dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
116
share rss forum feed

jeff17

join:2000-12-11
US

3 recommendations

nice story.

I don't care. Hack away, read all my email, texts, bills, whatever. Enjoy it. These are the consequences when we communicate digitally/online. Deal with it.


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN

5 recommendations

You obviously misunderstand. Anything that the NSA can use, so can hackers. If there is a backdoor built into anything that allows the NSA to access it, rest assured that someone else can be using it also. That is one of the primary problems with creating a method for the "good guys", nothing stops the "bad guys" from using it also.
--
"Progress isn't made by early risers. It's made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something." - Robert A. Heinlein


ironweasel
Weezy
Premium
join:2000-09-13
Belen, NM
kudos:1

6 recommendations

reply to jeff17
No, these are not the consequences when we communicate digitally.

These are the consequences when an alphabet agency decides it needs to spy on anything and everything in the name of "national security". One can argue the whole point of "if you're not doing anything wrong then you have nothing to hide", but that's just a lame excuse to justify their actions. It doesn't matter if I'm sending an email to my Aunt Gertie or chatting online with a support rep from my cable company - I should be able to do it without having someone basically standing over my shoulder the entire time.

Encryption exists for a reason and I'm sure there are nefarious reasons but there are also plenty of legitimate reasons as well. It's like making sure you have steel doors and bullet proof glass on your house along with the most sophisticated alarm system out there and then giving the keys and access code to your nosy neighbor knowing full well that they like to come snoop around in your house looking for that meth lab you might have. You're not actually the next Walter White, but it's cool if that neighbor comes in and checks your house out all the time, right?
--
I'll be stretching out the rhyme like gravity stretches time.


FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
reply to Kilroy
said by Kilroy:

You obviously misunderstand. Anything that the NSA can use, so can hackers. If there is a backdoor built into anything that allows the NSA to access it, rest assured that someone else can be using it also.

Then why haven't they? If it was easy for hackers to do what the NSA and other national security groups from countries like China do, then there would be no savings account in the country not drained of its money.
--
"If you want to anger a conservative lie to him.
If you want to anger a liberal tell him the truth."


PToN
Premium
join:2001-10-04
Houston, TX
Stop saying "National Security Groups...". These are all "terrorist" organizations and shall be treated as such.


NoSoAble

@sbcglobal.net
reply to Kilroy
Exactly. An army of hackers is working feverishly to discover the backdoors the NSA has placed in operating systems, encryption software, firewalls, routers, etc. These will be found and exploited. And since the NSA has undermined and corrupted the integrity of so many software (and even hardware) vendors, no one is going to be able to trust the fixes when they are released. Many organizations - businesses of all kinds, hospitals, universities, NGOs, etc, etc - have statutory and ethical obligations to securely encrypt and store data. How is this supposed to happen when so much of the security infrastructure has been compromised? The NSA has essentially destroyed the internet as a system for secure data storage and communication.


FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
reply to PToN
said by PToN:

Stop saying "National Security Groups...". These are all "terrorist" organizations and shall be treated as such.

Treated as such by who? You? The UN? I don't think they care what you or the UN thinks. And exactly in what manner will they be treated as terrorists? What actions are you or anyone else going to take to hold them to account?
--
"If you want to anger a conservative lie to him.
If you want to anger a liberal tell him the truth."


Metatron2008
Premium
join:2008-09-02
united state

2 recommendations

reply to jeff17
People in the 30's also didn't have anything to worry about from the Nazi SS if they did nothing wrong, right?

It's not like anyone who has absolute power has ever abused it before, right...??


TelecomEng

@rr.com
reply to FFH5
said by FFH5:

Then why haven't they?

And how do you know they haven't? You obviously do not know much about those groups operate because they typically do not go about announcing their attack vectors or doing grandiose stunts that would garner lots of attention (something totally fanciful and stupid like draining every saving account of its money).


