dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1985
share rss forum feed

fefrie

join:2012-08-17
Vancouver, BC
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·TELUS
·FreePhoneLine
·voip.ms

What makes a high end router 'high end'?

I run dd-wrt on my routers, and the only things that matter to me are cpu speed, ram, and flash memory.

So saying that, I have a 7.5/0.5mbit connection running on a router with a 300mhz processor, 32mb ram and 8mb flash.

Since I have some legacy hardware and a 'slow' internet connection I run a G network.

According to the box that it came in, my router a linksys e900 is only good for 3 users.

Am I missing something here? What makes an expensive router any better than a low end router. Yes I know that the type of traffic behaviour will make a difference, but if I look at the cpu load on my router, it is typically almost always near zero and on a bad run it would go as high as 0.50 which still is pretty not bad. And the memory buffer never really maxes out.

I'm asking this because since my tp-link wr1043nd conked out, I found something with similar specs, and refused to pay anything more than $50.

For the most part, everything seems fine. In terms of performance, I would think that the only bottleneck is the ISP bandwidth which is only ever an issue when people torrent, of which there are ways we work around that.



aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1

Try to run a server with several thousand users.



norwegian
Premium
join:2005-02-15
Outback
reply to fefrie

As per the first reply - look up on google for 'enterprise' router.

Then compare the specs to your home router.

However for your needs, to compare something you would call high end as a 'home' router, the price can double if you want specific needs.
Example: If you do not need VPN, this alone can save you quite a bit.
Wireless versus hardwired isn't really a big item, but I know some prefer to have a router than add a wireless access point via a second piece of hardware to allow for better functionality and security. Router is a router, wireless access is just that. Speed, response etc can be affected.

It's like the old 56KB PCI dial up card versus an external dial up modem.
Both can cost the same but I doubt, even though they do the same thing, I'd call them the same. Functionality and security come into play even at that level.
--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke


keno5net

join:2002-01-05
Milwaukee, WI
reply to fefrie

Many of the features that could define "high end" are available because you use DD-WRT. The only other high end features are those that would need to come from the router hardware. Things like gig ports, higher end dual band radio or the latest 802.11 flavors like AC that you don't need if all you want is G.



mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON
reply to fefrie

In business class routers the quality of the components used, the quality of the actual engineering applied and the features/capabilities exposed determin the "class" of the device. The size and workloads determine the product category and price. The heavier the load the heftier the price for the device. Performance is the prime consideration in each class.

Non of the 3rd party firmware available for consumer grade gear can effective compete with the business grade gear --- in my opinion.


switchman

join:1999-11-06
reply to fefrie

So get a ASUS RTN16 and put Tomato on it. It is a good solution at a reasonable price. I have 30/5 service and it handles the load with no issue.

As others have said if you truly want high-end, go with an enterprise router. But I think what you meant was a high end home router.


HELLFIRE
Premium
join:2009-11-25
kudos:15
reply to fefrie

2nd what has already been said about home end gear, and what makes them "high end." If you're happy with what
you got, and don't need any more, then all the power to you OP.

If you want to see "high end" in the enterprise / service provider end, see names like Juniper, Huawei, Cisco, etc.
Also see technologies like 10 / 40 / 100GigE connectivity, see things like In Service Software Upgrade, see things
like 5+ x 9s uptime and reliability and modular / dual chassis and power supplies, see things that are not managed
via a web GUI @ 192.168.1.1, but via CLI and scripting.

Oh yeah, try a "high end" router that costs starting 0.5Meg dollars... and that ONLY gets you an empty chassis shell.

THAT to me is an indication of a "high end" router.

My 00000010bits

Regards


switchman

join:1999-11-06

1 edit
reply to fefrie

Here you go for an example of a high end router.

»resources.alcatel-lucent.com/?cid=158011
Overview Brochure

»www.alcatel-lucent.com/products/···g-system
The 7950 Extensible Routing System (XRS) portfolio is a suite of powerful core routing platforms that delivers unmatched scale, efficiency and versatility without compromising flexibility. The portfolio revolutionizes the economics of delivering the Internet by offering 5 times the density of existing alternatives while consuming only one-third the electricity. With up to 80 100GigE ports in a single rack the 7950 XRS shatters current density norms.


fefrie

join:2012-08-17
Vancouver, BC
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·TELUS
·FreePhoneLine
·voip.ms

1 edit
reply to fefrie

Hey thanks everybody. As i said before, my linksys says it's only good for 3 users. They say that their high end consumer routers are better suited for 7+ users, but only with a processor that is 400/600 mhz.

