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Jemkim0

@comcast.net

[Roofing] Downspout drain pipe question

I want to run some corrugated pipe from the end of one of my downs to the edge of the driveway but want to bury it it and have it then come up but I'm worried if there will be enough pressure or if there will be issues on heavy flow days.

Here is the approximate scenario. The down runs from the gutter ~12' vertical to the ground. I then want to run the pipe (basically) horizontal for 45' and then come up 10" vertical. Will this work? Can it handle heavy flows? Thoughts?

I'm thinking about adding a y-adapter from another down (15' from the first) and that down comes down 10' vertical from the roof.

Thanks.

Thanks.


kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL

I've worked on a lot of new homes that do it that way, if it ends up working correctly is any ones guess. But then again the builder/gutter people don't want any call backs either ..



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to Jemkim0

As long as the exit is lower than the entrance then the water will come out. Over a long period of time you might end up with sediment build up, but that could take decades. I ran a 4" line down under a sidewalk and the back up to daylight. It never clogged for the 10 years we lived at that house.



StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T Midwest
reply to Jemkim0

This can be called a reverse siphon. My thinking is that you want to use a single piece of pipe for the whole run. You want the input significantly higher than the outlet.

Whether you want poke a small hole (1/4 inch?) at the low spot to drain the pipe slowly after a rain, I don't know. If you do not drain the pipe, there will be stagnant water in the pipe between rains. Maybe a piece of screen or cloth laying over the output would keep out mosquitoes. You clearly don't want any non-waterproof joints, because they will be under pressure.

Just thinking. I have not done this.

Most places would prefer/require that you drain not drain right at the street or sidewalk, and instead into grass that will be able to absorb or slow the rain water.



leibold
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-09
Sunnyvale, CA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
reply to Jemkim0

Do you mean corrugated or perforated pipe ?

Basically what I'm trying to understand is whether you want all of the water that is coming down from the gutter to exit at the 10" vertical spot or is the intend for much/most of the water to drain into the soil along the 45ft horizontal run (the 10" riser only to provide an escape for excess water).

The main concern I would have is possible clogging of the horizontal run from anything entering the gutter (leaves, fine gravel from roof shingles). Depending on the climate freezing of water remaining in the horizontal run might also be an issue.
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PSWired

join:2006-03-26
Annapolis, MD
reply to Jemkim0

Two suggestions: use PVC sewer pipe instead of corrugated pipe if you have any trees or other debris sources. Corrugated pipe will collect solids over time and clog. Also, glue the joints well to prevent root intrusion. Roots will fill corrugated pipe and clog it solid.

Consider putting a tee above ground level where the downspout joins the piping system. Install a grate or screen on the tee to allow water to flow out if the pipe clogs or freezes. This will also provide a cleanout point.



Jemkim0

@comcast.net
reply to leibold

said by leibold:

Do you mean corrugated or perforated pipe ?

Basically what I'm trying to understand is whether you want all of the water that is coming down from the gutter to exit at the 10" vertical spot or is the intend for much/most of the water to drain into the soil along the 45ft horizontal run (the 10" riser only to provide an escape for excess water).

I mean corrugated, non-perforated pipe. I want the water to go down the downspout and exit at the end of the corrugated pipe run. Freezing weather is not an issue; the pipe will be run in the flower bed and barely underground so if it gets clogged after a few years I can easily disconnect it from the house, pull it out of the inch or so it will be underground, flush it out, or replace it if necessary. it will be going slightly uphill for the 45' but only about 10". Ultimately I think this is a question about water pressure and how the down+pipe will perform on heavy flow days (and will it drain properly)?

Thanks.


Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

said by Jemkim0 :

it will be going slightly uphill for the 45' but only about 10".

Wait so the end of the pipe is going to be higher than the start of the pipe? I thought you meant originally that the pipe would go downhill and at the end turn uphill 10" but still be lower than the start.

The end of the pipe must be lower than the start. Somewhere in the middle you can have an uphill run, but it must always stay below the level of the start.


