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cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27

Plumbing advice wanted - whole house water filter

Ok, I decided to DIY a whole house water filter. I bought a transparent GE unit , that takes a cartridge to get rid of chlorine smell/taste from the public supply (not well). It is all I need (I've looked into more expensive setups, but for my house, this is perfect. And price was $65.
Now for the "actual" work part.
The filter is a 1" thread. What do I need in parts to fit 3/4" copper?
I planned on installing this with the Sharkbites product, but after much web research, and talking with a few plumbers (unbiased ones), I decided to go with copper/soldering than push on.
I estimate 4 elbows (I'll get a few extra), two ball valves, and 5' 3/4 L. Two brass straps and 6g ground wire (filter breaks the ground). I may get a post or two to support fittings to backing plywood board. I've teflon tape for the filter threads, solder and "MAPP" gas for soldering.

I need to know, what "should" I use for connecting the filter housing to the copper? (1" threaded openings on the filter).
I am guessing, a pair of 1" to 3/4" fittings, with compression? Thanks for any tips, pointers!
--
Splat



shdesigns
Powered By Infinite Improbabilty Drive
Premium
join:2000-12-01
Stone Mountain, GA
Reviews:
·Atlantic Nexus

1" threaded will be a 3/4" pipe thread.

I put mine inline. Cut out a section of line, put a 3/4" NPT fitting on one side and a 3/4 NPT fitting and a union connection on the other.

I had to screw on the filter onto the fixed pipe. The cartridge part had to be removed for clearance to spin the filter on. Then screw the fitting union on. Last, the union connection is made and the cartridge and cover are installed.

I also added a shutoff valve on each side to make it easier to change the filter.
--
Scott Henion

Embedded Systems Consultant,
SHDesigns home - DIY Welder



54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to cableties

said by cableties:

I decided to go with copper/soldering than push on.

Then never forget the number one rule for soldering plumbing, if it is to be soldered it must be clean and fluxed. If it is not perfectly clean it will not solder well if at all. Second rule, with propane and more so with MAPP, "heat gently" and as much as possible "evenly" then while keeping your solder out of the flame as much as possible, rub the edge of the joint with the tip of the solder and wait for it to flow, continue to wet the joint with the solder until the entire joint has filled with it, pull the heat and quickly examine your work, if the entire joint is filled you are done, if not gently re-heat and add more solder, if you added too much and have a drip at the bottom wipe it off with a DRY cotton rag.

I estimate 4 elbows (I'll get a few extra), two ball valves, and 5' 3/4 L.

Add to your list 2 3/4 inch unions, you will need to buildup the connectors for the filter before screwing them into the filter, you cannot place the male adapter into the filter and solder it or good-bye filter, the unions will also allow for an easy removal of the filter housing should it need to be replaced.

I need to know, what "should" I use for connecting the filter housing to the copper? (1" threaded openings on the filter).

Since you are working with copper you should be able to find 1 inch male adapters with 3/4 sweat, if not just buy two 1” to 3/4” copper bushings and reduce the joint that way.

I am guessing, a pair of 1" to 3/4" fittings, with compression? Thanks for any tips, pointers!

Don’t mix compression with soldering, if you are going to go through the trouble to solder it do the whole job that way.

Two brass straps and 6g ground wire (filter breaks the ground). I may get a post or two to support fittings to backing plywood board. I've teflon tape for the filter threads, solder and "MAPP" gas for soldering.

Add to that list, flux, some strips of emery paper, maybe a hand held wire brush for the interior of the fittings, some cotton wipes to wipe the soldered fittings and to wipe off solder should you need to remove and re-solder a joint and if you are going to be soldering against anything flammable a insulating blanket and a bucket of water with a cotton rag in it.

Note do not use anything other than pure cotton with solder.

P.S. The water bucket with the rag in it is for safety, well the bucket is, the purpose of the rag is something you will understand, once you have determined that cold copper looks just like hot copper and holding that wet rag in your hand afterwards feels pretty good…

Been there done that.


54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to shdesigns

said by shdesigns:

1" threaded will be a 3/4" pipe thread.

I don't understand, a water filter with a 1" NPT thread in the body will require a 1" NPT male adapter to take it to copper.


StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T Midwest

4 edits
reply to cableties

Click for full size
Apollo valve, 3/4 copper, 1 inch NPT filter
»www.homedepot.com/p/Watts-1-in-x···02254987 or »www.homedepot.com/p/Mueller-Stre···00209513 can be part of your solution. Maybe somebody will suggest something which does more of the job. I used a schedule 80 PVC bushing. I used blue teflon tape plus good pipe dope. The machined brass fitting is the more official way. The filter housing is polypropylene big blue filter that takes 20 inch by 4 inch filter elements. I could have gotten the 3 big blue filter housings with the 3/4 inch threads. Oddly, at the time the 1-inch thread housings were a lot cheaper (a mispricing?). I had thought that with the Apollo valve I would be able to have 3/4 sweat on one side, and a 1 inch MNPT on the other. Nope. It has to be all 1/2 or all 3/4 or all inch. Dang.

