dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
2488
share rss forum feed

WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON

[DSL] !!!HELP!!! 6 Public IP Package, 1 Modem, 2 Routers

Ok so heres the deal, I signed with Teksavvy, and this is my first/second week of service, during my sign up I purchased 6 public subnetted IP address as I do some web hosting on the side for extra cash and have a couple of mail servers that require different public IP addresses.

Now this is first time dealing subnetted IP addresses and as well dealing with PPOE Connections, so please try and bare with me.

I have the sagecom and have it in this setup:

Everything related routing disabled (as close i as i can get it to a bridge mode of some sort)

PPOE credentials blanked out on modem (to be done by my router)

with the teksavvy PPOE credentials removed from the modem, the fields for the credentials are auto filled with different credentials, and the modem seems to get some generic IP address which im assuming both of which are assigned automatically from bell

Router #1 Configuration,

WAN port on router connected to LAN Port 1 on Sagecom Modem

WAN Mode set to PPOE

i enter the credentials i recieved from teksavvy (example@teksavvy.com & password)

enter the single static ip i received from them 1.2.3.4

select connect automatically and hit connect, it connects and i have internet access on that network

Router #2 Configuration

WAN port on router connected to LAN Port 2 on Sagecom Modem

WAN mode set to PPOE

provided same credentials as router 1

enter one of the subnetted ip addresses 206.248.143.000 with the subnet mask 255.255.255.248

select connect automatically and hit connect

it says its connected but i have no internet access

am i going about this the wrong way, am i missing something.

Please help, this is slowly eating away at me and teksavvy support sells the IP's but does not support them in any way :-(


henry128

join:2010-09-03
Mississauga, ON

With an IP subnet, I believe you should be doing this entirely with one PPPoE connection. i.e., You make one PPPoE connection, and all 9(?) IP addresses (a /29 subnet and the one /32 static IP) will be routed through that PPPoE connection. There is only one router involved.


WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON

said by henry128:

With an IP subnet, I believe you should be doing this entirely with one PPPoE connection. i.e., You make one PPPoE connection, and all 9(?) IP addresses (a /29 subnet and the one /32 static IP) will be routed through that PPPoE connection. There is only one router involved.

ok, can you describe the layout of the network so i can replicate on my end :-D

WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON
reply to henry128

said by henry128:

There is only one router involved.

I don't think that will work for my multiple servers that require port forwarding :-P

I am going to have to mail servers running to different domains,

ie both server will be using the same ports and thus need different networks


Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to WolfTears

Why not just host multiple domains on a single mail server?


WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON

1 of my customers is using the free version of "Smarter Mail" and it only allows for 1 domain and 10 mailboxes. My other customer is using Zimbra. :-P I have talked to the one using smarter mail, and he is not willing to make the move to zimbra, thus my need for 2 mail servers :-P

Edit: And at some point i am expecting an Exchange server to be joining the party


henry128

join:2010-09-03
Mississauga, ON
reply to WolfTears

hmm...

One router, one PPPoE connection. All of your remaining computers attached to the "LAN" side of the router. The router needs routing tables configured to route rather than NAT.

The router's LAN interface gets assigned one of the addresses from the /29 subnet. Computers on the LAN are also assigned public IP addresses from the /29 block (Don't use the first and last address of the subnet). The default gateway of the LAN machines should be the address of the router, which should then route those out the PPPoE interface. Basically, you're using the public addresses for your LAN (rather than the usual 192.168.0.0/24), then routing instead of NAT+routing between LAN and WAN sides of the network.

As far as I know (and I'm not experienced with home routers), no stock router firmware will give you the ability to route without NAT...


WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON

very true, this being a residential plan from teksavvy, i have to assume that there is some way of doing without a corporate level hardware.


WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON
reply to henry128

I have a TP-LINK TL-WR941ND, under the settings page>Advanced Routing>Static Routing Tables

Would this be what im looking for?



TypeS

join:2012-12-17
London, ON
kudos:1
reply to WolfTears

Cheap PC, enough LAN cards to suit your needs and pfsense would probably be your most cost efficient solution.


henry128

join:2010-09-03
Mississauga, ON
reply to WolfTears

Well, an IP subnet certainly isn't a "residential" feature

You can certainly do this without "corporate level" hardware. I'm sure home routers with custom firmware are capable of doing this. Another alternative is to use a Linux PC as the router.


WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON

Fair enuff,

Now say i have a linux box running as my firewall/router

more specifically the one mentioned pfsense, how exactly would i configure it so that my 2 mail servers has access on two different ip's

Also the router that i have now has static routing capabilities, would that surfice?


henry128

join:2010-09-03
Mississauga, ON

I'm not familiar with the TP-LINK router. Poking around the emulator sounds like it's not what you're looking for. It requires the "gateway" field to be filled in, which doesn't make much sense. It sounds like it's configuring the outgoing routes on the WAN side of things, but doesn't control the NAT/routing in between LAN and WAN, nor does it provide a way to turn off the NAT (»www.tp-link.us/resources/simulat···ndex.htm)


WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON

Also, im not sure if turning of NAT and having public IP's for the lan will affect this or not, but I have a DC running on the primary network right now...........


henry128

join:2010-09-03
Mississauga, ON
reply to WolfTears

I assume your "mail servers" are real computers (or at least VMs, each assigned its own public IP address). It's incredibly messy (and occasionally not even possible) to have multiple servers on the same machine that owns multiple addresses.

