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BB100guy

@shawcable.net

[BC] Upgraded to Broadband 100, ping still the same

Hi
I have upgraded to BB 100 and I'm wondering if I need to upgrade my PCI card to 150 mbps or what I need to do?

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Shaw
Depending on your card, you may see a maximum speed of ~90 mbps, but really you don't NEED to upgrade unless you are trying or need to get every bit of speed out of your connection.

The speed of network card you need to be looking for is 1000 mbps or 1 gbps, that is the next speed faster.
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.

HempHog
Shrewd

join:2004-03-07
Okotoks, AB
Reviews:
·Shaw
reply to BB100guy
You should be using a gigabit ethernet card, a router with gigabit WAN & LAN interfaces. Your ping times wont change.
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»speedtest.net/result/2533761737. ··· 1737.png


BB100guy

@shawcable.net
A router with gigabit wan and lan interfaces? What one do you recommend. I have a D-link DGE530T gigabit ethernet card.


18286719

join:2013-02-02
Whistler, BC
u need gigabit wan and lan on your router, aswell as a computer that can support 1gbps, i have a dir 655 which has gigabit but i was using a standard cat 5 wich could only support 100mbps connection, so you also need to make sure u have a cat 5e or cat 6 cable, when i was on 100mbit i could get 92-93 down, now i get 96-98, also another thing to note, if your using the cisco modem bridged, it has yellow lights when in 100/10mbps and a nice green light when its in 1000

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Shaw
reply to BB100guy
Are you even using a router at this point? Do you have multiple devices connected?

You may be able to get away with the Shaw modem as a router, or if you only have the one computer, just have it bridged, and not use a router at all.
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.

rotohoto

join:2012-03-31
canada
kudos:1
reply to BB100guy
said by HempHog:

Your ping times wont change.

This.

If you're buying new stuff, sure, it's best to make sure it's all gig capable... but hopefully you're not going out and buying a bunch of new stuff with the hopes of lowering your ping times, cuz that's not going to happen.


Bb100guy

@bell.ca
reply to kevinds
I was going out to make sure my stuff was all gig capable but I was just wondering if my ping would change. In what situation would my ping ever change?

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
Different service, would take a different path/route


BB100guy

@shawcable.net
reply to 18286719
lol even after upgrading everything, I'm still getting same results... new router that supports 1gig, cat6 cable, and a DWA566 dlink wireless and new gigabit ethernet card. Going to have to put old stuff back in and return this all and doing it all over again.

tlhIngan

join:2002-07-08
Richmond, BC
kudos:1
reply to BB100guy
Your ping won't change - why would it? Latency and bandwidth are independent variables. You can have low latency, low bandwidth links, low latency, high bandwidth links, high latency, low bandwidth links and high latency high bandwidth links.

Upgrading your service won't improve your ping. Shaw doesn't offer a low ping service option and most ISPs don't offer a "low ping" option. Because most people don't really care - more bandwidth means web pages load faster, downloads zoom, etc. Selling a low ping service is hard to sell versus the shiny "100Mbps!" number.

Your options to get better pings may be switching to Telus, moving house (pings vary by neighbourhood), moving into an apartment serviced by fiber optic providers, or renting an office serviced by fiber optics.

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to kevinds
Sorry, by different service, I mean a different ISP

ravenchilde

join:2011-04-01
kudos:2
reply to tlhIngan
said by tlhIngan:

most ISPs don't offer a "low ping" option.

This is because the Internet (or lets say the TCP/IP Protocol) never had "low latency" as a design factor. DARPA wanted a "reliable" network, that would route around damage to the network and do it's best to deliver packets.

Internetwork routing protocols like OSPF, IS-IS, and EIGRP do their best to find a "Shortest Path" route, but BGP (the actual Internet routing protocol) adds extra variables in. With the dynamic nature of Internet routing (primarily being that it is done automatically by machines, normally with very little human tweaking) latency is rarely a major consideration.

If you want low latency you do not rely on "Layer 3" as we refer to it in the industry. Instead you will purchase a "Layer 2" or 2.5 service. These do not use routing, but often offer much better latency at much higher prices.

For the price of residential internet service, nobody will offer you an SLA for low latency.

kevinds
Premium
join:2003-05-01
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
For the price of residential internet service, nobody will offer you an SLA (of any kind)
--
Yes, I am not employed and looking for IT work. Have passport, will travel.