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tml73

join:2013-06-30
Fraser, MI

cat5 cable ?

Before my neighbor moved out, he was cleaning out his garage and gave me 2 -1000' spools of regular cat5 (not cat5e) cable. I have the performance level of Comcast hsi which I believe is 22 or 25 Mbps. I'm thinking I might want to run some extra lines throughout my house so would the cat5 support this speed and would it be ok to use or should I go out and buy cat5e?


graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2
cat5 will be fine.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to tml73
According to the Wikipedia entry on Cat 5 cable »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable it should be fine:
quote:
Category 5 vs. 5e
The category 5e specification improves upon the category 5 specification by tightening some crosstalk specifications and introducing new crosstalk specifications that were not present in the original category 5 specification. The bandwidth of category 5 and 5e is the same - 100 MHz.


YukonHawk

join:2001-01-07
Patterson, NY
reply to tml73
You'll be fine with the Cat5. You wouldn't see any performance upgrade by using Cat5e and you'll save some bucks too.


Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10
reply to tml73
Even though the cat5 is adequate & you have the spools for free, I wouldn't run it & have limitations if you decide in the future to upgrade your network to Gigabit, etc. I ran cat6 throughout my house & have fantastic transfer rates within my network. I wouldn't go less than cat5e.

indigoblu3

join:2004-03-14
Arlington Heights, IL

1 recommendation

reply to tml73
cat 5 will have a hard time doing gigabit at distances or will incur transmission errors. You will have no problems with 100Mbit ethernet. With Comcast offering 100Mpbs+ service plus the desire for more mainstream home networking ( using gigabit switches in your home to connect devices ) this may be sub-optimal for you in the near future.

For temporary runs this will be fine: but if you are going to do the work you may want to invest in something that is not obsolete the day you install it.


ClockerXP

join:2001-05-24
Sterling Heights, MI
kudos:1
Reviews:
·WOW Internet and..
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to tml73
I agree. 1000' of CAT6 cable is only $100. $80 for CAT5e Why install something obsolete when the latest and greatest is so cheap?

»www.monoprice.com/products/subde···id=10234


JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA
Latest and greatest? Hehe, I use cat7 cables just because I can. They are way thicker than cat6 cables.

plat2on1

join:2002-08-21
Hopewell Junction, NY
reply to tml73
cat5 should be fine for gigabit ethernet especially at the typical distances for home wiring.

tml73

join:2013-06-30
Fraser, MI
reply to tml73
Wow! Now I'm really confused....it's about equal consensus. I'm grateful for the free cat5 but I don't want to screw myself down the road. Not the same topic, but I was discussing adding some 1080p ip surviellance cameras to my house and the cameras are power over ethernet and I was also told regular cat5 will be fine for running that to the cameras. My first reaction was how cool it will be to have all this free cable that I can run all my new ip cameras off it plus run a few lines in my house in case I need or want an Internet connection in the future but now I'm torn on what I should do. Thanks for all the replies.


JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA
Cat5 I've used it's fine. As long as it's not too long then it won't interfere with gigabit speeds.

Max I'd go with it is 20ft.


ctgreybeard
Old dogs can learn new tricks
Premium
join:2001-11-13
Bethel, CT
reply to tml73
One thing to look out for, no matter what level of Cat 5. DON'T kink it or allow sharp bends. I believe that coils are bad too.
--
Old dogs can learn new tricks!


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
said by ctgreybeard:

One thing to look out for, no matter what level of Cat 5. DON'T kink it or allow sharp bends. I believe that coils are bad too.

And the mistake most make is the ends, you must not untwist any more than necessary to fit and crimp the connectors.
a bad crimp can lower CAT6 to Cat3 more easily than you think.
It is recommend for in wall installs to use a punch down type cover plate/connector and a machine made patch cord for the last 6 feet for any Mission critical runs.
since you have a couple free rolls if the walls are open/an easy pull, laying 2 cables for each run even if you only terminate one.
A simple QC check light can save a lot of frustration later.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to telcodad
said by telcodad:

According to the Wikipedia entry on Cat 5 cable »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable it should be fine:

quote:
Category 5 vs. 5e
The category 5e specification improves upon the category 5 specification by tightening some crosstalk specifications and introducing new crosstalk specifications that were not present in the original category 5 specification. The bandwidth of category 5 and 5e is the same - 100 MHz.

