dslreports logo
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
6452
share rss forum feed

iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada

1 edit

Ladder Stand-off Question

Hey Guys,

Have a question.

So I bought this stand-off for my extension ladder yesterday and was pretty happy that now this will prevent any risk of damaging gutters when trying to reach the top of the roof. Plus this will give some stability to the ladder itself as well.

It looked great in theory but when I tried to use them something did not make sense.

How would you know which rung to use to attach the stand-off to before extending the ladder and finding out how much you need to extend to reach the top. If I do that then I have to first extend the ladder all the way and then take it down, attach the stand-off and then extend it again. That like double the work.

If I attach the stand-off to the top rungs before extending the ladder, set the ladder up how it is shown in the picture then how would I be able to reduce the length of the ladder to get the ladder at the correct angle.

Am i missing something?

What is the most productive/proper way of using this?


Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
Where you put it depends on several factors including if you're going to get off the ladder onto the roof or not. If you're going to get off onto the roof you should have at least 4' extending above the roof. Assuming it's an extension letter you can just shorten how much you have extended. If it's not your just have to use trial and error to get the standoff in the correct location.

How far do those extend into the rungs? Hopefully a long way or I would be concerned about them sliding out if the ladder shifted.

iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada
said by Msradell:

Where you put it depends on several factors including if you're going to get off the ladder onto the roof or not. If you're going to get off onto the roof you should have at least 4' extending above the roof. Assuming it's an extension letter you can just shorten how much you have extended. If it's not your just have to use trial and error to get the standoff in the correct location.

How far do those extend into the rungs? Hopefully a long way or I would be concerned about them sliding out if the ladder shifted.

Lets just assume that I will not be getting off the ladder onto the roof. So I will put the stand-off on the first rung.

Anybody there who has actually used one of these?

There is about 7 inches of this thing that actually goes into the rungs.

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
reply to iLearn
I like--where did you buy the stand-off?

I would expect that a 7" extension into the rung oughta be great, then your weight keeps the extension arms in place. Ought not to slide much either, especially by comparison to leaning against the gutter!

Mine's a metal roof with ribs, and the ribs ought to keep the ladder from sliding out of control. I might also cut a couple pieces of pipe insulation to shove over the extensions so it not only pads them but makes them "grippy".

Nice find but now I need to know who makes/sells them...in the U.S. of A.


sempergoofy
Premium
join:2001-07-06
Smyrna, GA
reply to iLearn
Interesting. I have seen (and own) a different stand off designed for when the ladder is against the wall of the house. I've not seen one before designed to stand off from the roof like that. I would have though, probably incorrectly, that the extra distance from the roof I would have to step as I entered the ladder from the roof would make it more likely to have an accident.
--
nohup rm -fr /&

iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada
reply to laserfan
said by laserfan:

I like--where did you buy the stand-off?

I would expect that a 7" extension into the rung oughta be great, then your weight keeps the extension arms in place. Ought not to slide much either, especially by comparison to leaning against the gutter!

Mine's a metal roof with ribs, and the ribs ought to keep the ladder from sliding out of control. I might also cut a couple pieces of pipe insulation to shove over the extensions so it not only pads them but makes them "grippy".

Nice find but now I need to know who makes/sells them...in the U.S. of A.

I bought these here.

»www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/6 ··· ocale=en

In the US, you will get more variety - as always.

»www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_ ··· nd%20off

But again, we are getting side tracked here guys.

What is the right and more productive way of attaching these to the ladder and get the job done.


garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
I'd guess trial and error, as long as you're only using it on your roof you just work with it until you find the "right" place to put them for the various locations and what you're going to do (climb on roof or just reach to it).


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
reply to iLearn
What keeps the stand-offs from sliding "up" and allowing the ladder to still lean against the gutter ?

As for your question as to which rungs to insert into, it seems to me that you'd always use the first two like shown in the picture. If you put it in ones further down, a) you'd have to extend the ladder first to insert them, b) you'd have to extend the ladder that much further above the roof line, and finally, c) you may end up climbing on one piece of the ladder vs having it doubled-up.


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:13
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
reply to iLearn
I've been working on ladders and at heights for decades. That thing looks freaking scary to me. Is that how it's really intended to be used? My mind is racing with different "sliding" scenarios. It doesn't look very sturdy either (maybe because I'm fat ).
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.

iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada
reply to Hall
said by Hall:

What keeps the stand-offs from sliding "up" and allowing the ladder to still lean against the gutter ?

Why and how would it slide up? Under what circumstances?

iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada
reply to garys_2k
said by garys_2k:

I'd guess trial and error,

True

iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

I've been working on ladders and at heights for decades. That thing looks freaking scary to me. Is that how it's really intended to be used? My mind is racing with different "sliding" scenarios. It doesn't look very sturdy either (maybe because I'm fat ).

Can you share why you think this is risky and some of the sliding scenarios?

I definitely dont want to use it if it is not a good product. But in any case, its not that some handy man created this. It is on the market so it must have passed some testing.

Anyways, any feedback on sliding scenarios is appreciated. Safety first.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
reply to iLearn
It probably helps if the roof they sit on slopes up but imagine if the roof they're sitting on was flat or close to flat. As you climb the ladder and approach the top, your weight is going to push the ladder towards the house. Metal bars on shingles aren't going to provide much "grab". Those bars should be rubber-coated or wrapped in something that creates some friction, IMO.


hitachi369
Embrace Your Rights
Premium
join:2001-10-03
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:4
Just to blather on, but the standoff's pictured above should only increase the stability of the ladder provided they are rigid enough not to flex under the weight of the user.

