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bugabuga

join:2004-06-10
Austin, TX

Citizens interests too

I don't think we can really split citizen's interests from city's. After all, obligations will be paid out of taxes and local budget, but citizens are clamoring for normal internet instead of what they get from current franchises.

It's perfectly normal for city to be concerned. It's also perfectly normal for Google to simply bypass them and go with the next eager participant. Once the list of eager places is empty, they might come back and revisit "reluctant" participants.

It's like adopting a cat. If you want a cat but local shelter waves a twenty page form to fill out and wants to do a background check on you, you probably will be very likely to get a cat from some other place, where requirements are not so strict

Oh and I still hate current form of franchise agreements. I understand the theory of equality, but practice means "if our low population / low income areas can't get service _nobody_ should have it", which is a bit... frustrating. It cuts out any chance of having alternative to those well established ISPs that dream about per-byte billing and do everything they can to prevent competition.
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xenophon

join:2007-09-17

Yeah, I suspect OP will get Google fiber in the end as all surrounding burbs are in line to get it. Google has about 20 KC suburbs with agreements, which may take years to deploy in. It's not like OP/Google need an agreement in place now. OP can wait a year or maybe two to see how committed Google is to keeping/maintaining the network and then make a move.


TBBroadband

join:2012-10-26
Fremont, OH
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
·MegaPath

Any city would be smart right now to wait to see what path Google takes. In the end all of these cities that have signed on will take years for the network to be fully built. And only Google knows the uptake on any of the cities/numbers and we should all know by now if they aren't up to google standards they will in fact get rid of these beta at some point. Just like They did with their phone hobby, and their claim of building their own mobile network.


Bengie25

join:2010-04-22
Wisconsin Rapids, WI
Reviews:
·Solarus
reply to bugabuga

"It's like adopting a cat. If you want a cat but local shelter waves a twenty page form to fill out and wants to do a background check on you, you probably will be very likely to get a cat from some other place, where requirements are not so strict "

Like a local farm. They always have spare cats.



morbo
Complete Your Transaction

join:2002-01-22
00000
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to TBBroadband

said by TBBroadband:

Any city would be smart right now to wait to see what path Google takes. In the end all of these cities that have signed on will take years for the network to be fully built.

And in the meantime, what happens? Incumbents either compete on service and price (the cities win) or nothing changes and everyone has the same, terrible service at high prices as always.

Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.


thender
Screen tycoon
Premium
join:2009-01-01
Brooklyn, NY
kudos:1
reply to bugabuga

quote:
It's like adopting a cat. If you want a cat but local shelter waves a twenty page form to fill out and wants to do a background check on you, you probably will be very likely to get a cat from some other place, where requirements are not so strict
Perfect analogy. I was told it would cost $120/cat, 2 cat minimum, home inspection and background check, and I had to pay for shots.

I went on craigslist and found a cat in a day that already had its shots. free.

People have options. Google has thousands of cities filled with people who would cut their firstborn children to get 1 gbps for $70. Why shouldn't they be setting the terms?
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