dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
1966
share rss forum feed

airdancer02

join:2003-08-24
Dayton, OH

Adjusting printer colors.

New Canon printer is printing red as more orange.
I've found the adjustment page, but don't know what colors to adjust, or whether to go higher or lower.
I have Cyan, Magenta, & Yellow. What makes red, or at least not orange?


SparkChaser
Premium
join:2000-06-06
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
This might help understand it



airdancer02

join:2003-08-24
Dayton, OH
Yes, that's what I wanted. Why was it so hard to find?
I'll have to try more magenta.
Thanks!


mromero
Premium
join:2000-12-07
The O.C.
kudos:1
reply to airdancer02
hmmmm sounds like you should calibrate your monitor, not mess with the color settings on the printer.


mromero
Premium
join:2000-12-07
The O.C.
kudos:1
reply to airdancer02

airdancer02

join:2003-08-24
Dayton, OH

1 edit
Thanks, I'll try that.
This is a brand new monitor, computer And printer in the last month or so.
This is a spreadsheet that was used on the previous computer. It looked red on the monitor & in print.
Now the same file looks red on the monitor but orange in print.


jvmorris
I Am The Man Who Was Not There.
Premium,MVM
join:2001-04-03
Reston, VA
kudos:1
reply to mromero
said by mromero:

hmmmm sounds like you should calibrate your monitor, not mess with the color settings on the printer.

Excellent point. I suspect that, in many cases, the problem is that the monitor's color rendition is incorrect and that this is also more likely than color calibration problems with the printer or, for that matter, the camera. It's just too easy to start fiddling with brightness, contrast, and God knows what else on a monitor for a particular environment and forget about it.

Indeed, what you're really looking for is consistent (and hopefully accurate) color rendition on all three devices. Oh, best make that four -- there's also a possibility that the renditions you're getting (on either the monitor or the printer) are a consequence of settings in the application you're using for post processing.

And, for that matter, ye olde Mark I eyeball may need some correction also. I know that I personally tend to remember/recreate colors that are a bit more vivid than what exists in a real-world situation. (Well, many photographers do that deliberately, truth be told.) People who were there politely commented on that several times. And the comments got more frequent and more emphatic as I began (unknowingly) to develop cataracts. By the time I finally had successful corrective surgery, I was producing some truly bizarre images (some of which are likely still in my gallery here).

A quick Google search came up immediately with one article that seemed to address all these various factors. Mind, I make no claims on the accuracy of the article -- just take it as a starting point, okay? »desktoppub.about.com/cs/colorcal ··· nter.htm There's no obvious date on the article, so it may now be somewhat obsolete.
--
Regards,
Joseph V. Morris