Cat5 is good to 100mbit
Cat5e is good to gig
--
»www.change.org/petitions/create-···imcity-4


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to tshirt
said by tshirt:

said by ctgreybeard:

One thing to look out for, no matter what level of Cat 5. DON'T kink it or allow sharp bends. I believe that coils are bad too.

And the mistake most make is the ends, you must not untwist any more than necessary to fit and crimp the connectors.
a bad crimp can lower CAT6 to Cat3 more easily than you think.
It is recommend for in wall installs to use a punch down type cover plate/connector and a machine made patch cord for the last 6 feet for any Mission critical runs.
since you have a couple free rolls if the walls are open/an easy pull, laying 2 cables for each run even if you only terminate one.
A simple QC check light can save a lot of frustration later.

If you can find someone with a fluke QC tester then you can verify your runs are up to spec

back when I took cisco 1 one of the tests was to make a patch cable, sure it was easy to get the continuity good but the near end cross talk (NEXT) and plain cross talk (XT) within spec was the hard part (just a little to much untwisted and that 5e would be out of spec, and the teacher used a fluke QC tester to test if it was right, and if it failed you kept at it till it passed. (and to make a patch calve, a cross over and a rollover)

until you've tested your cables with a QC tester you don't know how hard it can be.
--
»www.change.org/petitions/create-···imcity-4

tml73

join:2013-06-30
Fraser, MI
reply to tml73
Thanks everyone. Is my logic correct in saying if my Internet speed is 22 or 25 Mbps and cat5 is rated at 100 Mbps then the cat5 should be ok and I should not see any performance issues as far as speed? The cable I was given is solid core and ill only use it for in wall punched down into jacks and then use cat5e for patch cables.


bradyr
Columbia College IT
Premium
join:2008-10-27
Sonora, CA
reply to tml73
cat-5 is fine for gigabit, including gigabit with PoE. to be super safe and so you're following the standards, try to stay under 100 meters per segment (end to end).

but trust me, standard cat-5 is no problem on gigabit unless you have crappy cables or terminations. where i work, damn near every building is still wired with cat-5 and when we pushed gigabit to the desktop, and VoIP (poe), we never had an issue with the wiring.

this includes the building wiring (cat-5), the patch to switch, and then the patch to endpoint.

shit, when we switched over to voip, we even had to use some cat-3 cabling and it also worked fine for gigabit and poe (not that i recommend doing that.) we're talking ghetto patch cables from switchport to a 110 block in some cases.

The only time i had to force my switch gear to a lower speed (10Mbit) due to cabling was when we had like a 500-700 foot cat-5e run out to a contractors trailer.


bradyr
Columbia College IT
Premium
join:2008-10-27
Sonora, CA
reply to tml73
again, standard cat5 is rated for gigabit. do your terminations right and you will have zero issues with it, unless you're over like 300 feet end to end.

Master5c8

join:2002-09-15
Urbana, IL
reply to tml73
Cat5 is generally considered to be limited at 100Mbps
Cat 5e is usually recommended for 1000Mbps

With a proper installation you shouldn't have any problems getting your 25Mbps of internet through the cable. There's a lot of Cat5 networks running around and for most business and residential applications 100Mbps provides perfectly adequate performance. Unless you have or expect to have an application that would require more than 100Mbps bandwidth it's unlikely you'd be able to notice a difference between a 100Mbps and a 1000Mbps home network hooked up to less than 100Mbps internet service.

I'm not saying there isn't value in planning for the future or building in upgradability, but I don't think you have anything to worry about if you want to install the cable you have.


bradyr
Columbia College IT
Premium
join:2008-10-27
Sonora, CA
where are you guys getting that cat5 is only rated for 100Mbps??

standard category 5 cable is rated for 1000Mbps.

saratoga66

join:2002-08-22
Saratoga, CA
reply to JigglyWiggly
said by JigglyWiggly:

Latest and greatest? Hehe, I use cat7 cables just because I can. They are way thicker than cat6 cables.

Well considering that not one major manufacture of cable makes CAT7 cable I would not be bragging about it. Just because some Chinese factory decided to make a fatter cable and mark it CAT7 doesn't mean crap. I would install the OP's CAT5 cable long before I would install some no name cable marked CAT7.


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
reply to bradyr
said by bradyr:

where are you guys getting that cat5 is only rated for 100Mbps??

standard category 5 cable is rated for 1000Mbps.

