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wingman99

join:2003-12-18
Opelika, AL

What modem should I purchase.

I was wondering what modem should Purchase and also should i get all in one with wireless or separate.


Wayne99021
Premium
join:2004-12-28
Mead, WA
kudos:1

4 recommendations

There are a couple Docs 3 modems a lot of people use. The zoom 5341J and Motorola 6141. Both are 8 channels down and 4 up IPV6 modems.
Stay away from the all-in-one modem wireless gateway units.
Too many problems with the wireless signals.
Just pick up a good IPV6 ready router with one of the above modems and you shouldn't have any problems.


Chris 313
Come get some
Premium
join:2004-07-18
Houma, LA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·Vonage
·Comcast
·Comcast Digital ..

3 recommendations

reply to wingman99
Like Wayne says

This: »www.amazon.com/ARRIS-Motorola-Su···ola+6141

Or: »www.amazon.com/Zoom-DOCSIS-Cable···om+5341j

And routers: »www.amazon.com/RT-N66U-Dual-Band···+RT-N66U

Or: »www.amazon.com/RT-AC66U-Dual-Ban···RT-ac68u

All of these can be found at Best Buy and price matched with Amazon for the best possible price. I price matched down a Motorola 6141 to 46.29 total, down from 100 bucks

Hope that helps you.

wingman99

join:2003-12-18
Opelika, AL
reply to wingman99
Any lower cost wireless routers that are good.

DrSmith

join:2009-02-16
united state
reply to wingman99
Even though you plan to "own" the modem Comcast will control the firmware. That's one valid reason people don't like the all-in-one solutions. They don't want a Comcast firmware change to effect their home network and WiFi settings.

Drawbacks to separate units are that you have to configure, maintain and supply power to each unit and you get some added latency. Also, possible NAT confusion if you are not careful.

We've had an SBG6580 all-in-one running for many months without problems. No reboots, no surprise firmware upgrades, no WiFi troubles. All good. YMMV.

andyross
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-04
Schaumburg, IL

said by DrSmith:

Drawbacks to separate units are that you have to configure, maintain and supply power to each unit and you get some added latency.

Realistically, does having a separate router really make a difference in latency compared to it being built into a gateway?

Also, to add: all of the information is only if you do NOT have phone service from Comcast. Trying to use your own eMTA is a bit more difficult if not impossible.


Wayne99021
Premium
join:2004-12-28
Mead, WA
kudos:1
reply to wingman99
I have always had great service from the Netgear brand routers.
A lot depends on how many units will be running from it and how big an area it will be covering.
You might look at the WNDR 3700v2 and the WNDR4300. I know people who use them and never complain. They are both less than $100.00

mike34
Premium
join:2004-07-17
Central City, PA
reply to DrSmith
said by DrSmith:

Drawbacks to separate units are that you have to configure, maintain and supply power to each unit and you get some added latency.

Insignificant.

DanM64

join:2013-01-10
Mokena, IL
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to wingman99
I have the Motorola SBG6580. I haven't had any connection problems with it at all, though I only use the wireless connection for our smartphones and a laptop. I have EVERYTHING else wired. The wireless is weaker in the gateway than a standalone router would be, but since I prefer to wire everything that wasn't a big deal to me.

If you plan on using wireless for numerous things I would recommend to get the SB6141 or Zoom 5341J. If you rarely use wireless like me the SBG6580 would work perfectly.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
reply to wingman99
D-link dir-655 and dir657 both work well for $40-50 new.
not as new or as many features as the AC66U but will work for many people.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Another choice is to use a gateway for the modem an routing functions and whatever wireless router you have as an AP which may or may not pass an IPv6 address to your wireless devices which for now can function on v4 only.

DrSmith

join:2009-02-16
united state
reply to mike34
said by mike34:

said by DrSmith:

Drawbacks to separate units are that you have to configure, maintain and supply power to each unit and you get some added latency.

