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keeganrb

join:2013-10-17
Tyler, TX

[BW Meter] When streaming in 4k

Hello everyone. I decided to test and see just how big a 4k video on Youtube was. After watching the 3 minute long video, I saw that it had used approximately 400 MB.

My question is, with 4k eventually creeping into the market, and my cap for the 107/5 being 350GB/month, will this be raised? It is pretty crappy that I go over my cap each month, just from watching Netflix and other streaming services.


moldypickle

join:2009-01-04
Haughton, LA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
4k isn't going to be anywhere NEAR the saturation level that 1080 is right now for quite some time. If SL bumps up the cap soon, it won't be because of 4k video. What they would tell you is that you need to go ahead and pay for business class because that's unlimited.

You are right though, in the future 4k video is going to obliterate data caps. The really worrisome issue isn't the overage fee that you could incur yourself, it's the complete traffic jam that multiple users on the same channel streaming 4k will cause. But on the other hand, we can always hope for .265 or whatever is next to really hammer done on the compression rate (not really understanding the science behind the codec, I'll go ahead and call it magic, lol)
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50/3 Suddenlink : Current
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Cobra11M

join:2010-12-23
Mineral Wells, TX
let's hope before 4K hits saturation level of 1080.. that DOCSIS 3.1 starts to roll out of is...

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
said by Cobra11M:

let's hope before 4K hits saturation level of 1080.. that DOCSIS 3.1 starts to roll out of is...

You don't need DOCSIS 3.1. This is a business issue not a technology issue.


moldypickle

join:2009-01-04
Haughton, LA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
Not really. You do realize that current networks wouldn't be able to come close to handling 4k at 1080 saturation levels? Just taking this step by step. Uncompressed 1080 can take upwards of 40Mbps to stream. Luckily we have compression codecs that practically all online (and home users) streaming services take advantage of, such as h.264. This drops the needed bandwidth down to around 8-10 Mbps for a full 1080 stream of any quality.

So now we step up to 4k video. A raw feed of 4k is something around 300-400 MegaBYTES per second. H.265 is brand new and assuming they can hit their low end goals, it'll still take 20-30 Mbps to stream. That's a CONSTANT 20-30 Mbps, per person streaming. Now scale that up to the saturation level of 1080 streaming.

Considering the average US highspeed connection is something like 7Mbps (just googled that number), a lot of people can barely stream 1080 if they max their connection.

Saying this is a business issue basically points out you don't really have a clue about the technology behind this.
--
50/3 Suddenlink : Current
5/1 CMA : Old
15/2 TWC : Old

34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
said by moldypickle:

Saying this is a business issue basically points out you don't really have a clue about the technology behind this.

There are too many mistakes and assumptions with your post. It's almost not even worth replying to.


moldypickle

join:2009-01-04
Haughton, LA
kudos:3
By all means, prove me wrong if you feel I am. Then we could all learn.


Cabal
Premium
join:2007-01-21
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to keeganrb
The 4K revolution will be televised, and Netflix says you’ll only need 15 Mbps to watch

Not exactly going to "obliterate data caps."
--
If you can't open it, you don't own it.


moldypickle

join:2009-01-04
Haughton, LA
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
Really wish Netflix hadn't started on 4k with their marketing machine. They just managed to get up to 1080 and it's still not as high bitrate as vudu has. I mean sure, you could get 4k to fit in a 15Mbps stream, but you will have to reduce the bitrate even further. Granted Netflix is going to have the advantage of most users likely not running a 150"+ screen so it won't be too terribly noticeable.

If you really want to see what I'm talking about, pick a blueray movie and watch it for detail. Then stream it through Vudu HDX and watch. Then follow up with Netflix (hoping that they even have the title you picked as SuperHD). That's also not taking into account that streaming services use DD+ versus a DTS-HD or MA track. Pretty big difference there. Then there's also the color depth that will be in 4k video. That can add a LOAD of data to a movie.

So I guess after thinking about this a bit more, both sides here could be right. Just that once you cram 4k into a 15 meg stream, you won't have the same quality anymore. I'd honestly be FAR more interested in using h.265 on 1080 content to get a better bitrate than current services.

Brad, I'm also still waiting on you to come back and tell me what all was wrong please. Share the knowledge
--
50/3 Suddenlink : Current
5/1 CMA : Old
15/2 TWC : Old