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JaneQPublic

@207.164.79.x

Voltage vs. The World

So, it's been quite a while since we've heard anything about the ongoing Voltage trolling saga.

Anyone have any idea on the status of the case? Is there to be any notice that a decision will be released on "X" date, or will we all just suddenly hear about it in the news?

I suppose the judge has much to think about, given that by caving to Voltage's request (demand), this would likely open a floodgate of abuse in the courts for additional trolls. Yet, he is bound by the law as it is currently written.

Interesting times ahead



ChuckcZar

@teksavvy.com

No one knows anything yet, but hopefully soon Voltage will make another attempt to get their money.


resa1983
Premium
join:2008-03-10
North York, ON
kudos:10
reply to JaneQPublic

Almost 3 months now since the hearing.. Still no decision on the case yet.

At the very least, the docket will update to reflect the Judge has made an order, and it still hasn't been updated. There'll be no notice that a decision will be released, it'll just be released. Chances are you'll hear about it on this site before you hear about it on news websites.
--
Battle.net Tech Support MVP


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to ChuckcZar

said by Anon80:

.... but hopefully soon Voltage will make another attempt to get their money.

Whose money?


JaneQPublic

@207.164.79.x

Well, thats just it, isn't it?
I sense that was a bit of sarcasm in any case.



grunt

@100tb.com
reply to JaneQPublic

I think that the court taking so long to come to a decision is bad news for Voltage, after all what they are asking for is rather simple to grant. I think the judgment is going to come back that they can have the information but with so many restrictions that Voltage is going to work even harder to make the extortion pay off.

Which they will do, after all Canpire claims to have "millions" of other infringing IP addresses, so much money to be made there they won't be stopped easily if at all.



JaneQPublic

@24.114.67.x

Perhaps this is a time that legislators should step in to clarify (and fix) current copyright law. I believe the law should be amended to remove ALL liability to individuals for non-commercial (read: profit) "infringement".

What about then copyright holder's "right" to profit on their investment / business? News flash: no one really has a right to profit on anything... Ask some poor schmuck that just got laid off after working at a firm for X years (while the firm is in fact profitable)... or a family run business that has been pushed out by a strong new competitor. That's capitalism, isn't it?

The issue, as I see it, is that the media firms don't want to lose what has traditionally been a cash cow - milking profits off a work someone created possibly decade previous. Well - the world has changed - the digital age is upon us... Gripe all you want but the fact remains, technology has created a situation where in incremental cost of producing x more units (copies) of a work is in essence zero dollars. Distribution is now worthless - maybe the future lies in some other type of value creation - live performance? Kind of hard to "pirate" attendance at a concert or stage performance!

/end rant


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4

1 recommendation

said by Anon80:

Perhaps this is a time that legislators should step in to clarify (and fix) current copyright law. I believe the law should be amended to remove ALL liability to individuals for non-commercial (read: profit) "infringement".

In your dreams.

Your buddy, Herr Harpler, is getting set to sell all Canadians down the river on copyright. He wants the TPP deal so bad that his pants are beginning to smell ripe.

»live.cjfe.org/Event/Decoding_the···P?Page=0


If - and that's a big if - the TPP comes to fruition, it will dramatically reshape Canadian law in a wide range of areas. While there is much attention on issues such as agriculture, my primary concern focuses on intellectual property and privacy. On both issues, the TPP would reshape Canadian law in very troublesome ways.

....

Third, Canadian copyright law now includes an important distinction with respect to statutory damages as it features a cap of $5000 for all non-commercial infringements. While the reforms have been unsuccessful in stopping thousands of potential lawsuits against individuals, they do ensure that Canadians won't face the threat of hundreds of thousands or even millions in liability for non-commercial infringement.

The government consistently argued that the reform was the right thing to do. Yet the TPP would require Canada to drop the non-commercial cap and restore statutory damages that could climb into the millions of dollars for individual Canadians.

We would have to go through a ratification process, that would include changing domestic law. In other words, after a decade-long debate on copyright was finally concluded, the issue would be re-opened by the TPP and require Canada to make changes if it wanted to formally implement the treaty.


JaneQPublic

@207.164.79.x

Yes, I'm pretty "up to speed" on the TPP shenanigans our "dear leader" is currently trying to pull... And the process of treaty > domestic law implementation.

That's why I raise the point. I simply believe the ethical path is opposite the one our current neo-fascist government is pursuing.

Sigh.


The Mongoose

join:2010-01-05
Toronto, ON
Reviews:
·TekSavvy Cable
reply to JaneQPublic

said by Anon80:

Perhaps this is a time that legislators should step in to clarify (and fix) current copyright law. I believe the law should be amended to remove ALL liability to individuals for non-commercial (read: profit) "infringement".

What about then copyright holder's "right" to profit on their investment / business? News flash: no one really has a right to profit on anything.

Why would anyone make anything if others are legally entitled to steal it? I despise Voltage's trolling as much as the next person, but people who create content deserve to be compensated for their efforts. The issue arises when trolls try to manipulate governments into enforcing this principle through massive violations of individuals' right to privacy.

Of course copyrights should be defended and enforced...but not on behalf of Voltage or Canipre, and certainly not through their extortionist tactics.


humanfilth

join:2013-02-14
cyber gutter
reply to MaynardKrebs

said by MaynardKrebs:

Your buddy, Herr Harpler, is getting set to sell all Canadians down the river on copyright. He wants the TPP deal so bad that his pants are beginning to smell ripe.

Canada is losing its sovereignty in order for the Billionaires of the World to profit.
Yet since Canada's major media is controlled by the same Billionaires, the sheeple barely hear squat about it.
Harper can always share a prison cell with his lord and master, Bush jr.
Other countries laws can never be allowed to bypass justified Canadian law.

Coming up next year: Everyone has to get their lower lip sliced and a plate inserted, as per the laws of the lost African tribe of the Mugumba. Penalties shall be 2 goats and trial by scorpion.
--
Knowledge and curiosity are not crimes and those who are curious should not be treated like criminals.. »www.eff.org/https-everywhere


TwiztedZero
Nine Zero Burp Nine Six
Premium
join:2011-03-31
Toronto, ON
kudos:5
reply to MaynardKrebs




JaneQPublic

@184.151.190.x

Amen to that!

It's sad that I'm beginning not to regognize the country I grew up in and love.

We need a "regime change" ASAP. The next election can't come fast enough. To quote a line from "Office Space" >> "No talent a$$ clown!"