Tell me more x
, there is a new speed test available. Give it a try, leave feedback!
dslreports logo
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer

Search Topic:
uniqs
246
share rss forum feed


Bender2000
Bite My Shiny Metal Ass
Premium
join:2002-05-06
Dollard-Des-Ormeaux, QC

problem with UPS

I had issues with my UPS awhile back...battery wouldn't hold a charge. Figured it was about time the batts needed replacement, but instead of buying from APC or a major box store, I went to the local electronics and gadget store (called Access Electronique in Dollard-des-ormeaux). Their stuff is a touch cheaper than most places and haven't had any real issues. Well, I bought the batteries for my UPS, looked up the right specs and swapped them out. Everything worked fine for about a month, now the battery isn't holding a charge again. At least that's what the UPS seems to think. The other day, the power was on, and the UPS started beeping and everything plugged into it shut down. UPS said the batt was dead (yet it was on AC power). Is there some sort of other electronics in these things that can just die and that's it, toss in the garbage? Anything I could possibly troubleshoot? The useless softare that comes with it says everything is A-OK (self test), but it's not.


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
Make/Model of the UPS? I'm assuming it's an APC?

That said - there is a real quality difference in batteries - the cheap ones are usually cheap for a reason... It wouldn't be impossible for the battery to have failed very quickly; particularlly if there was a manufacturing defect.


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to Bender2000
Is your UPS under warranty still? If so, you just voided it by using a third party battery. They probably don't have any way to know that, though, so if the UPS is still under warranty, buy a genuine APC battery and see how that works. If that battery also fails to hold a charge, you can contact APC about replacing your UPS. If that battery works, you'll have answered your question.
--
Latest version of CapSavvy systray usage checker: »CapSavvy v4.2 released!


HiVolt
Premium
join:2000-12-28
Toronto, ON
kudos:23
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to Bender2000
If your UPS needs two batteries, and if you bought them at a crappy shop then one battery could be much weaker than the other. Could just be from sitting on the shelf for a while.

Your UPS might also need calibrating, ie it has a chip inside which calculates how many minutes it can support on a given load percentage.

What you do is unplug it from all devices, and let it charge for 24 hours. then plug in a single 100W standard light bulb (no eco spiral CCFL bulbs or LED bulbs), pull the power from the wall and let it run until it dies. Also keep time of how much it runs for. When it drains, let it cool off for a couple hours, then plug it in to charge for 24 hours, then repeat the same discharge process. If you about the same runtime, then its calibrated...

Also depending on the UPS and the battery capacity, if you don't get much runtime, say 5-10 minutes on 100W, then the batteries aren't capable of holding a load on a computer.
--



lugnut

@communications.com
reply to Bender2000
That's the problem with boutique batteries. You have no idea how long they were sitting on the shelf before you bought them. Same deal with cellphone batteries. If someone offers you a deal that's too good to be true it probably is. They mark them down to unload them even though they may have been sitting in storage for two years, slowly dying of old age.

I usually try to buy from places online that specialize in them that have huge turnover.


HiVolt
Premium
join:2000-12-28
Toronto, ON
kudos:23
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
said by lugnut :

That's the problem with boutique batteries. You have no idea how long they were sitting on the shelf before you bought them. Same deal with cellphone batteries. If someone offers you a deal that's too good to be true it probably is. They mark them down to unload them even though they may have been sitting in storage for two years, slowly dying of old age.

I usually try to buy from places online that specialize in them that have huge turnover.

That's exactly why I buy my batteries from upsforless.ca and never had any issues like that, even in multi-battery systems like the rackmount APC units.
--



Bender2000
Bite My Shiny Metal Ass
Premium
join:2002-05-06
Dollard-Des-Ormeaux, QC
reply to Bender2000
ok thanks...ya I had thought about that, but decided to take a chance. Seems it can't handle the load of the PC (only about 400W for everything), but can handle just the router and modem.

It's APC, 1500VA if I can remember correctly. and no, it's not under warranty.

When I get some time, I'll try what Hivolt suggests. Sounds like the batteries may just suck, but worth a shot. If all else fails, I'll grab the two batteries from upsforless.ca

IamGimli

join:2004-02-28
Canada
kudos:2
Before you go on buying any more stuff bring the two batteries back to the place you bought them at and explain your issues. They will likely test them individually and I would expect them to replace the one that's defective (or both if that's the case).

Most local stores have good customer service, you just have to give them a chance.


HiVolt
Premium
join:2000-12-28
Toronto, ON
kudos:23
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to Bender2000
If you have a volt meter, pull out the batteries while they're still connected in the APC 1500, and measure the voltage on each battery when you do a self test. If one is significantly less than another, you know the culprit.
--



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to Bender2000
1500 VA is a start - SmartUPS? BackUPS?

Not trying to ball-bust, they are just very different units...

That said - HiVolt's on a good track with the testing - check for one that's significantly higher or lower then the other... They should be within about a tenth of a volt (0.1 vdc) of each other.


Wolfie00
My dog is an elitist
Premium
join:2005-03-12
kudos:8
reply to HiVolt
The voltage has to be measured as HiVolt See Profile described, i.e.- with the battery under load.

I have a SmartUPS 1500 that began acting so strange that I thought it might have developed a problem other than the battery, but since the dual batteries were well over 5 years old I decided to replace them and hope for the best. The problem was that because of light load, it was always passing self-test, until one of the two batteries got so bad that it couldn't even handle a minor power glitch, and the computer crashed because of it. Only then, IIRC, did the "replace battery" light come on; there had been no warning whatsoever before that. Replaced the batteries via UPS for Less and it's as good as new again.

Moral of the story -- weak batteries can do strange things, especially in large-capacity units with light loads. And also, highly recommend UPS for Less for good prices and excellent batteries.
--
You can easily judge the character of a man by how he treats those who can do nothing for him.
-- Malcom Forbes

The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
-- Mohandas Karamchand "Mahatma" Gandhi