From: »www.networkcablingdirectory.com/···1151.htm
quote:
Network support - CAT 5 cable will support 10BASE-T and 100BASE-T network standards, that is it supports networks running at 10 Mbps or 100 Mbps. CAT 5e is an enhanced version of Cat5 that adds specifications for crosstalk (see below). Cat5e cable is completely backwards compatible with Cat5, and can be used in any application in which you would normally use Cat5 cable. However, the added specifications of Cat5e enable it to support Gigabit Ethernet (1000BASE-T), or networks running at 1000 Mbps.
:
Cat5e vs Cat6
There is a great deal of debate among people about whether new cabling installations should use Cat5e or Cat6. Many people incorrectly assume that by running Cat6 they will then have a Gigabit Ethernet. However, in order to achieve true Gigabit Ethernet speeds, every single component on a network must be gigabit rated, such as the switches, hubs and network interface cards. This isn't to say that there aren't differences between Cat5e and Cat6, however. The general difference between category 5e and category 6 is in the transmission performance. While Cat5e can support gigabit speeds, Cat6 is certified to handle gigabit Ethernet. Additionally, the Cat6 specification is better suited toward environments that are generally unfriendly to twisted pair cabling. This includes areas that have lots of interference from things like power lines, lights, and manufacturing equipment. Still, for most applications, Cat5e is perfectly suitable and preferable to Cat6: it is more economical and performs almost as well. However, if you can be certain that all the components on your network are gigabit rated, and the volume of the data being transmitted calls for certified gigabit performance, then Cat6 is the way to go.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to bradyr
said by bradyr:

where are you guys getting that cat5 is only rated for 100Mbps??

standard category 5 cable is rated for 1000Mbps.

From the EIA/TIA standard
cat5 might do gig but its not rated for it, you just got lucky
--
»www.change.org/petitions/create-···imcity-4


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15
said by DarkLogix:

said by bradyr:

where are you guys getting that cat5 is only rated for 100Mbps??

standard category 5 cable is rated for 1000Mbps.

From the EIA/TIA standard
cat5 might do gig but its not rated for it, you just got lucky

Yes, Cat 5e, as it says in my previous post: " While Cat5e can support gigabit speeds, Cat6 is certified to handle gigabit Ethernet."


Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10
reply to bradyr
said by bradyr:

where are you guys getting that cat5 is only rated for 100Mbps??

standard category 5 cable is rated for 1000Mbps.

Because if you Google cat5 it will only tout 100Mbps. That being said, agreed that shorter lengths of cat5 can negotiate 1000Mbps. I'm sure someone can post a chart that gives loss factors for catxx & length.
--
In God we trust; all others bring data!



bradyr
Columbia College IT
Premium
join:2008-10-27
Sonora, CA

1 recommendation

reply to telcodad
guys, look, the spec for gigabit ethernet, ieee 802.3ab, was written to include category 5 UTP cable:

"IEEE 802.3ab, ratified in 1999, defines gigabit Ethernet transmission over unshielded twisted pair (UTP) category 5, 5e, or 6 cabling and became known as 1000BASE-T. With the ratification of 802.3ab, gigabit Ethernet became a desktop technology as organizations could use their existing copper cabling infrastructure."

source: »en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigabit_Ethernet

category 5e cable is the same bandwidth as category 5 cable.

if we were comparing cat 3 to cat 5, then i can understand.

but again, category 5 is rated for gigabit by definition. end of story, period....

debating the differences between cat5e and 6 and 6A are different subjects, but please do not state that standard cat5 is not for gigabit when it clearly is...


bradyr
Columbia College IT
Premium
join:2008-10-27
Sonora, CA
another source regarding gigabit on cat 5:

»www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk389/t···#wp17263

i hate to call bullshit on things, guys, please, but i'm telling ya'll that the standard cat 5 cable is designed to support gigabit by definition and IEEE spec.

tml73

join:2013-06-30
Fraser, MI
Thanks bradyr! After reading that link, I think I'll go ahead and install everything I intended to with that free cat5 and rest easily knowing I'll be fine


YukonHawk

join:2001-01-07
Patterson, NY
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to ClockerXP
said by ClockerXP:

I agree. 1000' of CAT6 cable is only $100. $80 for CAT5e Why install something obsolete when the latest and greatest is so cheap?

»www.monoprice.com/products/subde···id=10234

I stand corrected...I thought CAT5e and CAT6 were way more money that. Definitely better to go with the better stuff.

tml73

join:2013-06-30
Fraser, MI
reply to tml73
By the way...what's a qc check light/ qc tester?