Insignificant.

The latency may well be insignificant, unless your router is old and slow. Config and maintenance are hardly insignificant. I'd much rather manage 1 device than 2 or three.

DrSmith

join:2009-02-16
united state

1 edit
reply to DanM64
said by DanM64:

The wireless is weaker in the gateway than a standalone router would be

Where did you get this information? We have found the SBG6580 wireless to be excellent. Currently have 3 PCs, 2 set-top boxes, 2 squeezeboxes, an iPad, a Nexus, 2 kindles, and a TiVo - All with active wireless connections. None with line-of-sight to the SBG6580. All connecting through walls and floors. Streaming video is never a problem. The Broadcom BCM43224 WiFi chipset is a fine B/G/N unit.


Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10

2 recommendations

reply to DrSmith
said by DrSmith:

Drawbacks to separate units are that you have to configure, maintain and supply power to each unit and you get some added latency. Also, possible NAT confusion if you are not careful.

What are you configuring & doing maintenance on a modem?
As for the router: you configure it once & it is done unless you want to change something. Power to each device means two available sockets. That's a big deal? Latency isn't an issue unless there is something wrong with the Ethernet ports, Ethernet cable or of course the router. NAT confusion?

Don't forget that you have way more options & flexibility if 3rd party firmware is available for your router.
--
In God we trust; all others bring data!


DrSmith

join:2009-02-16
united state

What are you configuring & doing maintenance on a modem?

Configuring, not much. Maintenance - yup, plenty. Check the modem event logs every day for connectivity issues or (surprise) new firmware being pushed down when I didn't ask for it.

As for the router: you configure it once & it is done unless you want to change something.

Check my router logs every day for WiFi intrusion attempts. Only takes a second, even less time when both logs are in ONE device!

Power to each device means two available sockets. That's a big deal?

It is when you lose power and want to maximize your internet connection lifetime during a power outage. My UPS keeps a single device going twice as long.

Latency isn't an issue unless there is something wrong with the Ethernet ports, Ethernet cable or of course the router.

agreed.

NAT confusion?

This gets complicated, especially if you run a home server. But you could NAT in your router, or let the bridge-modem do it. There are advantages/disadvantages to either.

Don't forget that you have way more options & flexibility if 3rd party firmware is available for your router.

agreed. DD-WRT open WRT, tomato WRT are all better choices than factory firmware and UI.


Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10

1 recommendation

I will disagree referring to checking the diagnostics of your modem and/or router as maintenance. That is merely a curiosity & not required. I don't check anything unless I have an issue.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to mike34
said by mike34:

said by DrSmith:

Drawbacks to separate units are that you have to configure, maintain and supply power to each unit and you get some added latency.

Insignificant.

While technically there's some added latency its not measurable but just theoretical. (there's a debate about this on cisco's forums, but that debate is D2 hwic vs separate modem, as far as I can tell there is no d3 Hwic so kinda pointless now)

and using a combo unit means the firmware gets controlled by Comcast, the Hwic discussion I mention Comcast would control the firmware of the Hwic not the IOS of the router.
--
semper idem
1KTzRMxN1a2ATrtAAvbmEnMBoY3E2kHtyv


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to DrSmith
said by DrSmith:

said by mike34:

said by DrSmith:

Drawbacks to separate units are that you have to configure, maintain and supply power to each unit and you get some added latency.

Insignificant.

The latency may well be insignificant, unless your router is old and slow. Config and maintenance are hardly insignificant. I'd much rather manage 1 device than 2 or three.

If its a combo unit you are limited as to what you can manage
--
semper idem
1KTzRMxN1a2ATrtAAvbmEnMBoY3E2kHtyv


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to DrSmith
if a new firmware is pushed to the modem you have no control, and if its a combo unit then you might be in trouble as it could break it and you'll be SOL, nothing you can do in that case.

If your wifi security is so crap that you check regularly you're doing it wrong.

