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DS256
Premium
join:2003-10-25
Markham, ON

Rogers Contact Customers on Computer Problems?

I'm helping out a relative who received a number of phone calls from Rogers. Finally, she got an email with the Rogers phone number on it. When she called it, Rogers reported that they had detected problems with with either her computer or router. They recommended a full security scan and contacting the router vendor if it was still under warranty. They said Rogers could assist if that didn't work for a cost.

I've never heard about Rogers calling with problems but have received a number of Phishing calls saying there is a problem with my computer and they need to get access to it remotely. Since this referred to Rogers standard phone number on the bill, did not ask for access, it sounds legit.

The scan revealed nothing. The router is one I provided to add Wi-Fi capabilities. It was a reconditioned unit I got.

I'm posting this to find out if others have had similar calls and what Rogers is really detecting. Malformed IP packets? Abnormally large number of transmits?

I will not have a chance till next week to investigate physically myself.

Thanks for any insights.


UserX

@rogers.com
Rogers has been known to disable service if malware or suspicious activity coming from a specific address.

They try to inform customers if they can, but some times they disable the service regardless. Customers then have to call into support for assistance.


elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to DS256
said by DS256:

Thanks for any insights.

Rogers has no business scanning anyone's computer without the owner's consent for problems with either their computer or router. This is commonly known as hacking and is illegal in every known country. People go to jail for that. Roger's concerns ENDS at your modem. Rogers DOES NOT have the LEGAL AUTHORIZATION to scan anyone's personal computer at any time or any where.

Your computer and router and home network are PRIVATE PROPERTY.

Phishing scams come in all shapes and forms and can appear legitimate. Any outfit claiming they've detected problems as a result of an ILLEGAL UNINVITED UNAUTHORIZED computer scan/intrusion should be reported to your local Police Cyber Crime Unit. Just contact them and include the offending phishing email you received. At the very least DESTROY the email.

Under no circumstances reply to the phishing email. That could trigger a malware script or worm being deployed. This is how cyber botnets are set up without the computer owner's knowledge.

KKaWing

join:2007-06-14
A bit extreme in reaction there... It could just be Rogers looking at the usage trends and detected a large spike. Or maybe they saw traffic being routed to know scam / phishing addresses. Maybe the Rogers supplied email was sending out spam and was reported.

As long as Rogers don't ask for access in any way shape or form. It sounds legit. All they offered was if you can't fix it or find someone who can, they offer the service. Which is totally optional, you don't have to use the Rogers tech.

I understand the need to be cautious, so not replying to suspicious emails or phone numbers is the right thing to do. There is no harm in calling the Rogers helpline on the bill and see what is going on.


elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2
said by KKaWing:

I understand the need to be cautious, so not replying to suspicious emails or phone numbers is the right thing to do. There is no harm in calling the Rogers helpline on the bill and see what is going on.

Agreed. A bit extreme? Absolutely not. This is no different from fraudulent emails regarding bank account, credit card and any other personal PRIVATE accounts/data/services we employ on a daily basis.

The Police are on TV warning about these scams regularly. Canadian government websites are devoted to them.
Microsoft/authorities spend millions yearly bringing down botnets etc. Canada has a Privacy Commissioner that deals with this very issue (among others). Online safety and security is a top priority for all concerned.

The smart money says it's better to err on the side of caution.


sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
If the phone number in the letter was truly one of Rogers published numbers, then that's the determinant.

Double check that phone number (not just by dialling it!)

JAC70

join:2008-10-20
canada

1 recommendation

reply to elitefx
said by elitefx:

Rogers has no business scanning anyone's computer without the owner's consent for problems with either their computer or router. This is commonly known as hacking and is illegal in every known country. People go to jail for that. Roger's concerns ENDS at your modem. Rogers DOES NOT have the LEGAL AUTHORIZATION to scan anyone's personal computer at any time or any where.

Checking for open ports or suspicious network activity is not hacking, tinfoil hat man.

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to elitefx
said by elitefx:

said by DS256:

Thanks for any insights.

Rogers has no business scanning anyone's computer without the owner's consent for problems with either their computer or router. This is commonly known as hacking and is illegal in every known country. People go to jail for that. Roger's concerns ENDS at your modem. Rogers DOES NOT have the LEGAL AUTHORIZATION to scan anyone's personal computer at any time or any where.

Rogers recommended a scan and offered to assist with that if the customer was willing to pay. If the customer paid that would indicate consent.


DS256
Premium
join:2003-10-25
Markham, ON
reply to DS256
I guess I wasn't clear. I'm used to phishing phone calls saying there is a problem with your PC. Actually just got one this morning. My relative compared the phone number provided against her Rogers bill and it match. Again, when she contacted Rogers, they did not attempt to access her system only to ask she address the problem or they may have to disconnect it.

As someone else mentioned, I suspect they were monitoring outbound IP traffic and noticed a problem that initiated this.

