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raccettura

join:2012-12-13

[Other ] Weird crack on edge of ceiling

I have this crack on the edge of my ceiling against a wall, I've tried just spackle it nicely, sand, but it breaks away. Any thoughts on the correct way to remedy this?

It looks like some sort of mesh under it.

I have two photos to show what it looks like:
»imgur.com/a/q46uN/all

I've been just letting it be since I don't want to repeatedly repair it, however I'd love to just repair it and be done with it.

Edit: I should note this is the edge of where the ceiling drops about a foot for the kitchen area. The beige is the wall, the white is the ceiling. That small strip is the wall for that drop. Just in case the perspective is a little weird.



SparkChaser
Premium
join:2000-06-06
Downingtown, PA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

said by raccettura:

I have this crack on the edge of my ceiling against a wall, I've tried just spackle it nicely, sand, but it breaks away. Any thoughts on the correct way to remedy this?

Does it change from summer to winter? I have the same problem and there is something flexing with temperature/moisture. I've tried to fix it over the years but have had no success. I've just sort of live with it.
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"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." - Aldous Huxley

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it." - Neil deGrasse Tyson


54067323

join:2012-09-25
Tuscaloosa, AL
reply to raccettura

said by raccettura:

Any thoughts on the correct way to remedy this?

Re-tape it with fiberglass reinforced tape not that mud-daubers paper tape.


Red_Menace
poking around since 1978

join:2001-11-03
Littleton, CO
reply to raccettura

For those small cracks you can just pump it full of a paintable caulk, which is a bit more flexible than spackle.


iLearn

join:2013-01-16
canada

2 recommendations

reply to raccettura

This may be "roof truss uplift". Not 100% - you can look it up online.


raccettura

join:2012-12-13
reply to raccettura

It is the top floor so temp based/seasonal does make sense.

So I guess the question is a matter of what the consensus is for best repair strategy. I feel like it's to wide of an area (1.5 inches about) to possibly look reasonable with caulk.

Fiberglass reinforced tape sounds interesting... but wouldn't the spackle still crack off?



SparkChaser
Premium
join:2000-06-06
Downingtown, PA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

1 edit
reply to iLearn

said by iLearn:

This may be "roof truss uplift". Not 100% - you can look it up online.

That sounds like it, for my problem. Not sure about the OP, yet.

Thanks for that info

EDIT: Interesting information on truss uplift »www.buildersengineer.com/assets/···4-06.pdf

--
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." - Aldous Huxley

"The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it." - Neil deGrasse Tyson


StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T Midwest
reply to raccettura

said by raccettura:

So I guess the question is a matter of what the consensus is for best repair strategy. I feel like it's to wide of an area (1.5 inches about) to possibly look reasonable with caulk.

The crack in the picture is up to 1.5 inches wide???!!! That's structural. It would have been good to add something to the picture to show scale.


Cho Baka
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-23
there
kudos:2
reply to raccettura

See some of the diagrams in this:
»www.wwta.ab.ca/homeowner/truss-uplift.pdf
--



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to raccettura

said by raccettura:

It is the top floor so temp based/seasonal does make sense.

The top floor is where temperature-based problems would happen because the temperature differential between the living space and the unconditioned attic area above.

Fiberglass reinforced tape sounds interesting... but wouldn't the spackle still crack off?

Since it now appears that the issue is probably a structural proble instead of a finished problem based on the width of the affected area, Fiberglas tape is not a viable solution. The cause of the problem will have to be found to be for a solution can be developed.

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
reply to raccettura

That crack is one and a half inches wide? Can you confirm that? The torn edges of the drywall paper look to be about a quarter of an inch wide, so it's hard to imagine the crack is that wide.



alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to raccettura

I think OP means that the paint peeled 1.5 inches wide, which is probably because a small movement could tear a wider layer of paint.
If it was 1.5" of movement, we'd see a gap or bare drywall


raccettura

join:2012-12-13
reply to raccettura

It's not cracked all the way through. The damaged area is 1.5 inches wide at the widest part. Paint and paper. It never goes deeper than the mesh you see under. It's peeling. The flakes are pretty thin.


MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to raccettura

It's most likely a roof truss issue caused by insufficient insulation at the edge wall due too little insulation in that area.

In order to avoid this type of problem a truss known as a "raised heel" truss is the type which should be used. This type of truss allows a full (R50+) to be installed right up to the edge of the exterior wall »www.neo.ne.gov/home_const/details/42.htm

Conventional trusses don't provide enough height for insulation to eliminate thermal contraction of the ceiling chord - which is likely causing the ceiling cracks.



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY

said by MaynardKrebs:

It's most likely a roof truss issue caused by insufficient insulation at the edge wall due too little insulation in that area.

In order to avoid this type of problem a truss known as a "raised heel" truss is the type which should be used. This type of truss allows a full (R50+) to be installed right up to the edge of the exterior wall »www.neo.ne.gov/home_const/details/42.htm

Conventional trusses don't provide enough height for insulation to eliminate thermal contraction of the ceiling chord - which is likely causing the ceiling cracks.

Unfortunately this isn't the solution to the OP's problem. It's helpful to know if you are doing new construction but certainly isn't a viable option when the home is already built.


StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL
Reviews:
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reply to raccettura

Have you considered crown molding?



kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL
Reviews:
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reply to MaynardKrebs

I wonder how many houses I've worked on in my life (plumber/electrician) and have yet to see this type of truss used. We've had service contracts (5k+ sq ft vacation homes for general maintenance in addition to electric/plumbing) with many of them and have never seen any such damage due to incorrect type of trusses. In central MO you see swings from min to max in temperature and humidity.

It looks to me from the pics that this is not an outside wall and this would not come into play. Without seeing other things, I'm leaning towards a bad installation/tape job or settling issue.



linicx
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join:2002-12-03
United State
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I loved my 110yr old Craftsman Style Bungalow in MO. You would too; it was incredibly easy to repair. The walls were a foot thick. The basement had a coal room plus a coal-to-gas conversion furnace, and the attic had a bat patrol that lived there. I was never cold in the winter, and the bats caught the bugs in the summer.

I have a house a bit like this now. Part of the cracks came as the house settled. Part was caused by the type of old plasterboard that was used, and part caused by improper ventilation in the attic. The insulation installers were kind enough to not use baffles, but then filled the soffit vents with insulation.
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