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SweetBearCub

join:2006-11-17
Lakeland, FL

[DD-WRT] Cisco/Linksys E1000 giving a VERY slow Wireless-N signa

I recently switched to Comcast 50 MBps down/10 MBps Up Internet service.

The service works great, except that the two phones and laptop that depend on the wireless router for the connection have nowhere near the speed my desktop has (which is connected to the router via Ethernet).

The router is set to broadcast a Wireless-N (only, not mixed) signal. The desktop gets about 57/11. The phones and laptop get maybe 1/3. (Not one third, but 1 down, 3 up.) Terrible by comparison. I wonder what could be wrong?

The modem is new from Amazon, an Arris CM820A, $72.98 shipped. The router is from my old AT&T setup, a Cisco/Linksys E1000 running DD-WRT "v24-sp2 (06/14/11) mini, SVN revision 17201".

Any help would be appreciated!

Below is a screenshot of the basic wireless settings (not including real SSID or password) of my router.




Thane_Bitter
Inquire within
Premium
join:2005-01-20
Reviews:
·Bell Sympatico

Re: [DD-WRT] Cisco/Linksys E1000 giving a VERY slow Wireless-N s

Simple, you have a bandwidth problem, or rather a limitation of how much data can fit through a channel in the 2.4 GHz spectrum. If you truly want to approach advertised N speeds you really need a wireless router that operates in the 5 GHz spectrum.

What you can do is try changing the setting for channel width from 20 MHz, to Dynamic (might be called 20/40 dynamic, or words to that effect). By enabling this you might get access to twice the channel width and therefore get a boost to your wireless speeds.

You may see some improvement with inconsistent wireless speeds, and if your neighbours Have wireless networks you may see no improvement at all.

SweetBearCub

join:2006-11-17
Lakeland, FL
reply to SweetBearCub
I changed the channel width to 40 Mhz, and that did increase the speeds that my wireless devices were seeing, but not that much, and not consistently. The speeds went to about 12/10 at best, or about 1/3 (same as before) at worst.

The speeds varied wildy from moment to moment.

According to the Wifi Analyzer app on my phone, my router is the strongest in my apartment, as it should be. All others are quite weak, as not many in my building have WiFi, and I am on the top floor (6th), so WiFi from surrounding buildings is weaker up here.

Is the lack of a 5 Ghz router really that bad? If it is, should I just jump directly to an 802.11ac router, as that is the new spec?

Thanks!


Thane_Bitter
Inquire within
Premium
join:2005-01-20
Reviews:
·Bell Sympatico

1 recommendation

The 802.11ac spec is nearly finished and should be finalized sometime next year, however unlike the drawn out operatic saga that occurred to finalize 802.11n, this will pass through much more quickly. You can buy 'ac' devices already but they are expensive and there is no guarantee that the manufacture can or will issue a firmware update to bring the device up to the full spec.

Few people bought 802.11a routers (5GHz band) so there are far fewer devices using it, furthermore to get the full N speeds the manufactures push, you really need to have a router that works in that bandwidth.

Another experiment, if your cell phone ap gives a list the channels used by the other access points, if not just go to metageek.com and download InSSiDer which will give you a pretty little graphical display that also shows channel information. Pick a new channel that is no used, ideally distant from other channels that are in use (for some reason manufactures love using channel 6 as default, and most users don't bother to change channels). Reducing interference might help.

Failing that, run it on G mode (also using a clear channel) and see if that helps. Also there may be a better firmware build available.

If all that fails to help out, yes I would ditch the thing and try a different router. Weighing costs, if it was me, I think I would stick with a dual radio N router, however most of these units are close in price to the AC ones. If you already have AC ready devices it seems logical to skip N and jump into AC.

public

join:2002-01-19
Santa Clara, CA
reply to SweetBearCub
said by SweetBearCub:

I changed the channel width to 40 Mhz, and that did increase the speeds that my wireless devices were seeing, but not that much, and not consistently. The speeds went to about 12/10 at best, or about 1/3 (same as before) at worst.

The speeds varied wildy from moment to moment.

Try changing the ack setting to 100.
Also try a different ddwrt version.
The k26 builds may work better.

SweetBearCub

join:2006-11-17
Lakeland, FL
reply to SweetBearCub
After playing with the settings to no avail, I finally rolled the firmware back to the latest version of stock (2.1.02, build 6). The speeds went up markedly, and they stay steady enough to stream 1080p YouTube videos while holding VOIP calls.