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Rebbig

@tinginnovators.com

Router Recommendation

Hello,
I wanted to know what people recommend I get for a wireless router. I am in a 2 bedroom apartment (1 floor). One person will be connected with a hardwired Ethernet cable. The other person will be using wifi with a laptop (I think it's a MacBook Pro). Also, we have a Surface Pro tablet, which I believe supports the 5 GHz band (not 100% sure). Anyway, do people have any suggestions? Thank you!



John97
Over The Hills And Far Away
Premium
join:2000-11-14
Spring Hill, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Bright House
·ooma

»www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a···33320062

Best router under $100, IMO.
--
So put me on a highway, and show me a sign.
And take it to the limit one more time...



tipstir

join:2004-11-14
Boca Raton, FL
kudos:1
reply to Rebbig

Not knocking brands but no issues running strong since 2012 is the ESR600H.

Under the hood.
600MHz NPU
256MB DDR3 RAM
High Power Amp
High Power Xtra Range
DNLA /HD Supportive
Power Off Switch
WiFi Off Switch
800MB NAT with NAT Turbine Engine
4x LAN Gigabit Ports 1x WAN Gigabit Ports
WiFi 802.11abgn HT = High Throughput 300 x 300 mbps
4x ANT with 2x Internal 5dBi and 2x External 5dBi
dual band 2.4GHz / 5.0GHz
Dual USB Ports

I've tested this router and it was designed with my specs and feedback since ESR9850, but they have newer one out ESR600. I still like what I added to the list to with ESR600H. Was $54, $84 The price gone up now. If you get one just get the latest firmware which is v1.35.



SoonerAl
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-23
Norman, OK
kudos:5

1 edit
reply to Rebbig

I just bought an ASUS RT-N66R from Best Buy that works very well for me.

»tinyurl.com/Rt-n66rBestBuy

I have a wireless Win 8 laptop, wired Win 7 desktop, wireless HP J4680 AiO (fax/print/scan) device, wireless iPod Touch (4th gen) and a wireless iPad 4. The desktop uses ZyXEL power line adapters to connect to the router.

»www.amazon.com/ZyXEL-PLA4205kit-···duct_top

The Win 8 laptop and the iPad 4 use my private 5 GHZ network while the iPod Touch and HP J4680 use the private 2.4 GHZ network. I also have 5GHZ and 2.4 GHZ guest wireless networks setup.



Rebbig

@tinginnovators.com

Hello,
Thank you for all of your suggestions! Do you guys have any recommendations for cheaper routers, say sub-$50?


fubdap

join:2010-11-05
Lakeville, MN

It will be hard to get a new dual band router under $50. You may be lucky to find a used or refurbished one.



Rebbig

@tinginnovators.com

Hello,
Do you think a dual band router would be really beneficial in my situation? Even if the answer is yes, what about the best non-dual band router for around sub-$50? Again, thanks for your comments as they're very helpful.



Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5

I picked up a refurbished N56U for $50 but that was in Canada.
Concur with its recommendation getting a tad old considering they have the AC66u and the R65U out now but the N56U has mature firmware which is stable.



John97
Over The Hills And Far Away
Premium
join:2000-11-14
Spring Hill, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Bright House
·ooma
reply to Rebbig

said by Anon80:

Hello,
Do you think a dual band router would be really beneficial in my situation? Even if the answer is yes, what about the best non-dual band router for around sub-$50? Again, thanks for your comments as they're very helpful.

In an apartment situation, I'd want as much of my equipment as possible to be on the 5 ghz band so my wireless doesn't cut out every time a neighbor uses their 2.4 ghz cordless phone.

The Asus N53 which is dual-band is available at Tiger Direct for $54.99 after rebate.

»www.tigerdirect.com/applications···=1528870
--
So put me on a highway, and show me a sign.
And take it to the limit one more time...


Anav
Sarcastic Llama? Naw, Just Acerbic
Premium
join:2001-07-16
Dartmouth, NS
kudos:5
reply to Rebbig

Notice John the big difference is the internal switch.
The N53 is 10/100 the N56 is 10/100/1000 ie has a gigabit lan switch.
Stick with the N56U.



John97
Over The Hills And Far Away
Premium
join:2000-11-14
Spring Hill, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Bright House
·ooma

said by Anav:

Notice John the big difference is the internal switch.
The N53 is 10/100 the N56 is 10/100/1000 ie has a gigabit lan switch.
Stick with the N56U.

I am aware, but was trying to address the OP's price requirements.
--
So put me on a highway, and show me a sign.
And take it to the limit one more time...


Rebbig

@UCLA.EDU

Hello,
Again, thank you for your suggestions. I did some more research on some router features and have more questions. What do you guys think of the TPLink WDR3500:
»www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a···=wdr3500
I read the review from smallnetbuilder.com. It seems like a guest network would be something nice to have (this router lacks the feature). A guest network can potentially prevent viruses from guests getting into your network, is that correct? Also, the review says:
"both radios support a 40 MHz only mode, which isn't kosher on the 2.4 GHz band as far as the Wi-Fi Alliance is concerned"
I'm not exactly sure what this means, can anyone shed some light on this?
There's also the Linksys E2500 which I've been considering (this has guest network but is more expensive, around $77), any thoughts on this one?
The Asus N53 seems to be rated less highly than some of these routers I'm mentioning. One review on amazon said that "guest SSIDS are only separate from other 2.4 ghz band SSIDs, NOT from the 5ghz band," which seems really strange to me.