Right now i have 10 or so clients right now and the network is fine sharing a 7.5 connection.

I know that G is old, but if it only has a real max of 25mbps and the internet can occasionally burst to that speed, i think that signal bandwidth spread over 10 clients isn't a big deal if you consider that web surfing is mostly intermittent and not streaming

Most of the hardware features, i don't need. Dual band, vpn, giga bit



DigitalXeron
There is a lack of sanity

join:2003-12-17
Hamilton, ON

2 edits
reply to fefrie

From my experience, "high-end" is relative (if you're in the ISP arena, you'd be looking at Carrier-class gear that'd be "high-end" versus if you're in the home, good SoHo gear can be considered "high end"). It depends on the emphasis on what you need out of a router.

But generally speaking from a network operations perspective, high-end gear often has/is:

- Commandline access (some high end units lack web interfaces, but a commercial unit of sufficient quality should be able to turn off any web interfaces for security and freeing up RAM)

- Advanced ACLs (source/destination packet filtering, and what interfaces they're accepted on) — configurable by command line

- Advanced routing (being able to set up tunnels, having routers handling VPNs, having the ability to null-route traffic, that is instructing the router to drop traffic based on conditions, being able to have a router without a default gateway if say you're deploying an ISP core router, being able to have dynamically updating routing tables, etc) — configurable by command line

- Route Protocol availability (being able to set up the router to dynamically update network paths between multiple routers with protocols more advanced than RIP, e.g. internally — IS-IS, OSPF, externally — BGP) — configurable by command line

- ASICs (Dedicated specialized processors that say in a router, would be capable of processing a lot more packets than the CPU could, Cisco calls them "Route Processors", these exist almost guaranteed on medium to large routers, if they don't, the unit won't perform well)

- Console ports (being able to connect a serial cable to the unit and check the "local console" if something's up and being able to monitor/intercede at boot)

- Upgradable/replaceable components (say being able to install add-in cards including linecards or inline switches, upgrade memory or swap out the compact flash/storage)

- Rack-mountable (to be able to install it in line with say, company servers, carrier class routers sometimes can take up half to almost an entire rack themselves)

- Have metal chasis (One thing I've noticed is a sign of quality on most network gear is metal undersides at the minimum, plastic all over tends to indicate it's commodity gear)

- Centralized management and monitoring (some vendors have a management platform if you deploy multiple units of theirs in your network, being able to monitor and manage multiple routers from one user interface. Most units you can use vendor-agnostic software to monitor the packet rates, system load, etc and so forth over SNMP, good material for video walls for a NOC)

- Operating System v. Firmware (it's practically impossible to truly "brick" a commercial router in the way one would a home router as there's tricks to reload the operating system, high-end commercial routers have "operating systems" not "firmware", e.g. Cisco IOS or Juniper JunOS)

This is by no means an absolute list, but comparatively speaking, most high-end routers are computers that are hyper-optimized for packet delivery and route path optimization and have many of the management abilities as say, servers do and in some cases more management ability. Most home/SoHo routers do not have all of these features as they do not need them since in such environments you're most likely to set the router up and just let it run as a barely touched device.
--
--Kradorex Xeron
[an error occurred while processing this signature]


HELLFIRE
Premium
join:2009-11-25
kudos:15
reply to fefrie

said by fefrie:

Right now i have 10 or so clients right now and the network is fine sharing a 7.5 connection.

So no speed upgrades planned in the near future... and no one's torrenting / netflixing / streaming / skyping / etc like crazy.
I almost wish I had your userbase OP...

Happy Trails!

Regards

fefrie

join:2012-08-17
Vancouver, BC
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
·TELUS
·FreePhoneLine
·voip.ms

Well we do have that going on, i guess, but no one is really a 'power user'.

And some of those 10 clients are cell phones and tablets, so they're mostly just sitting standby.

And the only upgrade worth having is an upload speed boost to 2.5mbps but that's a cost difference with an upgrade of the router to docis 3.0.



Nightfall
My Goal Is To Deny Yours
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-03
Grand Rapids, MI
Reviews:
·ooma
·Comcast
·Callcentric
·Site5.com
reply to fefrie

Another thing that makes a high end router truly high end is the uptime. With the high end hardware that the router is built from, the router can see years of uptime. We have a couple Cisco 2800 series routers in our remote offices that have been running there for 5+ years without a hiccup. You can't put a price tag on that.
--
My domain - Nightfall.net