dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1188
share rss forum feed

andyboy

join:2011-11-28
New Rochelle, NY

MOCA Bridge--Any limits to number of connected devices?

I will be hooking up an Actiontec MOCA bridge ECB2500CK01 to my router. Is there a limit to the number of devices I can connect with this method? I'm thinking of moving several devices now connected in different parts of the house via powerline to MOCA. I assume I can connect just one bridge to my router and connect various bridges throughout the house all working off of the same router ethernet connection. Thanks

ScrawnyB

join:2004-05-18
Carlisle, PA
kudos:1

andyboy

join:2011-11-28
New Rochelle, NY
Thanks that's very helpful. I am not sure what the channels mean when it comes to MOCA. I plan to connect coax to the bridge near my router and connect that bridge to an open ethernet port on that router. If I connect 4 other devices throughout the house via MOCA bridges, I assume they would all work because they would be on the same channel, correct?


More Fiber
Premium,MVM
join:2005-09-26
West Chester, PA
kudos:31
reply to andyboy
said by andyboy:

I will be hooking up an Actiontec MOCA bridge ECB2500CK01 to my router.

You don't normally connect a MOCA bridge directly to your router. You connect a MOCA bridge to your coax where you need an ethernet connection.
said by andyboy:

Is there a limit to the number of devices I can connect with this method?

Not clear whether you're referring to MOCA devices or ethernet devices. There is no limit to the number of ethernet devices you can connect. The number of MOCA devices depends on the version of your MOCA devices. The limit is 8 for MOCA 1.0. This includes the router, MOCA bridges, and STBs. The limit is 16 if all devices are MOCA 1.1 compliant. If you have a mix of MOCA 1.0 and MOCA 1.1 devices, the limit is 8.
said by andyboy:

I assume I can connect just one bridge to my router

There is no need to connect a MOCA bridge to the router. The router has a built-in MOCA bridge.
said by andyboy:

I am not sure what the channels mean when it comes to MOCA.

A channel is simply a frequency over which MOCA data is transmitted.
said by andyboy:

If I connect 4 other devices throughout the house via MOCA bridges, I assume they would all work because they would be on the same channel, correct?

Yes, assuming you're not exceeding the MOCA device limits.
--
There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary and those who don't.

andyboy

join:2011-11-28
New Rochelle, NY
This is very helpful but I am a bit confused (not by what you wrote but by the instructions that came with the bridge). Here's what I want to do. My AV receiver and a secondary desktop are in different rooms from the router. They are now connected to the internet via powerline adapters. I want to change that connection to get better speeds and better stability (although frankly my powerline setup has been stable for the most part and delivers decent speeds but not taking full advantage of my 50/20 speed). I will be doing this with other ethernet devices too as I purchase them (internet TV for example). Perhaps my confusion stems from not knowing what a MOCA device is. Sounds like I want to connect ethernet not MOCA devices.

I planned to do exactly what you said--connect the bridge in the other rooms to coax and connect the 2 devices via ethernet from the bridge. I didn't plan to connect anything to the router. But the instructions that came with the actiontec bridge said to connect one bridge to coax AND to an open ethernet plug in my router and to connect the other bridge to coax in the other room and connect the devices to the bridge via ethernet.

Sounds like the instructions that came with the bridge are to connect MOCA devices not ethernet devices and that I should do what I originally planned to do and what you suggest above for connecting ethernet devices.

Thanks for your assistance.

ScrawnyB

join:2004-05-18
Carlisle, PA
kudos:1
reply to andyboy
You will probably run into similar issues by using MOCA as a replacement for the Powerline adapters, as MOCA speeds are also limited as well. MOCA is limited to something under 200Mbps I do know. More info: »mocablog.net/faq/

I think in your case, running CAT5e or CAT6 would be best if you are willing to make the effort. CAT5e will get you up to 1Gbps connectivity, and I think CAT6 (with the right equipment) gets you 10Gbps connectivity.

More Fiber made a good point though about the difference between limits between devices ON the MOCA network and those BRIDGED by the network (eg. those that sit behind the bridge). Thanks for that great input, I hadn't immediately considered that as the potential question there.


More Fiber
Premium,MVM
join:2005-09-26
West Chester, PA
kudos:31
reply to andyboy
The instructions that come with the MOCA bridge are not written for FIOS customers. They are written assuming that you do not have a MOCA bridge built-in to the router (which you do).

A MOCA device is something that connects to the coax and transmits MOCA signals. This includes MOCA bridges, STBs, and your router. For the purposes of this discussion, it excludes the ONT, since the ONT is on a different channel.

Do you have FIOS TV? If so, what model STBs do you have?
What hardware revision is your router?
--
There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary and those who don't.

andyboy

join:2011-11-28
New Rochelle, NY
I do have FIOS tv. STB models 7216 (or 7232, don't recall, probably 7216) with multi-room DVR. Router I think is actiontec MI424WR (not sure which REV but I got it about 2 1/2 years ago). Thanks