Nightfall
My Goal Is To Deny Yours
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-03
Grand Rapids, MI
Reviews:
·ooma
·Comcast
·Callcentric
·Site5.com

said by Anon80:

Hello,
Again, thank you for your suggestions. I did some more research on some router features and have more questions. What do you guys think of the TPLink WDR3500:
»www.newegg.com/Product/Product.a···=wdr3500
I read the review from smallnetbuilder.com. It seems like a guest network would be something nice to have (this router lacks the feature). A guest network can potentially prevent viruses from guests getting into your network, is that correct? Also, the review says:
"both radios support a 40 MHz only mode, which isn't kosher on the 2.4 GHz band as far as the Wi-Fi Alliance is concerned"
I'm not exactly sure what this means, can anyone shed some light on this?
There's also the Linksys E2500 which I've been considering (this has guest network but is more expensive, around $77), any thoughts on this one?
The Asus N53 seems to be rated less highly than some of these routers I'm mentioning. One review on amazon said that "guest SSIDS are only separate from other 2.4 ghz band SSIDs, NOT from the 5ghz band," which seems really strange to me.

I wouldn't go off of reviews alone. When it comes to consumer equipment, especially routers, there are people who have had good luck and bad luck with certain equipment. That being said, the higher reviewed routers typically are better performing or the most stable. Just don't let a couple bad reviews push you away.

IMHO, you get what you pay for. The ASUS routers are really really good. Course, you pay for those. You are looking for a sub $50 router that has a guest network, dual band, and I am assuming you want stability? You are going to have a problem finding all those things in one package for a low price.

Just be wary that going cheap on a router may be a problem down the road for you. You are more likely to have issues with a $50 router than paying for a piece of quality equipment.

The TP-Link you posted looks good though. I will say that much. I have some brand loyalty to ASUS though since that router hasn't had a single issue since I bought it.

--
My domain - Nightfall.net


Rebbig

@rr.com

What do you think about the Linksys E2500? Is it considered to be a better/more stable router than the TP-Link?



John97
Over The Hills And Far Away
Premium
join:2000-11-14
Spring Hill, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Bright House
·ooma

1 recommendation

I 100% agree with Nightfall's assessment and opinion stated above.

The Linksys is a different class as it's an N600 instead of an N300 device. It's also way above your previously specified sub-$50 price point. With that said, it most certainly SHOULD be a solid piece of equipment. It's certainly a mature piece of equipment as it's been around for 2.5 years. The reviews are good on Amazon but mixed on Newegg. Again, you can't just go with reviews. I own a Linksys/Cisco wireless bridge and it's been rock solid. But, there are a bunch of people who have written bad reviews of it.

The advantage of a guest SSID is that it keeps guests from having access to your local network, so yes, if they have an infected machine it offers you some level of protection in that regard. But the main advantage is privacy/security in general.

Furthermore if you are going to abandon the sub-$50 price range, I stand by my original recommendation. In fact, you can grab an open-box model at Newegg for $75 and save a few bucks. It'll have the full warranty. I've bought numerous open-box items from them and never had a problem.
--
So put me on a highway, and show me a sign.
And take it to the limit one more time...


Fraoch

join:2003-08-01
Cambridge, ON
kudos:2
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to Rebbig

said by [Rebbig :

]Also, the review says:
"both radios support a 40 MHz only mode, which isn't kosher on the 2.4 GHz band as far as the Wi-Fi Alliance is concerned"
I'm not exactly sure what this means, can anyone shed some light on this?

What they're saying here doesn't impact things from your perspective but it will cause frustration for your neighbours.

The previous generation of wireless was 802.11g. It used radio channels that were 20 MHz wide. Its successor, 802.11n (the routers you're looking at in this thread are 802.11n) can use 40 MHz wide channels to increase speed. There's a catch though, those 40 MHz wide channels occupy the same frequency that channels on neighbouring 802.11g networks might be using. This will cause interference with those channels and if the strength is high enough it can knock those other networks off the air entirely.


20 MHz 802.11g channels. Note there are 3 channels in red that don't interfere with each other - these are channels 1, 6 and 11.


40 MHz 802.11n channels. Note how channels overlap across adjacent channels. 40 MHz channels will interfere with others much more easily and it's much harder to find an interference-free channel.

To combat this, Wi-Fi Alliance certified products listen for neighbouring 802.11g networks and if it detects them, it drops the channel width down to 20 MHz automatically.

Non-certified products do whatever they like and many will happily use 40 MHz channels regardless.

This doesn't mean anything for you (in fact, higher speeds!), but it may kick your neighbours out of their own wireless networks. Not nice for sure, and if the situation is reversed for you then you may have issues.