Think about changing filter elements. Note that a valve or two can be handy for when you change the filter.

»www.apollovalves.com/pipemaster
•Gives you a valve
•Gives you a union.
Cannot give you 3/4 on one side and 1 inch on the other, unfortunately. So you would have 3/4 on both sides of this valve, and a bushing at the filter.
»www.menards.com/main/search.html···pemaster


shdesigns
Powered By Infinite Improbabilty Drive
Premium
join:2000-12-01
Stone Mountain, GA
reply to 54067323

Are you sure it is 1" NPT? Most filters are 3/4" NPT (thread size is about 1").



54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to StillLearn

said by StillLearn:

»www.homedepot.com/p/Watts-1-in-x···02254987 can be part of your solution. Maybe somebody will suggest something which does more of the job.

This would get he OP down to a 3/4 inch male adapter but adds another set of threads to wrench up.


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to 54067323

Thanks! Yeah, bucket, water, I have denim scraps (all cotton), flux, emery tape (sanding for pipes), cutter with flare and trimmer, solder (60/40 i think) but roll of it for plumbing.

I will go with advice on the unions. The flared coupling/fitting was on the PDF from GE on the filter installation.

Yeah, heat gently is wise, even with the hotter MAPP gas. I did a few tests on 1/2" and heat the fixture (elbow in this case). After good cleaning and flux, fitting, then heat, the solder magically pulled from the back to front. And yes, cotton along dry cotton is important. Pipes get hot. I also have a compressor to blow any water out from the cut pipes (after draining out lowest tap).

Good advice!
--
Splat



54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to shdesigns

said by shdesigns:

Are you sure it is 1" NPT? Most filters are 3/4" NPT (thread size is about 1").

Yea if the hole looks like it is 1" then thats 3/4 NPT, the filters I installed here where all 3/4 NPT, but I don't know what the OP has, if it is truly 3/4 NPT one thing he does have is less work to do.


54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to cableties

What size copper plumbing are you working with?



PSWired

join:2006-03-26
Annapolis, MD
reply to shdesigns

I'd also consider the shutoff valves and a bypass valve. If the filter bowl cracks on a weekend, you can just bypass it instead of replumbing the entire thing while you find a replacement bowl.



John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:6

1 recommendation

reply to cableties

Prep tool:

»www.homedepot.com/p/t/202078158?···02078158



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting

1 recommendation

reply to cableties

I assume the chlorine filter is probably activated carbon may want to think about prefilter to remove sediment to reduce loading on the carbon filter and possibly a post filter to remove carbon fines.

»www.waterfilters.net/ has a bunch of training videos that you may find useful.

I installed a whole house sediment filter and wrote up my system on my site may provide some ideas.
»www.tschmidt.com/writings/SolarW···ater.pdf

Things to think about:
1) Add inlet and outlet shutoffs to make changing the filter easy.
2) Add bypass valve in case there is ever a problem with the filter housing.
3) Think about adding a container under the filter housing to catch water when you need to change the filter cartridge.
4) Cold water results in condensation - take that into account.
5) Use food grade silicon grease to lubricate the O ring and filter sump.

/tom


Body Count

join:2010-09-11
Columbus, OH
reply to cableties

For whole house filters, nothing beats aquasana's version. I have one right now and it's awesome. Without it my water taste is very bad. I used to buy distilled drinking water from the store because I like my water with zero taste. This filter brings my city water to almost zero taste like it should be but keeps the flouride and much needed minerals in there.

It is costly but it's worth the cost. I did some research and it has the lowest cost per day upkeep of most whole house systems. It's around $1100 for the 10 year version and $800 for the 3 year version. The main tank lasts 10 or 3 years based on which one you get. The prefilter lasts 3 months but you can get a pack of four for $15 direct from them.

They also have options if you want soft water and if you use well water. They have a special salt free filter that turns water soft that lasts 6 months. And for well water they have a post filter unit that gets rid of microbes or anything bad in the system.

You need a professional plumber to install it or the warranty is void.

Sorry if this is a long post. I just love my aquasana filter so much that I love to tell people about it. It was my best investment I did after buying the house. Well worth the money.

Back on topic.. for connectors I use pressure screws instead of solder. It works just the same and you don't have to deal with heating anything up and making it look nice. I installed two cutoff valves using pressure screws to both of my outside faucets so when I'm away on vacation, I can turn the water off from the inside and not have to worry on leaks or if my neighbor is stealing my water for her lawn.



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

2 recommendations

Someone is talking about installing a $65 filter themselves and your suggestion is an $1100 filter that must be installed by a plumber? I'm sure you're happy with your filter, but I don't think it's even in the realm of what cableties See Profile is thinking about.