Will be fixed shortly anyway. She's switching from a cable based modem to a Rocket Hub that can travel with her. That will eliminate the router needed for Wi-Fi.


sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
What has happened here is either she's had an unusually high number of DHCP requests, or they've received abuse notification from another user based on an unblocked port.


humanfilth

join:2013-02-14
cyber gutter

2 edits

1 recommendation

reply to DS256
A proper ISP network security scheme is to detect bot/scam/phish traffic on their public network.

Edit: When an ISP sends a 'you've got malware' notice. They need to be specific and not use loose terms about random things that may be causing it. Just state the connection is showing signs of malware. Beware of an ISP that wants in via remote desktop as they will deny responsibility for any damage they cause to your computers during the remote.

The network security probes is to stop on the WAN side of the customers connection and to not probe in to the customers LAN(based on a all in one gateway). With a customer owned router, probes should stop at its WAN and not try to brute force their way in.

Occasionally I read posts on where the ISP, when supplying a gateway, the poster will say that the ISP lists all connected devices on the users LAN. That is an invasion.
The flip side is where the user has locked down their gateways backdoor by either new firmware, using hidden passwords into bridge mode or firewall rules and they get a notice from the ISP about not being able access the unit for doing things.

*
Got a scam email the other day with a reply to Rogers email address. It came from Mexico.
CONTACT PERSON: Mr. Jackson Mike
reply to: westernunionmoneytransfer01 @ rogers.com
Yours Vickie Ann
came from: westernunion @ unam.mx
132.248.194.212
--
Knowledge and curiosity are not crimes and those who are curious should not be treated like criminals.. »www.eff.org/https-everywhere


TOPDAWG
Premium
join:2005-04-27
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to yyzlhr
Wait rogers does paid phone support for pc issues? That is new to me seems fake.

JAC70

join:2008-10-20
canada
said by TOPDAWG:

Wait rogers does paid phone support for pc issues? That is new to me seems fake.

Welcome to your worst nightmare.
»www.rogers.com/web/content/techx ··· echxpert


UserX

@atrianetworks.net
reply to humanfilth
If you are receiving an e-mail from the @rogers.com domain, and it promotes technical services for a cost, then it is a scam as humanfilth pointed out.

Rogers does not care what happens on your LAN. If your address is spewing out bad content that is disrupting their network and other customers near you, then they will shut you down. They try to be nice and inform you, and it is usually by phone.
They may pull the trigger earlier if they cannot reach you and the issues are severe.

The last incident I recall relates to a customer who had multiple machines on his/her LAN. One was taken over by a virus/bot. Needless to say, there was a lot of disruption by the bot and Rogers was compelled to disable the service until the customer cleaned up the machine. Service was restored once the customer cleaned up his/her machine. Rogers will not help clean up infested systems.


sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
UserX, This is exactly what the user is describing ... they care about what happens on your lan if it leaks to the wan.

The offer to clean it up is if they can't get rid of the problem themselves.

It doesn't sound like a scam.

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to UserX
said by UserX :

Rogers will not help clean up infested systems.

Rogers has a paid service called TechExpert where they charge for things like this. They are very happy to help you clean up your infested computer should you need that assistance.

Viper359
Premium
join:2006-09-17
Scarborough, ON
reply to elitefx
Wow, you are wrong on some many fronts. First, they are scanning publicly accessible ports, and they have every legal right, as does anyone else on the internet. They do not need a legal authorization, its their network, they can scan it freely. Second, its not hacking. As a paying Rogers customer, I fully expect them to scan their network and ensure some porn loving adult down the road from me, hasn%u2019t been infected to the gills with trojan's, viruses etc, to ensure no DOS attacks, email spam botnets, etc.

Again, Rogers offers to fix the problem for a fee. Clearly, the person has an issue, and if they cannot fix it themselves, Rogers will try, for a charge. Good. Rogers could just cut off the persons internet access, with no questions asked. I have seen this with friends, they are computer clueless, and Rogers did remote in, and pretty much fix the problem for them. For a rip off fee, but, hey, Rogers isn't in the business of fixing computers. Pay them the fee, or go pay someone else.

Save your armchair lawyer rant. You have no clue what you are talking about. Its Rogers network, and their responsibility to ensure its continued operation by removing anything that might be detrimental to it.

The easiest way to tell if its a scam or really Rogers, is just call the Rogers main telephone line, and ask for whatever department is in the email. I highly doubt that a phisher is not only trying to call the OP, but also sending an email, with suggestions on how to fix, and then offering to fix it for a cost, if that didn't work. Seems like a lot of work, since the internet is fully of dummies.


elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2
said by Viper359:

Save your armchair lawyer rant. You have no clue what you are talking about. Its Rogers network, and their responsibility to ensure its continued operation by removing anything that might be detrimental to it.

WTF????? I was referring to the home network side of the modem NOT the Rogers network side.

And I'm not wrong about ANYTHING here son. My home network is my home network and Rogers has zero right to ANY access past my modem.

That's the way my network is set up and that's the way it stays. Go flame somebody else!

Viper359
Premium
join:2006-09-17
Scarborough, ON
Actually, Rogers does Papa. If you don't lock down your ports, or your router, Rogers, and anyone else, has every right to scan your network finding leaks, holes, and security issues.

