dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
7
share rss forum feed

Spice300
Premium
join:2006-01-10
reply to Hartflat

Re: Grounding issues with new install

The dish needs to be grounded to bleed off static charge accumulated by the transmitter radiating microwaves onto it to reduce the risk of a lightening strike.

How is your dish mounted (roof, wall, pole in concrete or something else)? Is it mounted to a metal surface?

When there is interference caused by something connected to ground, it usually means the grounding system is improper, i.e. not connected to the Earth, connected to Earth at 2 or more points creating a grounding loop (current flowing from one ground to the other(s) generating the interference) or the grounding wire is conducting power to a load.
--
Wildblue Value Pack, beam 31, Riverside gateway


james1979
Premium
join:2012-10-09
Quinault, WA
said by Spice300:

The dish needs to be grounded to bleed off static charge accumulated by the transmitter radiating microwaves onto it to reduce the risk of a lightening strike.

Interesting. The "word" on the HughesNet community is that the purpose of the grounding is indeed to bleed off a static charge, but for the purposes of the static charge not interfering with the satellite signal. Apparently, it serves both purposes?

Spice300
Premium
join:2006-01-10
Yes, if the static charge builds up a high enough voltage, there would be a spark that would generate electrical interference that could, depending on the location of the spark, be picked up by the amplifier in the TRIA disrupting the signal. It is also possible for such a spark to damage electronic components.


grohgreg
Dunno. Ask The Chief

join:2001-07-05
Dawson Springs, KY

2 edits
reply to james1979
Well, there really is no conventional voltage component to "dish" static. In reality, ungrounded systems develop a charged ionic field, sorta like an invisible "bubble" surrounding the dish. The transmitter is one source of this field, but wind is actually a more significant source. The transmitter causes the field to be positively charged, which in turn can attract negatively charged lightning. Ground the outdoor equipment to code, and there's no ionic "bubble". A second ground is spec'd for cable (sheathing), which does two things; (a) creates a zero reference for the signal riding on the center conductor, and (b) bleeds off any residual electrical noise that may have leaked into the cable.

//greg//
--
Former DirecPC/Direcway/HughesNet customer and forum participant since 2001