dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
2338
share rss forum feed

blust2

join:2009-07-31
Pittsburgh, PA

Question on free QAM channels.

Hi, I am new here. I hope this is the right place for my question.

I have been a Comcast cable customer for over 20 years. Most TV I watch are programs on network TV (ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC etc). I record the programs on my hard drive video recorders with QAM tuner and watch them later.

This morning I found out Comcast began to scramble all channels including the local stations on free QAM channels. I can no longer use my HDVR unless I go to Comcast and rent their adapters. And I will be limited to one channel a night unless I am home to switch channels during recording. My question is if Verizon have local station programs (ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC) on free QAM channels, so I can switch to Verizon FIOS and keep my routine. Thanks for help.

lijacobs

join:2010-07-30
Lawrence, NY
kudos:1
Vz's method of disabling service when a subscriber quits is much easier than cable's so at present there is no need for them to scramble local network channels. Can't predict the future though.

guppy_fish
Premium
join:2003-12-09
Lakeland, FL
kudos:3
reply to blust2
Yes, I get about 40 channels in the clear on two TV's that have built in QAM tuners, channel naming is a pain, but it certainly works


bohratom
Jersey Shore is back again.

join:2011-07-07
Red Bank NJ
reply to blust2
said by blust2:

My question is if Verizon have local station programs (ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC) on free QAM channels, so I can switch to Verizon FIOS and keep my routine

Yes they do as I do the same recording clear QAM. Just have to subscribe to a TV Package as they will disable QAM at the ONT if you only have internet service.


nycdave
Premium,MVM
join:1999-11-16
Melville, NY
kudos:17
It isn't enabling/disabling QAM at the ONT. It is enabling/disabling the RF video port at the ONT. MoCA and RF share the same physical F connector on the ONT, but they are independent of each other for provisioning purposes.

PJL

join:2008-07-24
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
said by nycdave:

It isn't enabling/disabling QAM at the ONT. It is enabling/disabling the RF video port at the ONT. MoCA and RF share the same physical F connector on the ONT, but they are independent of each other for provisioning purposes.

Hmmm, semantics? QAM is delivered via RF, isn't it? Or did I sleep through that class?


nycdave
Premium,MVM
join:1999-11-16
Melville, NY
kudos:17
Different RF frequencies....The point is MoCA data can be enabled/disabled independently of the RF video 49-880MHz band which carries QAM...

PJL

join:2008-07-24
Long Beach, CA
kudos:3
Ah thanks Dave. I wish there was a tutorial some place on how this all works for use nerds to enjoy.

JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4
reply to blust2
Just one comment regarding Comcast's change - they are required per FCC regulations to give you access to those channels for free for at least 2 years. The FCC originally required an in-home gateway construct, but Comcast has just gone around that by giving away free digital adapters. Not trying to dissuade you from switching, but Comcast is obligated to provide a method to get those locals for free for at least 2 years. I would call them.


aremai

@208.40.147.x
said by JPL:

Just one comment regarding Comcast's change - they are required per FCC regulations to give you access to those channels for free for at least 2 years. The FCC originally required an in-home gateway construct, but Comcast has just gone around that by giving away free digital adapters. Not trying to dissuade you from switching, but Comcast is obligated to provide a method to get those locals for free for at least 2 years. I would call them.

They only have to give them to you in SD though which is what the DTAs do. If he wants those in HD, he'll have to switch.

blust2

join:2009-07-31
Pittsburgh, PA
HD-adapter and SD-adapter are the same price. It is just I need an adapter for every TV and Recorder. In the past, if a recorder is only to record network programs, I directly hook it to the cable using built-in QAM tuner. And the other drawback for the new setup is that the recorder can't automatically switch channels. Guess I now need five recorders for ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and CW, just for the network programs.

JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4
reply to aremai
I don't think that's true. Clear QAM requirements covered HD as well as SD feeds. In order to get the FCC to agree to encrypt locals, the cable companies had to agree that locals (both HD and SD) were available to all customers for free for at least 2 years. The OP does raise a valid point, though - having to use an adapter limits you to one channel at a time.

brmathews

join:2003-09-04
Pittsburgh, PA
Thats where the move to tuners like the HD Homerun prime pay off.

I have 3 tuners for the price of 1 cable card.
Expand your moderator at work

tnsprin

join:2003-07-23
Bradenton, FL
kudos:1
reply to brmathews

Re: Question on free QAM channels.

Don't forget that many, but not all, HD TV's also can view clear QAM without any adapter, just a cable to their tuner. I have 3 TV's with STB's and 6 TV's (including those with stb's) doing clear QAM. Covers all the locals for my area.
Expand your moderator at work

dmine45

join:2002-11-03
Fredericksburg, VA
reply to blust2

Re: Question on free QAM channels.

There are quite a few clear QAM channels. Where I live I'm between two large cities. So on the regular subscribed channel side, I have the major networks from DC, but on the clear QAM side I also get the CBS and Fox station from Richmond, VA. So it's worth splitting the cable and having one go the STB and one go to the RF input of your TV and do a scan.

Note there is no longer any analog on FIOS TV. If you have an old analog TV you'll need a "digital adapter". I forget how much per month they are without looking at my bill, but I think it's $4.99/mo or somewhere in that price range.

JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4
Actually, no you don't need a digital adapter. Analog TVs made after early 2007 had to have built-in QAM tuners, and if your TV is older than that, you can buy an external QAM tuner pretty cheap.


bohratom
Jersey Shore is back again.

join:2011-07-07
Red Bank NJ
said by JPL:

Actually, no you don't need a digital adapter

I think people are getting confused as the OP knows he will not require a QAM adapter for FIOS. The digital adapter was with regards to staying with Comcast, which provides it free for 2 yrs, but the OP wants the ability to record automatically and not have to switch channels manually.

JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4
Actually, the way I read dmine45's post was that if the OP came to FiOS he would need a digital adapter if he had an old analog TV. I was pointing that he wouldn't. If he came to FiOS, the locals are in the clear. And if his TV didn't have a QAM tuner, then he still wouldn't need a digital adapter. An external QAM tuner would work just fine.


bohratom
Jersey Shore is back again.

join:2011-07-07
Red Bank NJ

1 edit
said by JPL:

Actually, the way I read dmine45's post was that if the OP came to FiOS he would need a digital adapter if he had an old analog TV.

Ah OK, I was referring to the OP as he made it clear in the first post he has a HDVR and does not want to have Comcast give him digital adapters....

dmine45

join:2002-11-03
Fredericksburg, VA
reply to JPL
said by JPL:

Actually, no you don't need a digital adapter. Analog TVs made after early 2007 had to have built-in QAM tuners, and if your TV is older than that, you can buy an external QAM tuner pretty cheap.

Not for old CRTs prior to 2007. I still have a couple of those!

Yes, you can get clear QAM adapters for those TVs, but you also don't get the rest of the channels subscribe to. I know that's semi-off topic for this post.


KA3SGM
- -... ...- -
Premium
join:2006-01-17
West Chester, PA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Cricket Broadband
·Verizon FiOS
reply to JPL
said by JPL:

Actually, no you don't need a digital adapter. Analog TVs made after early 2007 had to have built-in QAM tuners, and if your TV is older than that, you can buy an external QAM tuner pretty cheap.

I think the requirement was for a built in ATSC tuner for off-air reception when they switched to broadcast DTV in 2009.
QAM was never a requirement, I have an old TV that was from mid-2008, and it has an ATSC tuner, but not a QAM one.

Many newer TV's have BOTH ATSC and QAM tuners, ATSC being mandatory, but the QAM ones aren't required.

The cheap DTV tuner boxes are for ATSC(8-VSB) signals from an antenna.
--
ROCK 'TIL SUNSET

JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4
You're quite correct - I was confusing QAM for ATSC.


KA3SGM
- -... ...- -
Premium
join:2006-01-17
West Chester, PA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Cricket Broadband
·Verizon FiOS
Oh, and the 2-year rule for free digital adapters was for CableCo's converting their basic cable signal from analog to 100% digital.

Comcast has already been 100% digital for 2 years in most places, it's just they are now Encrypting the existing digital QAM signals, so free adapters would not automatically apply to this transition.
--
ROCK 'TIL SUNSET

JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4
That's not quite correct. In this case, K, you're confusing things . I wasn't referring to analog channels at all. I was referring to local channels being available in the clear. Until recently the FCC required that all cable companies keep those channels unencrypted. Earlier this year the FCC agreed to allow cable providers to encrypt their locals if they provided a way for customers to continue receiving those locals, without having to rent anything, for at least 2 years.

The FCC actually called for cable provider who wanted to go this route to provide access via an in-home gateway. I don't know if Comcast appealed that decision or if they just went full-steam ahead with their own plan - they're providing free digital adapters to customers affected by this. Again, this has nothing to do with analogs. This has to do with cable companies encrypting their locals.

elefante72

join:2010-12-03
East Amherst, NY
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to blust2
Yes for now but currently verizon doesn't encrypt locals. They are clear qam. I use an old HDHR to get two extra tuners and a hdhrp with a cc for everything else.

Also of note is that verizon only puts cci copy prevent on hboish channels. Everything else can be decrypted and copied freely. That is awesome for me as I use plex to watch recorded shows that we originally encrypted. Twc when I had them had control flags on everything. That shuts down any freedom to copy or watch where you want. I'm sure comcast is the same.

Also clear qam channels are not free, the are just not encrypted. You have to have the local tier to get those channels. Don't equate unencrypted with free...just think no bs...

glennbrown

join:2011-04-10
Buffalo, NY
You have the setup I will be going with. I had Verizon TV then about 7 months ago dropped it to go download only with OTA. Decided I miss certain stations that have little to no downloadable or streamable content.

Going to be ordering a HDHR Prime in the next week or two. That is not a bad idea to use my HDHR to get a couple extra tuner for locals.

Someone above mentioned they got 40ish channels via clear qam is that just local SD/HD or are there a few non-broadcast ones that VZ doesn't encrypt?

thetick

join:2009-06-22
White Plains, NY
said by glennbrown:

Someone above mentioned they got 40ish channels via clear qam is that just local SD/HD or are there a few non-broadcast ones that VZ doesn't encrypt?

Should be all the channels received in the two ranges :

Local channels 1-49 except your town's PEG channels
Local sub channels 46X-49X
Note the 'X' above will vary per local market (460-493 for VHO 5).