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Dustyn
Premium
join:2003-02-26
Ontario, CAN
kudos:11

1 edit

DTS for new DVD releases?

I've been noticing over the years that DTS is becoming more and more of a rarity on DVD releases. Dolby Digital Surround 5.1-EX is sometimes there, or standard Dolby Digital Surround 5.1.

Are DTS tracks no longer being added to any new DVD titles?

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqU_wlsj8g8

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=GiS5X6Bccz8

For nostalgic purposes the above old school video intros are on many of the Laserdiscs that I own today.
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"Graffiti Wall" Dustyn's Wall »[Serious] RIP

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1

My guess is the Dolby formats are just so dominating. And space, The few DVDs I have seen with DTS have no track other than English. Usually once they start throwing Spanish and French on them the DTS is first to get the snip snip.
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[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
reply to Dustyn

I think Dolby has gained more popularity than DTS, and as Kearnstd said, space on a DVD is at a premium.

If more space is taken for the audio, this means the video has to be compressed further, lowering image quality.

I'm sure you've experienced how the video quality can be rather poor on cheap re-releases of older, lengthy movies containing multiple audio languages and numerous special features all on one disc. They have to use a very low bitrate for the video to fit everything on there. This is why most new movie releases put special features on a separate disc.



Steely
I rise when the sun goes down
Premium
join:2000-10-15
Princeton Junction, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Dustyn

I always choose DTS when given the option. Just sounds better to me.



Dustyn
Premium
join:2003-02-26
Ontario, CAN
kudos:11

Click for full size
Same. It sounds richer or warmer, more dynamic. DTS sounds ever better on a Laserdisc at max 1509.75 kbit/s. DTS on DVD's from what I've read was mostly always encoded at around 754.5 kbit/s. The above shows a DTS 5.1 Laserdisc with a bitrate of 1235 kbit/s.
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"Graffiti Wall" Dustyn's Wall »[Serious] RIP

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1
reply to TheMG

said by TheMG:

I think Dolby has gained more popularity than DTS, and as Kearnstd said, space on a DVD is at a premium.

If more space is taken for the audio, this means the video has to be compressed further, lowering image quality.

I'm sure you've experienced how the video quality can be rather poor on cheap re-releases of older, lengthy movies containing multiple audio languages and numerous special features all on one disc. They have to use a very low bitrate for the video to fit everything on there. This is why most new movie releases put special features on a separate disc.

This is a reason diehard videophiles in Europe sometimes get regionfree players and seek titles designated for US release. Because typically a US release only has Spanish and maybe french, While an EU release will sometimes have French, Spanish, German, English. And that as mentioned eats into video bitrate and compression.
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[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


Steely
I rise when the sun goes down
Premium
join:2000-10-15
Princeton Junction, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Dustyn

I haven't seen or heard a Laserdisc in many moons. I'll have to check out bitrates on some of my DTS discs. Never paid much attention to that.



Dustyn
Premium
join:2003-02-26
Ontario, CAN
kudos:11

1 recommendation

The Grandfather to DVD.
And DTS made it's way onto LDs before DVDs.



Vchat20
Landing is the REAL challenge
Premium
join:2003-09-16
Columbus, OH
reply to Dustyn

The bitrate situation is probably the best explanation. Given the maximum combined playback rate on a DVD is 9-ish mbit (I remember it was 9.xx but not the exact number). DTS rates are max around ~1200kbit and as I read it studios have dropped that to about ~700kbit these days. That is per language track. Dolby can be anywhere from ~256kbit to about ~500kbit under normal DVD usage per language track. I think the common bitrate is around ~384.

Now the kicker is the video which is MPEG2 and is not the most efficient codec in the world. Even for SD to get good DVD quality you want at the very least around 6mbit. Take peaks into account for fast motion scenes. With multiple language tracks, you have close to a full mbit in bandwidth savings between DTS and DD.
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I swear, some people should have pace-makers installed to free up the resources. Breathing and heart beat taxes their whole system, all of their brain cells wasted on life support.-two bit brains, and the second bit is wasted on parity! ~head_spaz