Hall
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-28
Germantown, OH
kudos:2
reply to Jemkim0

said by Jemkim0 :

it will be underground, flush it out, or replace it if necessary. it will be going slightly uphill for the 45' but only about 10"

Dig out that 10" span so that it's NOT higher.


Jemkim0

@comcast.net
reply to Ken

Click for full size
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said by Ken:

Wait so the end of the pipe is going to be higher than the start of the pipe? I thought you meant originally that the pipe would go downhill and at the end turn uphill 10" but still be lower than the start.

Sorry for the confusion. The downspout goes down ~12'. Then it connects to the pipe that flows slightly uphill about 45'. The vertical difference between where the down connects to the pipe and where the pipe exits is ~10-12".

Maybe this will help (not drawn to scale).


mibagent_x
Go giggle the handle
Premium
join:2001-03-04
Barnhart, MO
reply to Jemkim0

Not really following what you are saying about your grade. It is best not to run uphill anywhere. Esp if you are in an are that freezes. Also for runs any longer than 10ft I STRONGLY suggest using smooth wall pipe. 1 it's rigid and helps maintain a gradient and 2 I have had to replace way to much corrugated pipe because it wouldn't drain fast enough. All the ridges slows the water down and in a downpour it's very easy to have your gutters over topped
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Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY

1 recommendation

reply to Jemkim0

If any of your run goes uphill, which apparently it will, your plan is doomed for failure. The low spot will act like a trap in a sink drain and collect everything as well as freeze in the winter. You need to run into some place that the entire run will be downhill. If that's not possible have you considered digging a large French drain (a large hole filled with rock)? That probably will be your best alternative.



Jemkim0

@comcast.net
reply to Jemkim0

Click for full size
Trying again with the pic


StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL
Reviews:
·AT&T Midwest
reply to Jemkim0

Click for full size
Whether rigid or non-perf flex, how about adding a PVC cleanout that is higher than the output? Blow a leaf blower in there to expel water and debris.


Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to Jemkim0

If you use any normal type of connection from the downspout to the underground pipe you will just have water spraying out of the connection and it won't build up high enough to exit the end of the pipe. Your only option would be for a solid pipe with glued water tight joints below the black line and in fact would need to come above the black line on the house side at least 12". That means your underground pipe will be up 2-3 feet above ground at the house, and the pipe will set full of water at all times. That is not a long term solution in my book.


Jemkim0

@comcast.net

Thanks for the responses. I cannot see the images that I or others have provided to this site. All I get is a pixelated bbrreports.com images. Is this site still used and growing anymore?

Thanks.



tmpchaos
Requiescat in pace
Co-Lead Mod
join:2000-04-28
Hoboken, NJ

Most likely you're blocking something you shouldn't be.



Msradell
P.E.
Premium
join:2008-12-25
Louisville, KY
reply to Jemkim0

said by Jemkim0 :

Thanks for the responses. I cannot see the images that I or others have provided to this site. All I get is a pixelated bbrreports.com images. Is this site still used and growing anymore?

Thanks.

Your pictures show up fine for me so may be a problem with your setup.

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
·callwithus
reply to Jemkim0

Yes, the site is working.

The gist of the pictures is that you'll have an underground pipe full of water almost all the time, and that water may even extend up into your downspout if the exit end is high enough.

That is not a good thing, it will stagnate, breed bugs and clog up pretty quickly. To make this work you need the pipe to slope DOWN continually, which may mean regrading your site or pointing the outlet to another location.



StillLearn
Premium
join:2002-03-21
Streamwood, IL
reply to Jemkim0

said by Jemkim0 :

Thanks for the responses. I cannot see the images that I or others have provided to this site. All I get is a pixelated bbrreports.com images.

Try a different browser.

cwm1276

join:2004-01-16
Stillman Valley, IL
reply to Jemkim0

Why not make some kind of dry well at the end of your pipe? Then the water can go down instead of up.