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ttiiggy
Premium
join:2001-03-27
Bozeman, MT

Oil change. HOT or COLD?

Do you make an effort to change your oil when the engine is hot or cold?
Does it matter? Is it better one way or the other?
Are you supposed to warm up the engine before oil change?
If you are taking your vehicle to a shop you don't have much choice.

Do you [try to] fill your oil filter with new oil before you screw it on?

Hot:
The oil will be hot and probably flow out of the pan better.
Are there more impurities that would be in suspension in the oil instead of settled into the bottom of the pan that draining cold might not get out?
The bearings and cylinders will have oil coating them and won't wear that little bit more that might happen while the filter fills.

Cold:
More of the oil will be settled into the pan to drain out. Is it that much more?
Oil might not drain out as quickly and as well when it is cold. How much more oil is really going to drain out if you let it drip for 5 minutes instead of just letting it quit running out?

Just wondering. Had a discussion. No confrontation or conclusions.
Heard it said that trying to fill the filter with oil didn't make that much difference.
Have one vehicle that the filter is actually pointed DOWN, so no real chance to FILL the filter. It is a mess to take off also because there is no room to get anything normal in there to catch the oil leaking out.
What were they thinking??
There has got to be something that shops use to catch the oil running out...


CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County

1 edit
I drain the oil when it is warm - I see no reason to burn my fingers/hand with hot oil. On my Honda van - I do not add oil since the filter is screwed on laterally - I see no reason to pour new oil all over me and the car.

With the Chrysler van - it went on straight up - I filled it. For the BMW - it has an oil filter housing - after I add the filter to the housing I make sure to coat the entire filter medium with oil.

How much does it matter ? Probably not a ton either way...
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain


BK3

join:2001-04-10
Geneva, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T Yahoo
reply to ttiiggy
I agree with CylonRed. I prefer it to be warm. Not so hot as to be a danger to my skin when (not if) I spill some, and warm enough to flow well.

Plus running it until warm helps to put the crud into suspension into the oil so more crud is removed and not left sitting in the pan.

I usually start the draining, and then let it drain for 30 mins or longer while I do something else, then come back to it after it has had a chance to fully drain.

I personally, have never filled a filter before putting it on any vehicle I have serviced. Too messy with no real benefit. I do, however, put a coating of oil on the rubber seal on the filter in order to ease installation, and help the seal seat properly. I drain, pause, replace the filter, refill, run for a minute to fill the filter, check the level, top off.
--
There is no worse tyranny than to force a man to pay for what he does not want merely because you think it would be good for him.
Robert A. Heinlein, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress


mattmag
Premium,ExMod 2000-03
join:2000-04-09
NW Illinois
kudos:3
reply to ttiiggy

We almost always ended up with at least a warm engine, unless the car was dropped off the night before. Then we would *usually* run it a little so it was again warm. I preferred the improved flow speed of the warmer oil, and I felt it emptied more completely.

We rarely filled the filters, mostly due to the contortions required in most applications to get the filter into place. Yes, they made a mess when you took them off, and it needed to be cleaned up when you were done.

There were special cases however, such as some Porsche's and a couple others, but those of course were not common.


DannyZ
Gentoo Fanboy
Premium
join:2003-01-29
Erie, PA
reply to ttiiggy
I noticed about a half quart more drained when I did my neon hot.


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to ttiiggy
I do my own changes, so I have the time to do it as I please. My typical process is with the engine warm/hot, then let it sit for 10 minutes to allow drain back before draining. If the filter is vertical-up I will fill it full of fresh oil. If it is vertical-down or horizontal I will fill it enough to saturate the filter media inside. The less time oil needs to fill a new filter, the less time oil supply to the engine is absent.


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

1 recommendation

None of my vehicles in the last 15 years or so had a filter positioned in a way to make the installation of a pre-filled filter possible without lots of mess. In some cases, even putting the empty filter ON is enough of a challenge in itself.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


aurgathor

join:2002-12-01
Lynnwood, WA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
reply to DannyZ
I've done oil change when I started in the evening by draining the oil, putting the plug back, and then draining the leftover in the next morning. I did get quite a bit more oil out that way, although the downside of that was that on the first start up the engine was running with less lubrication for a little while.
--
Wacky Races 2012!


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to aurgathor
My wife's 3.3L Grand Caravan has it vertical up. And right behind the radiator, easy to get to from underneath. One of the few things I like about the vehicle. Can fill the filter right to the top and install it with no mess.


MooJohn

join:2005-12-18
Milledgeville, GA
kudos:1
reply to ttiiggy
With today's cars calling for 0w and 5w oils, most of them flow like water in normal summertime temps anyway!
--
John M - Cranky network guy


CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to Lurch77
said by Lurch77:

My wife's 3.3L Grand Caravan has it vertical up. And right behind the radiator, easy to get to from underneath. One of the few things I like about the vehicle. Can fill the filter right to the top and install it with no mess.