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
reply to Metatron2008
If they have absolute power, AND wished for you to disappear...
You'd already be gone.
Why would they waste time collecting/manufacturing evidence, if none is needed?

jeff17

join:2000-12-11
US
reply to Metatron2008
I didn't say anything about doing nothing wrong... just saying if I choose to send emails to someone, it's logical that every connection point in between me and them has the opportunity to read/log/collect data. I am ok with that.

kerya666

join:2002-12-20
Valrico, FL
reply to jeff17
said by jeff17:

I don't care. Hack away, read all my email, texts, bills, whatever. Enjoy it. These are the consequences when we communicate digitally/online. Deal with it.

Really? Who is setting these imaginary standards/expectations?

jeff17

join:2000-12-11
US
Imagination is at play if you think your data is secure.


Thespis
I'm not an actor, but I play one on TV.
Premium
join:2004-08-03
Keller, TX
reply to jeff17
The same could be said about paper mail. Are you OK with that too?
--
Fast. Cheap. Safe.
Pick two...


skeechan
Ai Otsukaholic
Premium
join:2012-01-26
AA169|170
kudos:2
reply to jeff17
This is the consequence of 2 administrations that sh!t on the Bill of Rights.
--
Nocchi rules.

dra6o0n

join:2011-08-15
Mississauga, ON
reply to Kilroy
And it also lets the 'good guys' look good or victimized, by 'coercing' bad guys to take the blame for those exploits lol.

NSA makes the holes to spy, but lets hackers take the fall in 'causing trouble'.

dra6o0n

join:2011-08-15
Mississauga, ON
reply to NoSoAble
All your 'bitcoin' encryption, isn't really so encrypted by now eh?

dra6o0n

join:2011-08-15
Mississauga, ON
Reviews:
·ITalkBB
reply to tshirt
Do ya ever pay attention to the 'missing person lists' on the entrance of walmarts?
Or even small bits of details that is literally standing in your face as you pass by?

Now do you notice, said list is huge, compared to back then?
How do people, from young kids to old adults, manage to 'vanish' so often?


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
Aliens. or child abductors, or death, or people actually noticing and adding the missing to public lists.
Of all the things causing people to disappear, the gov't is pretty low on the list.
said by dra6o0n:

How do people, from young kids to old adults, manage to 'vanish' so often?


rebus9

join:2002-03-26
Tampa Bay
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Bright House

3 edits
reply to jeff17
said by jeff17:

I didn't say anything about doing nothing wrong... just saying if I choose to send emails to someone, it's logical that every connection point in between me and them has the opportunity to read/log/collect data. I am ok with that.

Well many of us are not OK with it, and it has nothing to do with hiding anything. It has everything to do with privacy.

When I use encryption to send messages, my expectation is it will be safe in transit and read only by the recipient. I shouldn't have to care if the intermediate path has been compromised-- that's the WHOLE PURPOSE of encryption.

But now that the NSA has cracked the very encryption I trusted to keep my stuff safe, it's wise to assume they aren't the only ones on the planet to have done so. Russia, China, and a small list of hostile nations have extremely talented programmers, mathematicians, and cryptanalysts. It's reasonable to assume they've made significant in-roads also, now that we see it CAN be done.

And if Snoden has taught us anything, it's that JUST ONE insider feeling morally obligated can unravel very dark, closely held secrets. Who's to say the next leak won't be the formula for using these crypto exploits? Who's to say Iran or China or Russia aren't already doing it? You think they'd tell us if they were?

Edit to add: I'm glad we know the NSA has broken our crypto systems. We needed to know what we thought was safe, isn't, so we don't ignorantly use them on blind faith. The end result will be better, stronger systems, but that will unfortunately take time.
Expand your moderator at work


SNNN

@symantec.com
reply to jeff17

Re: nice story.

Someone else who is a little behind the curve. Can we have your credit card please,
where you bank maybe, drivers license number...? Remember..."These are the
consequences when we communicate digitally/online."