dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
4614
share rss forum feed


Tom46

@comcast.net

Static IP Address

I've been thinking about installing a security camera at home that I could access via a browser from work. As I understand it, if I have a dynamic IP address, I need to sign up and pay for a host IP service. To avoid that cost, can Comcast assign/sell me a static IP address for my residence? In case it matters, I'm on Extreme 50 using an Arris TM702G/CT modem connected to a Linksys WRT610n router.

For what it's worth, I've been checking my IP address for the last week or so using the Xfinity Speed Test application, and it hasn't changed so far. But, we all have dynamic IPs if I'm understanding right, correct?

Is it a big deal to get a static address? Who would I contact for it? Would it affect anything else?

Thanks for any suggestions.



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

No idea what they would charge for a static IP on residential service if they even offer it. They might even question your need for such and then tell you you can't run a public facing service like that on residential service.

If I were you I would map your dynamic IP to a static hostname that you can get for free from many places. One is »www.noip.com/free/

Many routers support such services and will update the hostname when your dynamic IP changes. Otherwise you will need a client program running on a PC that has to be left on.

My IP has never changed in over 18 months of service.



JohnInSJ
Premium
join:2003-09-22
Aptos, CA
reply to Tom46

You can only get static IPs on business class. It's expensive. You're better off using the noip thing for something like this
--
My place : »www.schettino.us



jack b
Gone Fishing
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
reply to Tom46

You're golden with a free dynamic DNS host service. Simply set it up and forget it.
Or if you end up wanting more than one host, it's cheap enough to buy an annual plan like DYN DNS pro for $25 ($2/mo.)that gives you up to 30 hostnames
--
~Help Find a Cure for Cancer~
~Proud Member of Team Discovery ~



Tom46

@comcast.net
reply to Tom46

Thanks for the suggestions guys. I did look at the No-IP service, and while it is free and would probably work, I noticed as I dug deeper that the free "entry level service" comes with ads, no support, and you must re-subscribe every 30 days. I guess that's the price of free so I shouldn't complain, but it seems a bit of a bother all the same.

Thanks again though. I appreciate the suggestions.



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

Like I said, there are several of those freebie services. Another one that looks fairly painless is »dnsdynamic.org/


kaila

join:2000-10-11
Lincolnshire, IL
reply to Tom46

I think you'll find your current IP is virtually static already- I've had mine for at least two years now.



camper
Premium
join:2010-03-21
Bethel, CT
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to graysonf

I use namecheap for several services, and I have found their service to be very good. They also offer free dynamic dns service.

»www.namecheap.com/products/freedns.aspx

Sometimes, I just would have liked it if they had chosen a different company name. "namecheap" belies the quality of their service.....



FarmerBob

join:2000-12-21
Littleton, CO
Reviews:
·Comcast
·CenturyLink
·EarthLink
·ViaTalk
reply to Tom46

If you haven't purchased your camera system yet, you might look at Samsung. I just installed one and they have their own DyDNS service, iPOLIS. It takes a bit to set it up, but in the long run it is more secure and they have many apps for various platforms for you to access, record and control the system remotely.



Tom46

@comcast.net
reply to Tom46

Thanks again. You guys are a great resource and have been real helpful.


andyross
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-04
Schaumburg, IL
reply to Tom46

As long as you don't change the MAC address of the device connected to your modem (or change the gateway), your address may hold for a very long time. I've had my IP for over 3 years now.



Tom46

@comcast.net

If I upgrade to a better router, will that change the MAC address? I'm not clear what a gateway is. I've got the Arris modem connected by Ethernet cable to the Linksys router. Everything else from there is wireless. Can you clarify for me? Thanks.



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

If you change the router, its interfaces will have their own unique MAC addresses. However, many routers will allow you to change at least the WAN MAC address to one of your choosing. So you can take the MAC from one router and copy it to another.

A gateway as used here is synonymous with a combined modem and NAT router, and possibly to include wireless.



camper
Premium
join:2010-03-21
Bethel, CT
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by graysonf:

So you can take the MAC from one router and copy it to another.