54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to John Galt

For a weekend warrior that is a damm good tool to have, personally I prefer to use emery cloth on a pipe, I can clean it fast and with minimal effort, however in doing so the end of that pipe being scrubbed is only a fraction of an inch from my palm and depending on how the pipe was cut and reamed, that end could be like a razor blade and yes it can take a good slice before you even feel it.

So for the safety factor alone that tool pays for itself.


54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to tschmidt

said by tschmidt:

I assume the chlorine filter is probably activated carbon may want to think about prefilter to remove sediment to reduce loading on the carbon filter and possibly a post filter to remove carbon fines.

/tom

That is an excellent suggestion, here I installed a single housing on the main where it enters the house which has a string filter inside of it, this filters out the crud the city doesn’t charge me for delivering, mostly rust and chips of black stuff. Where the drinking water breaks out I installed two more housings in series, the first one is a carbon based pre-filter I believe 2 microns and the second is I think is a .5 micron.


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to 54067323

3/4" OD pipe. I'll have spare Type L on hand too.

The GE PDF says fittings to connect to 1" Female NPTF
--
Splat



cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to 54067323

I have this tool (a bit worn from my Dad) and emery. Emery is great in a tight spot. A friend has a smaller tube one, in a clear housing too. But good suggestion!
--
Splat



cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27
reply to Ken

@ Ken -- yeah, I am in a Townhome. If I had a house, I would likely have wellwater. Then I would go with sediment/metals/active charcoal and a softener (for shower lines and washer).

But this filter (combination charcoal/sediment filter is additional $31 from HD) so I am spending ~$100 for filtration, along with another $60 in sweat and pipe parts (valves are the most).

Local plumber quoted me $750. I was like, um, well, NO. I support plumbers but that was like, no.
--
Splat



54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL

said by cableties:

along with another $60 in sweat and pipe parts (valves are the most).

Have you considered since you will have a #6 bypass anyhow maybe reprice this using schedule 40 PVC?


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to PSWired

said by PSWired:

I'd also consider the shutoff valves and a bypass valve. If the filter bowl cracks on a weekend, you can just bypass it instead of replumbing the entire thing while you find a replacement bowl.

+1 You definitely want to do this! Another advantage of doing this is that you can check whether the filter is becoming plugged or not by bypassing it for a test.

Body Count

join:2010-09-11
Columbus, OH
reply to Ken

said by Ken:

Someone is talking about installing a $65 filter themselves and your suggestion is an $1100 filter that must be installed by a plumber? I'm sure you're happy with your filter, but I don't think it's even in the realm of what cableties See Profile is thinking about.

Sorry. A $65 filter might be alright for the OP and I respect that. For me it's not. I replace my pre-filter every 3 months which is basically his entire house filter. I see what's trapped in there when I take it out. I'm glad my water goes through another two filters before it comes to me.


54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to cableties

said by cableties:

The GE PDF says fittings to connect to 1" Female NPTF

Then adapt.


54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to Body Count

said by Body Count:

I replace my pre-filter every 3 months which is basically his entire house filter. I see what's trapped in there when I take it out. I'm glad my water goes through another two filters before it comes to me.

What are you going to do when in a few years you have to drop half a grand to replace that unit in the middle?

Body Count

join:2010-09-11
Columbus, OH

said by 54067323:

What are you going to do when in a few years you have to drop half a grand to replace that unit in the middle?

Umm save up money until then? $10 a paycheck and it's taken care of.


cableties
Premium
join:2005-01-27

I was looking at $1800 filter system, one that doesn't need a filter (just back flush). However, to each their own needs, mine was stay cheap, just filter the smell/taste of chlorination.
There are acid neutralizers, iron reduction, UV, 3 stage, reverse osmosis, active charcoal, Culligan-type services, softeners, and industrial-commercial solutions (think espresso machines, ice machines,...).

Personally, I would get your water tested. Find out what is in it. Some folks, a Brita pitcher is all ya need for drinking water. For others, up to $5000 in systems...

Thanks for all the tips! I will work on it either this weekend or next, and promise to take some pix when done (or if I fup up)
--
Splat


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus
reply to Body Count

I'm building a house that will be on a well and I'm sure I'm going to need a whole-house softener and filter system. Aquasana looks interesting, with its no-salt system.

Looking at online reviews I see only one possible red flag, regarding the physical integrity of the hardware. People seem to talk about failing components after a filter change, or leaks.

Now, it may be that these are more related to the smaller, faucet or sink sized units, but how have the mechanicals for the whole house unit you have been holding up? Any concerns? This isn't a budget system and I'd expect a well made system for the price they're asking.



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1

1 recommendation

Have you had the water tested to determine just what you need or are you just shooting in the dark guessing what type system you need?

You may find you need much less to provide good water.


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus

said by Jack_in_VA:

Have you had the water tested to determine just what you need or are you just shooting in the dark guessing what type system you need?

You may find you need much less to provide good water.

Oh, definitely! I'm just trying to figure out what options I may consider later this year when the time comes. I'm hoping for the best, but it's likely there will be pretty high minerals plus iron and sulfur in the water that will cause a bad taste.