You seem to confuse accessing and scanning. Rogers doesn't access anything, they scan ports, sending requests, and await answers.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
reply to TOPDAWG
Rogers has been offering a paid support service for at least a few years now.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
reply to elitefx
You're wrong most of the time. Stop deluding yourself.


MJB

join:2012-01-29
have you ever heard of the 4th amendment the right to privacy gosh...


sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·WIND Mobile
Pardon? The 4th amendment to what? Oh yeah, the AMERICAN constitution. Last time I looked, Rogers and their customers are in *Canada*. The American Constitution does not apply here. In fact good chunks of it don't even apply to Canadians visiting the USA!

I can see it now ... Sue Rogers in Ontario for violations of the 4th Amendment (the Unreasonalbe Search and Seizure Clauses) in an Ontario Court. Let's see what the Justice has to say about that one!


MJB

join:2012-01-29
Reviews:
·VMedia
»ca.answers.yahoo.com/question/in ··· 0AA9n9u2
»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_C ··· Freedoms - section 8

see the fact is that our version is section 8 of the canadian charter of rights and freedoms ... same as the fourth amendment...


sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·WIND Mobile
Yes and no ... Canada's applies to persons present in Canada ... the American to American citizens from what I understand.

Anyway, this is a red herring. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms applies to our governments in respect of its natural persons. It does NOT protect us from corporations. Which is why companies may be legally permitted to search you and your person on entrance and exit from their premises where governments are generally NOT permitted to search you without warrant or accepted good reason.


MJB

join:2012-01-29
Reviews:
·VMedia
well then so.so what he said is that he doesn't want rogers inside his intranet... the lan side of the network.... rogers only covers up to the split near the house or the demarc for cable... a cable company can't be responsible for a intelligent person who knows what he is doing... the can't violate his privacy...... did rogers install all the hardware or build the house.... god... what if the customer did it himself... then they can bug off


sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
Privacy is a different matter covered under other laws.

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
reply to DS256
Nothing in the OPs post makes it clear whether Rogers was looking at the LAN side.

A good ISP should be monitoring traffic coming from customers connections for signs of their computer(s) being infected; especially if it's any kind of botnet infection. If users are infected they should be quarantined until the computer(s) are fixed. There are too many issues that arise from computer(s) being infected like this. It is in everyones best interest to have these computers fixed properly.


humanfilth

join:2013-02-14
cyber gutter

3 edits
reply to sbrook
said by sbrook:

Yes and no ... Canada's applies to persons present in Canada ... the American to American citizens from what I understand.
Anyway, this is a red herring. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms applies to our governments in respect of its natural persons. It does NOT protect us from corporations. Which is why companies may be legally permitted to search you and your person on entrance and exit from their premises where governments are generally NOT permitted to search you without warrant or accepted good reason.

Canadian charter of Rights applies to all people occupying Canada(visitors and residents).
U.S. Constitution applies to all occupying the U.S.(visitors and residents).
The problem lays in where the home government of a person who is visiting in Canada or the U.S., will negotiate to have their countryman not be fully prosecuted under the laws of the country he is visiting. Commit murder in Canada and be prosecuted in Canada, but negotiate to serve your sentence in the U.S. with the flaws of early release as Canada no longer holds him accountable.
If you are visiting Malaysia, then you are expected, within reasonable knowledge of local laws, to respect their laws.

Visiting a corporations building(lets say CTV), the security guard can lightly search you(wand), but they can not touch your genitals/bosom, as that is a crime.
A movie theaters security guard can only visually look in your purse but can not physically search it or you.
Same goes for the airport security guards(TSA), but they molest people and kids on a daily basis anyways and people refuse to research the laws that protect people from being molested.
The above, As per laws regarding security guards and their legal powers of being a private citizen(observe/report) with a fancy uniform. North Vancouver had some mall security guard(power tripping) violently drag a guy out of a wheelchair under the allegation of shoplifting. The security guard committed a crime doing that.
A police officer needs probable cause to stop and search(and not just "well I be searching everyone, so you are next, sucker) and may be allowed touch genitals through clothing in a very probable cause of crime and some obvious hidden loot, as he is now in the process of an arrest. Tasering of the genitals for information is still illegal. Females to be searched by females. Males to be searched by males.

*
*
For OP:
Rogers needs to work on how they contact people to notify of problems. ISP should send an email to call tech security support, with the notation to look on the clients bill for ISP contact information.
Some cases of notification are false positives, which result in much trouble of the user looking for the problem, when the ISP refuses to identify technical criteria of the problem.
--
Knowledge and curiosity are not crimes and those who are curious should not be treated like criminals.. »www.eff.org/https-everywhere

MacrossFreek

join:2001-03-26
Toronto, ON
Several years back I got a call from Rogers about a similar problem.

They told me they were seeing some suspicious/unusual activity from my modem and when I asked for some more specific details, they either said they couldn't go into specifics or didn't want to (I don't remember which). Basically they told me to check all the computers in the house and then asked me to verbally agree to something he read off a piece of paper about abuse of network etc.

I did nothing to any computers and haven't got a call since.