 
If you do that, make sure the first router is not used whilst its MAC address is being used by the second router. Having two devices on a network with the same MAC address results in unhappiness.


MAC_Address

@comcast.net

said by camper:

said by graysonf:

So you can take the MAC from one router and copy it to another.

 
If you do that, make sure the first router is not used whilst its MAC address is being used by the second router. Having two devices on a network with the same MAC address results in unhappiness.

Absolutely right. And to take it one step further, don't sell the old router on eBay or Craigslist If another Comcast customer uses it with their Comcast service, that is also an example of using the same MAC address on the same network...even more unhappiness (for you, for the purchaser of the old router, and for the unlucky Comcast CSR who has to try to figure out what is happening).


camper
Premium
join:2010-03-21
Bethel, CT
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

 
I have a some old 3Com and Kingston network cards (10 and 100mbps flavors), and I use the MAC addresses from those cards when I need a MAC address for some reason.

When I start using the MAC address from one of those cards, I then place that card in a zip-lock bag with a note saying where the MAC address was used.

About ten years ago, I had to help track down a duplicate MAC address on the company network. It was not fun. So now I have been procedural about tracking the MAC addresses when I override one on a NIC. Life has been happier since then.



Streetlight

join:2005-11-07
Colorado Springs, CO
reply to MAC_Address

MAC_Address,

Are you confusing a router with cable modem? The cable provider needs to know the MAC address of the MODEM but why do they need the MAC address of the router? I've changed routers attached to cable modems several times and never worried about the router's MAC. Likewise adding new computers with obviously new NICs and MACs. Changing modems is different because a modem's MAC address is used to register a customer's ISP account with their equipment, upload configuration files to the customer's modem and, as many have reported in these forums, trying to connect a used modem obtained for eBay fails because sometimes they are reported as stolen in cable ISPs' data bases.
--
There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.

Sherlock Holmes in
The Boscombe Valley Mystery
A. C. Doyle
Strand Magazine, October 1891



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

You are missing the point. First off, MAC addresses, regardless of what they are on are unique or supposed to be unique.

The point about cloning a router MAC is that on Comcast's network, your IPv4 address is "tied" to the MAC address of the device connected to the modem. That would be the router if you use one or the PC if plugged directly into the modem.

If you change the MAC address of the router or PC then your IPv4 address is guaranteed to change. But if you change the router or PC and clone the MAC address to be that of what was formerly connected then your IPv4 address will in almost all cases remain the same as it was, assuming you reconnect to the network quickly.

Some people want to change their hardware but want to preserve their IPv4 address. That's why MAC address cloning is used.

Some people want to temporarily change their IPv4 address. To do that you change the MAC address of the router or PC. If you don't wait to long your old IPv4 address will be given back to you when you restore the previously used MAC address.



camper
Premium
join:2010-03-21
Bethel, CT
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to Streetlight

said by Streetlight:

Are you confusing a router with cable modem? The cable provider needs to know the MAC address of the MODEM but why do they need the MAC address of the router? I've changed routers attached to cable modems several times and never worried about the router's MAC ... Changing modems is different because a modem's MAC address is used to register a customer's ISP account with their equipment...

 
Yup, there are two different uses of MAC addresses and two different MAC addresses being discussed.

The MAC address of the cable modem, as you correctly note, is tied to the customer's ISP account. Hence the problems arising when buying used modems.

The MAC address of the router is used, once the modem is online, to obtain an IP address from the ISP's DHCP servers. When I spoke of changing one's MAC address, it is the MAC address of the router of which I spoke.


Streetlight

join:2005-11-07
Colorado Springs, CO

2 edits

Thanks, camper.

I learn something every day from these forums. I should have known that about getting IP addresses from the ISP's DHCP servers. I have set up several routers but maybe only once every five years so it's easy to forget the basics. The last time I fiddled with my router (Netgear WNDR3700) was some time ago to set it up so that it was able to get IPv6 addresses using instructions from these forums. And of course I know that connecting a computer directly to the cable modem instead of through a router changes the IP address of the one machine "network."

--
There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.

Sherlock Holmes in
The Boscombe Valley Mystery
A. C. Doyle
Strand Magazine, October 1891