Misconception, it'll last just as long, you still have all the hardware to be powered.

ya actual latency is no different
the theoretical case I mention describes the latency added due to more interfaces being passed, and thus more buffers and more cpu's, its very theoretical and you'd never see the difference

NAT, on a standard modem? do you even know what you're doing?
standard modems are bridges and don't have any interaction with NAT
they just pass the traffic at layer 2 to your router which as a consumer router will do the nat. (there is nothing at all you can configure on a standard modem.)
--
semper idem
1KTzRMxN1a2ATrtAAvbmEnMBoY3E2kHtyv

DrSmith

join:2009-02-16
united state
said by DarkLogix:

NAT, on a standard modem? do you even know what you're doing? standard modems are bridges and don't have any interaction with NAT

Right, this would be non-standard and obviously it's no longer a bridge if it is doing NAT. Yes, I know. But as I mentioned things can get more complicated if you run a server.

But here's a real question for all the modem/router separation fans. Which modems can be put into bridged mode by the customer without a call to Comcast support?


Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10
said by DrSmith:

Which modems can be put into bridged mode by the customer without a call to Comcast support?

None as far as I know. Why?

DrSmith

join:2009-02-16
united state
said by Johkal:

None as far as I know. Why?

So, another drawback to separate units could be installation? Dunno about you but every time I've had to call Comcast support it's been the roulette wheel of terror. Some phone techs are great, some will cost you several hours off your life. And when there is a firmware update, do you have to call to set bridged mode again?


Johkal
Cool Cat
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-13
Happy Valley
kudos:10

3 recommendations

This just supports not having a gateway device to begin with.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

3 recommendations

reply to DrSmith
Only gateways need to be set to "bridged mode" (routing/DCHP off) plain modems are already bridges.
Yes gateway are compact and work for some, but the disadvantages of not being able to control and separate the modem from the router outweigh any advantage.
anyone able/capable of setting up a running a even a simple server is likely fully capable of adjusting router settings.


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3

1 edit
reply to DrSmith
said by DrSmith:

said by DarkLogix:

NAT, on a standard modem? do you even know what you're doing? standard modems are bridges and don't have any interaction with NAT

Right, this would be non-standard and obviously it's no longer a bridge if it is doing NAT. Yes, I know. But as I mentioned things can get more complicated if you run a server.

But here's a real question for all the modem/router separation fans. Which modems can be put into bridged mode by the customer without a call to Comcast support?

If you're running Comcast HSI and not BCI then you can't put hardly any in non-bridged mode.

only time briged mode comes up is BCI and SCM/netgear.

though technical if you're running a server then per the AUP you should be using BCI with statics which kinda kills your idea of a nonSMC type unit

With BCI you'd have your router connected to the SMC and have your statics assigned to your router's wan.

I get the feeling you might not have a good grasp on the situation.

there's really no complication that you think there is

ON HSI (IE resi) the modem is a bridge unless you foolishly get a gateway.
then your router gets a DHCP IP
you do all your nat on your router and there is nothing to be done on the modem

on BCI (business class) you would ether use a standard modem and get a dynamic or use a comcast provided gateway and statics. ether way you then have your router connected to the device with a public IP on the wan of your router.

The reason its foolish to use a gateway with DHCP is you lose control of it, and a firmware update might cost you "years off your life"
--
semper idem
1KTzRMxN1a2ATrtAAvbmEnMBoY3E2kHtyv


DarkLogix
Texan and Proud
Premium
join:2008-10-23
Baytown, TX
kudos:3
reply to DrSmith
said by DarkLogix:

said by DrSmith:

said by DarkLogix:

NAT, on a standard modem? do you even know what you're doing? standard modems are bridges and don't have any interaction with NAT

Right, this would be non-standard and obviously it's no longer a bridge if it is doing NAT. Yes, I know. But as I mentioned things can get more complicated if you run a server.