Basically, it's a LAN where you use public IP addresses for each machine. Since each mail server is on its own machine, and each machine has a public IP address and is accessible from outside, there's not much configuration beyond routing between the LAN and upstream.


henry128

join:2010-09-03
Mississauga, ON
reply to WolfTears

You'll be renumbering your LAN, so I expect there will be some impact.


WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON

1 edit
reply to WolfTears

theres no way to do this with a multiple routers, seperate networks, nice and neat, not all messy like this???

theres no way i can assign the routers these addresses


henry128

join:2010-09-03
Mississauga, ON

What do you mean by "separate networks"? With an IP subnet, you've being given control over a block of IP addresses. You now need a (real) router to manage them as you see fit. That includes further subnetting, if desired.

If you wish, you can have multiple NAT routers behind your first router. The point is, now that you have an IP subnet, you need a router to manage them, and can no longer rely entirely on the ISP's router to do the work for you.

It's starting to sound like what you were expecting was multiple unrelated static IP addresses acquired using PPPoE, so you don't have to worry about the routing yourself. That would be done by having a separate PPPoE login per address, not by asking for ownership of a subnet. I don't know if Teksavvy provides this service or how it's priced...


WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON

Can you recommend one of these (real) routers you speak of, with a reasonable price point?


morisato

join:2008-03-16
Oshawa, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·TekSavvy DSL
·ELECTRONICBOX

1 recommendation

reply to WolfTears

wow You refer to the mail servers as your customers, And yet you appear to have Zero idea on anything relating to providing them service.. That to me is very scary
--
Every time Someone leaves Sympatico an Angel gets its wings.


henry128

join:2010-09-03
Mississauga, ON
reply to WolfTears

Your current router hardware may work with OpenWRT or DD-WRT firmware (it seems like they work with hardware revision earlier than 6.x. See »wiki.openwrt.org/toh/tp-link/tl-wr941nd and »www.dd-wrt.ca/site/support/router-database). Budget = $0. I have no experience with these, so perhaps someone else can make a better recommendation here.

I personally use a Linux PC. Anything with at least two Ethernet ports running Linux (or FreeBSD, such as in pfSense recommended earlier) should work.



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to WolfTears

1:1 NAT on a consumer router can do this stuff, but you should not be running mail servers on a DSL connection; many RBLs treat any DSL IP as automatic spammers.
--
Latest version of CapSavvy systray usage checker: »CapSavvy v4.2 released!


henry128

join:2010-09-03
Mississauga, ON

Do consumer routers usually have 1:1 NAT on stock firmware, or is it usually only available with custom firmware?



Guspaz
Guspaz
Premium,MVM
join:2001-11-05
Montreal, QC
kudos:23
reply to WolfTears

Probably custom firmware.


toro

join:2006-01-27
Scarborough, ON
kudos:7
Reviews:
·Rogers Hi-Speed
·Bell Sympatico
reply to WolfTears

I've done this with in the past with a router connected to modem, WAN set to PPPoE and NAT DISABLED. The LAN IP address of that router is set to the first public IP address in the /29 subnet you bought. All the other routers and devices that require a public IP address are connected to the LAN side of that router and are assigned static IP addresses from the subnet you bought.
--
Providers (through asterisk): voip.ms, freephoneline, smartcall.ro, ipcomms, callcentric. Hardware: Vonage VDV21, Moto VT2x42, Linksys SPA series, Grandstream HT series, Panasonic KX-TGP5x0
»www.voipfan.net



PlatooN

join:2007-02-13
Kitchener, ON
reply to WolfTears

you should give these poor "customers" their money back. You have A LOT to learn before you are ready to run mail services for domains that actually need uptime.

Lots of ways you can do this, and I doubt anyone here has the patience to hold your hand through it. So after you return these peoples money start researching any of the following.

a) 1 to 1 NAT (aka MIP) -- This is the cheaper way to do this. Less secure as your customer machines will sit on the same internal networks. Bad form and generally done by rookie's

b) Vlanning (aka 802.11Q) -- this is the proper way to do things, but will require a LOT of learning on your part.

c) you can go back to TSI and ask them to give you a /29 routed to a /30 on your PPPoE. This will allow you to connect router 1 to pppoe to get the single IP, then assign public IP's to machines sitting on a switch behind the router. Careful with this setup though as you will lose the added security of the hardware firewall .... but you were already not going to rely only on hardware NAT firewall ... right ..... RIGHT?!?!?

good luck. either way don't rip people off if you don't know what you're doing. Give the rest of us who do this kind of thing for real a bad name.


WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON

Ok, first off, let me set the record straight right now the servers are at an offsite location, more specifically work, I have already changed the mx records and until the point of me moving from my previous residence and acquiring Teksavvy there have been only 10 minutes of down time for the 2 years I have hosted for these customers, before I have been with Rogers for most of my life and had multiple cable modems with multiple static up addresses, so pardon me for not knowing the first thing about point to point. I've never had to deal with it.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4

Rogers only gives static IP's on business-class connections.


WolfTears

join:2013-07-22
North York, ON

I know, I was on a bussiness plan and my bill was breaking the bank, when teksavvy offered these services on a residential plan, for a much better price point I jumped at the oppurtunity.



PlatooN

join:2007-02-13
Kitchener, ON
reply to WolfTears

so you were paying 4-5 * 99 per month for business cable with statics

now you're not

should have no problem affording a 500-600 Juniper router that will do everything you need.