Yea - that was the ONLY good thing about our T&C. Only the BMW is easier... Don't even have to get on the ground to change the filter.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
That's how my 4.0L straight six Grand Cherokee is. I can drain the oil without even putting it on jacks because of the ground clearence, and the oil filter is sticking out the side of the engine, reached easily from the top of the engine. The only downside is since it is a horizontal filter, it makes a minor mess when removed. But at least the mess is all caught by the drain pan.


gregamy

join:2003-05-22
Middletown, CT
reply to ttiiggy
The point of warming the engine prior to an oil change is NOT to be able to get all the oil out or to make it less viscous; it's to hold all the crap/impurities/dirt/wear material in suspension in the oil so that it will be drained out with the oil. If you drain the oil from a cold engine then all solids have settled out to the bottom of the oil pan and galleries/passages, and they will not be removed from the engine.

Run it enough to warm the oil and gather up all that crap into the oil, then drain it.

- GA

P.S. Drain some old oil into a clear glass jar and let it sit overnight. You'd be impressed what settles out.


neonhomer
KK4BFN
Premium
join:2004-01-27
Edgewater, FL
Reviews:
·Bright House
reply to ttiiggy
I do my oil changes warm. Usually, the drive to the parts store to get the oil and stuff, the park it (or put up on ramps depending on the vehicle). Open the hood. Gather my tools, and the ground cloth. I try to wait about a hour before doing the deed.

My Jeep (4.0 I6) goes on laterally, but I partially fill it. My van (94 Caravan 3.0) goes on at an angle, and gets filled mostly. Same with the other van (99 Voyager 3.3).

The oil gets drained, and then I let the pan drip for a while. I usually clean the oil cap and set it on the driver's seat or dash to indicate no oil.

My work car I take to oil change places (08 Versa). Spiffy Lube always races the motor right after startup "to build pressure". I don't go there anymore.... I just take it to the Nissan dealer now....
--
"F is for Fire that burns down the whole town...
U is for Uranium...... Bombs...
N is for NO SURVIVORS!!!!!" Sheldon Plankton

Keep Calm and Carry On


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1
reply to ttiiggy
I've come straight from driving to draining the oil I've done it that way for about 3 times, I don't always do it that way due to the oil being so hot.


Sc0tt
Kneedragger
Premium
join:2000-11-13
Stockholm, NJ
reply to ttiiggy
I drive the 6 miles to the parts store then back, then I immediately drain the oil. I've always done oil changes hot. just make sure your hand isn't in the way of the oil stream and you'll be OK.


Anonymous_
Anonymous
Premium
join:2004-06-21
127.0.0.1
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
reply to ttiiggy
said by ttiiggy:

Do you make an effort to change your oil when the engine is hot or cold?
Does it matter? Is it better one way or the other?
Are you supposed to warm up the engine before oil change?
If you are taking your vehicle to a shop you don't have much choice.

Do you [try to] fill your oil filter with new oil before you screw it on?

Hot:
The oil will be hot and probably flow out of the pan better.
Are there more impurities that would be in suspension in the oil instead of settled into the bottom of the pan that draining cold might not get out?
The bearings and cylinders will have oil coating them and won't wear that little bit more that might happen while the filter fills.

Cold:
More of the oil will be settled into the pan to drain out. Is it that much more?
Oil might not drain out as quickly and as well when it is cold. How much more oil is really going to drain out if you let it drip for 5 minutes instead of just letting it quit running out?

Just wondering. Had a discussion. No confrontation or conclusions.
Heard it said that trying to fill the filter with oil didn't make that much difference.
Have one vehicle that the filter is actually pointed DOWN, so no real chance to FILL the filter. It is a mess to take off also because there is no room to get anything normal in there to catch the oil leaking out.
What were they thinking??
There has got to be something that shops use to catch the oil running out...

I just get it done at my local shop for 10$ every 5k miles with my own filter/oil.

still beats having to transport and disposing of the oil as sometimes the close by recycling centers are full.
--
Live Free or Die Hard...

Bikti_t

join:2012-05-09
Glendora, CA
reply to ttiiggy

oil filter

HOT to heck with the lube tech

fill oil filter with oil whenever possible the first start after oil change will produce zero oil pressure for a few seconds that is when you engine wears the most ..
ALSO
early morn start ups produce the most engine wear so don't rev it up till oil psi hits

It is a nominal amount of wear BUT over 100k of wear it adds up

One diesel negine i worked on had a separate oil pump to establish oil psi prior to cranking .. this is a very unique veh ..

Beezel

join:2008-12-15
Las Vegas, NV
said by Bikti_t:

One diesel negine i worked on had a separate oil pump to establish oil psi prior to cranking .. this is a very unique veh ..

That is a pre-lube pump. All our fleet Detroit's and Cummins heavy duty diesels I worked with all had one. They do definitely help with reducing wear. Especially in cold climates.

The pump is usually mounted to the rear of the starter. When you go to start the starter spins and turns the pre-lube pump. It times out after it gets up to pressure. Then the solenoid engages to kick the bendix up to the flywheel to start. It is a pita to replace the starter on one because of it.

Oil centrifuges are another neat item. Oil goes pressurized into a sealed cup which has little pilot holes in it. This causes the oil to shoot out and make the cup spin. Which slings oil through a paper media which catches soot. You would be surprised how much soot oil has in a diesel after it goes through the regular oil filters.