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Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
reply to TuxRaiderPen

Re: Are We Witnessing the Decline of Ubuntu?

said by TuxRaiderPen:

If canoncial insists on their mir, unity nonsense you may see the child distros move back closer to home for their base.. which is good and bad.. Debian does stupid things too! See DFSG for examples.

I think they have been very clear. Mir and Unity is the pivot around which everything will be built around. They want Ubuntu to run on servers, desktops, mobile devices, and TVs. While servers obviously have no need for eith Unity or Mir, everything else needs something that will run across devices and do it well with a consistent user experience. That is why Canonical is basing everything around the Mir/Unity stack. They feel that none of the existing solutions fit the bill.
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firephoto
We the people
Premium
join:2003-03-18
Brewster, WA
said by Maxo:

said by TuxRaiderPen:

If canoncial insists on their mir, unity nonsense you may see the child distros move back closer to home for their base.. which is good and bad.. Debian does stupid things too! See DFSG for examples.

I think they have been very clear. Mir and Unity is the pivot around which everything will be built around. They want Ubuntu to run on servers, desktops, mobile devices, and TVs. While servers obviously have no need for eith Unity or Mir, everything else needs something that will run across devices and do it well with a consistent user experience. That is why Canonical is basing everything around the Mir/Unity stack. They feel that none of the existing solutions fit the bill.

The issue is they took the stance that has worked for Red Hat and create new or support different solutions as being the way forward while downplaying their incompatibility. You can't deny that the public speaking words used to define or defend their decisions is not the reality which is to have control over what they are using.

In a way Canonical has the right idea, they just go about it wrong. They put up the welcome sign but leave you standing at the door till you get the nod of approval. It's not great code, great ideas, great products, it's only the acceptance of what they want to do that lets you in. They socially engineer a community with rules and guidelines and pledges of loyalty but in the end you're either with them or against them.

They could of took KDE, embraced it, used it, and built up a team to support it's users of it. They didn't, they embraced some unhappy GNOME people who had social connection with the community and ran with that with their tweaks that got bigger with every release. They saw other distros as competition, then saw other desktops as competition, and finally saw other toolkits as competition if they could not control any of them. The stronger KDE got within their distro the more roadblocks against KDE they put up. Near the end they had their KDE guy working on fully non-KDE things. You can't succeed if your goal is to hold certain people or things back.

I bring up KDE, I am biased towards it, but there's a reason. Everyone coming up with the next great thing these days is just chasing old accomplishments by others. Before there was even Ubuntu Qt had something working on the mobile platform and not long after KDE itself. A desktop that was and is fully modifiable with configurations, interfaces that could be scripted, it was all passed over because of likely one big glaring detail..

KDE has a huge community, a strong community, and probably the most independent community of all open source projects. They have survived everything that has caused issues, those by their own makings, those by others who change supposed "standards", all of it. Hell, even Microsoft was starting to get worried about the things from KDE that were creeping into Nokia's operation and they took over and gutted it all. That says a lot. The one common thing they have always done throughout is to empower their users with the ability to create what they want on their desktops, or mobile devices. They don't wield control just for the purpose of having that control. They don't paint a box and tell you to play inside the lines, they paint a huge maze and have you try to find a way out. I'm still exploring that maze and it's one of the greatest adventures that only moves along fast when I need to do things different.
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Maxo
Your tax dollars at work.
Premium,VIP
join:2002-11-04
Tallahassee, FL
While generally agreeable to what you are saying, I think these complains boil down "They aren't doing it perfectly." There are so many areas that they could improve on, and there is enough criticism to go around to make up many news articles and opinion pieces.

Of course most companies develop their product and lock it all up behind copyrights, patents, company secrets, NDAs, etc. That is the norm in business. Trying to create a product that is open source, developed in conjunction with a volunteer community, and then balance that with your corporate needs is not something that is done lightly or easily.

Jono Bacon is an absolutely amazing community manager and the grace which he handles Canonicals decisions and the communities feelings is quite astonishing. I bet given permission to speak freely he could tell you plenty of Canonical horror stories.

That said, Canonical could go the Android route and just go it alone, which would be a reasonable approach. But they don't. They have gone through great lengths and spent a large sum of money to engage their community, their upstreams, and their downstreams. All engagements have not been perfect, and they will continue to not be. Furthermore, it is expected that the business needs of Canonical will continue to run orthogonal to other groups. I believe that despite all this what Canonical could do, the status quo, versus what it does do is quite good.
--
"Padre, nobody said war was fun now bowl!" - Sherman T Potter

»maxolasersquad.com/

»maxolasersquad.blogspot.com

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firephoto
We the people
Premium
join:2003-03-18
Brewster, WA
said by Maxo:

Jono Bacon is an absolutely amazing community manager and the grace which he handles Canonicals decisions and the communities feelings is quite astonishing. I bet given permission to speak freely he could tell you plenty of Canonical horror stories.

And that's the issue right there. The organizations and societies and communities shouldn't be propping up the people, and those who support them, that only stand behind an issue because it's their job to say what they say. These are the peoples who's public views change as their jobs change but they gather a following that just hears what they say and looks no deeper into the substance of the matter. "He said it therefore it must be true or best!"
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Say no to astroturfing. go to their profile, start ignoring posts and ignoring what's not true.