In essence all they are doing in shifting where the weight is placed from the edge to the top, the wider base will make the ladder feel firmer and less wobbly. The surface area will largely be the same maybe even increased potentially adding even more stability.
--
STOP THE NSA WIRETAPS


They who would give up an essential liberty for temporary security, deserve neither liberty or security
~Benjamin Franklin


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
Yeah, I was wondering about the stiffness or rigidity of them as well. Worst case, imagine they splayed outward. Now, it's not like the ladder will fall but it will end up against the gutter and the person on the ladder will probably s**t themselves !

The ones linked at Amazon show different designs - a couple are single tubes/pipes extending more perpendicular to the ladder (then bent downward slightly) plus they have rubber feet to help grab.


DataDoc
My avatar looks like me, if I was 2D.
Premium
join:2000-05-14
Martinsburg, WV
reply to iLearn
If you're worried about them slipping out, maybe wrap a bungee cord around the extensions (under the ladder) to keep them in place.
--
Obama is our Morsi.


John Galt
Forward, March
Premium
join:2004-09-30
Happy Camp
kudos:8
reply to Hall
said by Hall:

Those bars should be rubber-coated or wrapped in something that creates some friction, IMO.

Needs some 70 Shore A durometer injection molded rubber around the curve to stop the sliding.

kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to iLearn
If your getting onto the roof, it needs to extend at least 3' beyond. Set the bracket accordingly. If the ladder doesn't reach in this configuration, then it is too short. Get a bigger ladder .... Also the ladder needs to be tilted correctly. For a rule of thumb, when the ladder is set in-place, stand with your feet at the base of the ladder. Standing straight reach your arm horizontally towards the ladder. Your finger should be touching the ladder. I forget the exact ratio of pitch.


Pacrat
Old and Cranky
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-10
Cortland, OH
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to iLearn
From OSHA page on ladder safety:



SparkChaser
Premium
join:2000-06-06
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

I've been working on ladders and at heights for decades. That thing looks freaking scary to me. Is that how it's really intended to be used? My mind is racing with different "sliding" scenarios. It doesn't look very sturdy either (maybe because I'm fat ).

What he said, except for the fat part


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:13
reply to iLearn
Any time I have to get on a roof, my "rule of thumb" is 3 rungs above the roof line. I think that roughly equates to 3-4 feet on most ladders.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.

iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada

1 recommendation

reply to iLearn
dudes, I can not thank you enough for the comments but I think the train of though has been derailed.

I am not interested in finding out OSHA rules, correct ladder setup routine and whether or not Tom Selleck ever shaved his chest hair.

My question was "What is the most productive/proper way of using this?" The best answer I got so far was by garys_2k "trial and error".

But I did however asked if anyone has any reasons to believe that this is not a safe tool so I can choose not to use it.

I guess I will try it out a few times and report back my experience here.


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:13
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms

How would you know which rung to use to attach the stand-off to before extending the ladder and finding out how much you need to extend to reach the top. If I do that then I have to first extend the ladder all the way and then take it down, attach the stand-off and then extend it again. That like double the work.


You asked. People answered. No reason to get snippy.
I'm not seeing anywhere in this thread that went off topic from your OP.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to iLearn
Perhaps you should direct your questions to the manufacturer.

»www.featherliteladders.com

Part number is 99066. They don't seem to have any information available on it, no specifications, no description, no ratings, no nothing. No way I would use this product.

iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada
reply to nunya
said by nunya:

No reason to get snippy.

Relax brother. I did not know that we do not have a sense of humor today.

iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada
reply to robbin

No way I would use this product.

Why? - please.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
Because they don't give any information on it. What is the ladder rating that it is safe to use with. How much weight does it support. I don't buy cheap, flimsy ladders. I don't want my ladder to fail because I used some cheap product that wasn't designed for it. Why don't they post any specs? NO specs -- that's why I wouldn't use it but perhaps they have specs that they haven't published. That's why I suggest contacting the manufacturer.


tp0d
yabbazooie
Premium
join:2001-02-13
Carnegie, PA
kudos:6
No way I would ever use ladder standoffs, unless possibly at a customers house.. Too unpredictable, too far away from the roof surface

I have a 25ft high roof with box gutters I clean at least once a year. I have a porch roof I use to get up to the 2nd floor roof, which has a regular gutter.. I added 6 extra gutter nails (heavy duty 7" screws with reinforcement) in the location where I put the ladder to reinforce the gutter and prevent bowing or damage.

As for OT replies, its the norm here. Get used to it.

-j
--
if it aint broke, tweak it!!
currently on FiOS (kick aZZ!)

iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada
reply to robbin
said by robbin:

Because they don't give any information on it. What is the ladder rating that it is safe to use with. How much weight does it support. I don't buy cheap, flimsy ladders. I don't want my ladder to fail because I used some cheap product that wasn't designed for it. Why don't they post any specs? NO specs -- that's why I wouldn't use it but perhaps they have specs that they haven't published. That's why I suggest contacting the manufacturer.

Make sense.


Terryala
Premium
join:2003-08-25
Huntsville, AL
reply to iLearn
Hi

Appears they are made by Stanley

»answers.canadiantire.ca/answers/ ··· ions.htm

Grand Dad