But here's a real question for all the modem/router separation fans. Which modems can be put into bridged mode by the customer without a call to Comcast support?

If you're running Comcast HSI and not BCI then you can't put hardly any in non-bridged mode.

only time briged mode comes up is BCI and SCM/netgear.

though technical if you're running a server then per the AUP you should be using BCI with statics which kinda kills your idea of a nonSMC type unit

With BCI you'd have your router connected to the SMC and have your statics assigned to your router's wan.

I get the feeling you might not have a good grasp on the situation.

there's really no complication that you think there is

ON HSI (IE resi) the modem is a bridge unless you foolishly get a gateway.
then your router gets a DHCP IP
you do all your nat on your router and there is nothing to be done on the modem

on BCI (business class) you would ether use a standard modem and get a dynamic or use a comcast provided gateway and statics. ether way you then have your router connected to the device with a public IP on the wan of your router.

The reason its foolish to use a gateway with DHCP is you lose control of it, and a firmware update might cost you "years off your life"

Short version is a plain modem is only a bridge and not capable of working in any other mode.
--
semper idem
1KTzRMxN1a2ATrtAAvbmEnMBoY3E2kHtyv


Chris 313
Come get some
Premium
join:2004-07-18
Houma, LA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·Vonage
·Comcast
·Comcast Digital ..

1 recommendation

reply to wingman99
said by wingman99:

Any lower cost wireless routers that are good.

If you're looking for cheaper, you might wanna look into this: »www.amazon.com/ASUS-Dual-Band-Wi···+RT-N56U

I have a friend who raves about his and it can do Comcast's 105/20 with no problem.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to wingman99
My setup:

Motorola SB 6141 (owned)
Apple AirPort Extreme

Works fine for me.

Another advantage of separate router/modem combos is the ability to upgrade the router end down the line. Routers become obsolete faster than modems or you may just want something better down the line. It also give you more choice.

And don't take the gateway from Comcast. Many people don't like them. Many people who get stuck with the gateways end up having CC put them in "bridge" mode and use their own router.
--
I've experienced ImOn (when they were McLeod USA), Mediacom, Comcast, and Time Warner and I currently have DirecTV. They are much better than broadcast TV.

I have not and will not cut the cord.


fuziwuzi
Not born yesterday
Premium
join:2005-07-01
Atlanta, GA
reply to wingman99
Word of caution: last weekend a friend wanted to upgrade his old SB5101 to a newer modem (he got emails from Comcast telling him he would need to do so because of system changes). The old modem was his own, so I told him the options of either leasing a new modem from Comcast or buying his own. He chose to buy. So, we went to Best Buy and picked up a Zoom 5341J. Got it home, connected, tried to do the "walled garden" activation but it kept failing with a server issue. So, I called. Tech goes through all the steps, gave him the serial number, MAC, etc. Modem reboots, looks fine, then the tech tells me, "Sorry, we can't activate this modem on your account because it belongs to someone else, the modem is already activated for a different account." The tech then gets all combative, accusing me of having a stolen modem. I explained that I had just come from Best Buy where we'd purchased the modem off the shelf. Tech said there was nothing he could do, the modem could not be activated because it was already active on someone else's account. So, we had to box it up and drive back to Best Buy and exchange it. I asked the guy at Best Buy how am I supposed to know whether the modems on the shelf are already activated or not. He tried to claim there was "no way possible that can happen". Except it did.
Anyway, got a new modem, got it back, "walled garden" still failed, but called, got it registered, and this one was good, it activated fine without issue. I've counseled my friend to keep the receipt in a safe place forever, however.
--
Teabaggers: Destroying America is Priority #1

mike34
Premium
join:2004-07-17
Central City, PA
Could be Best Buy sold him the 5341J I returned a day after I bought it about 6 months ago.

Still shows (along with 4 or 5 others) in my equipment list at comcast.net.