have looked around before he bought/rented the house. It's like these screemy-winnis that cry because trains make noise as they go by their house and they should "reroute the tracks". The track had been there for 100+ years .....


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to TheTechGuru
I wonder, what happens if a kite gets in contact with one of those?

I ask because my son was flying his kite in a huge open park but started running towards a narrower section of the park where a high voltage uninsulated line went across.

Got me thinking as to the dangers on something like this.


cybersaga

join:2011-12-19
Welland, ON

1 recommendation



TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
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·WesTex Connect
reply to alkizmo
said by alkizmo:

I wonder, what happens if a kite gets in contact with one of those?

I ask because my son was flying his kite in a huge open park but started running towards a narrower section of the park where a high voltage uninsulated line went across.

Got me thinking as to the dangers on something like this.

Depends, 120V line, probably nothing unless the string is wet, high voltage kv+ line, possibly a arc flash down the string.

I've seen metal car ports fly up into lines in storm, now that's a bright show (be sure to wear welding goggles if you watch one and put on sun block).

In reply to others, most likely the house was here first, it's a 1940's ish red/orange large cinder-block size brick that has been remodeled and painted.

Being able to put up my antenna is only my second concern, my first is what if the line were to break in a storm? I don't want it arcing on my house. The run is pretty long too, looks 300-400 feet. As a ex cable installer I've seen and been around a lot of lines and I can not recall a instance of seeing HV lines running over a home.
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TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
Reviews:
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·WesTex Connect
reply to cybersaga
said by cybersaga:

(youtube clip)

Yes, as I said, arc flash if HV lines.
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CompTIA Network+ Certified

nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to TheTechGuru
Have to see what the easement is. Also yes high voltage lines do not go over a house in most cases. I did say most as there are one off situations here and there.

Also went out on an electric locate at night for a backed up sewer. Rotorooter was digging happily between two houses and I said stop there is electric there
Oh just the 120 drop is all they said. I said nope 69kv in oil cooled line. Besides maybe not surviving you would be out of business trying to pay the damages.
Now not likely to have done damage as concrete capped.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to TheTechGuru
said by TheTechGuru:

said by cybersaga:

(youtube clip)

Yes, as I said, arc flash if HV lines.

Not THOSE HV lines.

It's the distribution line to feed the transformers. They're something like 12kV


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to TheTechGuru
said by TheTechGuru:

Being able to put up my antenna is only my second concern, my first is what if the line were to break in a storm? I don't want it arcing on my house. The run is pretty long too, looks 300-400 feet.

This is the strongest argument you have when discussing it with the utility. Don't mention the antenna at all.


nunya
LXI 483
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join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:12
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
reply to TheTechGuru
Move your antenna elsewhere.

1) You already know it's not safe to install an antenna mast anywhere near power lines, regardless of the voltage.

2) The power company is probably not going to move the lines. The NESC is a voluntary standard and not retroactive. However, section 234 of the NESC does allow cables to be placed over structures provided certain distance requirements are met.
--
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ilikeme
I live in a van down by the river.
Premium
join:2002-08-27
Sugar Land, TX
kudos:1
reply to TheTechGuru
Could you post pics of the problem? Also, what power company is it?


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
TEXAS
kudos:2
It's dark out right now, it's a local coop.
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CompTIA Network+ Certified

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to TheTechGuru
Can' you just clip your TV directly to the overhead wires and get a 40Km long antenna?
Caveat: Don't try this at home


ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA
said by MaynardKrebs:

Can' you just clip your TV directly to the overhead wires and get a 40Km long antenna?
Caveat: Don't try this at home

Can I try it at work?

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4

1 edit
said by ropeguru:

said by MaynardKrebs:

Can' you just clip your TV directly to the overhead wires and get a 40Km long antenna?
Caveat: Don't try this at home

Can I try it at work?

Ask your PHB and if he says ok .......


TheTechGuru

join:2004-03-25
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reply to TheTechGuru
Actually that's not a bad idea if one can connect to the neutral without touching the others. Wait I can do that right inside my house via the ground or neutral prong of a outlet. RadioShack used to sell a plug in device with a F connector that did just that back in the 90's, worked great in the city.
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DrDrew
That others may surf
Premium
join:2009-01-28
SoCal
kudos:17

1 recommendation

said by TheTechGuru:

Actually that's not a bad idea if one can connect to the neutral without touching the others. Wait I can do that right inside my house via the ground or neutral prong of a outlet. RadioShack used to sell a plug in device with a F connector that did just that back in the 90's, worked great in the city.

Being that the ground or neutral connects to the ground, it probably won't make a good antenna.... You need a wire not connected to the ground to be an antenna.
--
Two is one, one is none. If it's important, have a back up... 99.999% availability just isn't enough sometimes.


StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T Midwest
said by DrDrew:

Being that the ground or neutral connects to the ground, it probably won't make a good antenna.... You need a wire not connected to the ground to be an antenna.

Not really. Many antennas are grounded.

This is not an endorsement of using a HV power line as an antenna.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
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Reviews:
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reply to TheTechGuru
I'm guessing you bought/rented the house sight unseen.

I would evaluate a property and its surroundings and not rush into closing/signing the lease. If I were in your shoes, I would have moved on with my home search with those lines going over my house. If those lines come down, you are talking a fire in the best case scenario and I would be more concerned about being electrocuted.

If the house is an inheritance, that is a different story.

You could also contact your state DPU for more information. Around here, I don't see any lines going over buildings so I'm guessing the code in Mass does not allow power lines to go over roofs.
--
I've experienced ImOn (when they were McLeod USA), Mediacom, Comcast, and Time Warner and I currently have DirecTV. They are much better than broadcast TV.

I have not and will not cut the cord.
Expand your moderator at work

kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to IowaCowboy

Re: Uninsulated Power Line Over My Roof, Does That Meet Code?

I really can't see a utility running wires, especially high voltage wires, outside the scope of their easements. They are bond by different codes other than the NEC, otherwise they'd never get away with running undersized and aluminum wires from the pole to the house. He can check with the city, but I doubt he'll come up with something. He should have looked around the property before buying/renting.


linicx
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2002-12-03
United State
reply to TheTechGuru
I would be particularly concerned if the wire is aluminum. As far as I know its use was banned in the 1970s - especially for mobile homes. .
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alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1

1 recommendation

said by linicx:

I would be particularly concerned if the wire is aluminum. As far as I know its use was banned in the 1970s - especially for mobile homes. .

for power infrastructure, aluminum is super useful.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to TheTechGuru
Service drops are usually aluminum conductors with a ACSR messenger.

Uninsulated distribution conductors are ACSR.