dslreports logo
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer

Search Topic:
uniqs
957
share rss forum feed


PToN
Premium
join:2001-10-04
Houston, TX

PMP and MDM..?

Hello,

So for the last 12 years i've been pretty much all over the place in the IT field. From installs and troubleshooting to SAN implementations and everything in between.

I think it is time for me to specialize in an specific area. Even when i believe i'm proficient in many areas, being a "general practice doctor", wont cut it anymore when applying for higher end jobs.

I do like the planning and strategizing when working on projects and different implementations. And recently i've noticed that the title "Master Data Management and Governance" is popping up more and more.

So i would like to specifically get into that area. Ideally i would pursue whatever certs for Data Management there is (havent researched this) and a PMP or Six Sigma.

Has anyone here done anything related to the Data management and governance part? I do have materials for PMP and Six Sigma, but none for the other one. Maybe someone can recommend something based on experience...

Thanks


donoreo
Premium
join:2002-05-30
North York, ON
So that is what MDM is.


Nightfall
My Goal Is To Deny Yours
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-03
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:1
Reviews:
·ooma
·Comcast
·Callcentric
reply to PToN
I thought MDM stood for Mobile Device Management.

I really don't know if specializing is the best thing when it comes to IT. There are far more general purpose, jack of all trades jobs than there are specialized positions. I suppose if you are going to be specialized, then it probably pays to be specialized in something that is very high value. I have a friend who is a data storage engineer for Netapp, and his specialty is knowing Netapp storage obviously. He does very well for himself. I also have a friend who is a Database Manager, and his expertise in SQL is very high. He also does well for himself.

When it comes to the PMP, I have been tempted to go this route myself. The cool part is that you don't need to be specialized to earn a PMP. They can be used even with a jack of all trades position. It just makes you more of a project manager. The thing that has turned me off about the PMP are all the credits you have to earn to keep it up.
--
My domain - Nightfall.net


donoreo
Premium
join:2002-05-30
North York, ON
said by Nightfall:

When it comes to the PMP, I have been tempted to go this route myself. The cool part is that you don't need to be specialized to earn a PMP. They can be used even with a jack of all trades position. It just makes you more of a project manager. The thing that has turned me off about the PMP are all the credits you have to earn to keep it up.

It has been proven over and over you do not need to know anything to be a PM, just having a PMP seems enough
--
The irony of common sense, it is not that common.
I cannot deny anything I did not say.
A kitten dies every time someone uses "then" and "than" incorrectly.
I mock people who give their children odd spelling of names.


PToN
Premium
join:2001-10-04
Houston, TX
reply to Nightfall
I agree with what you say about PMP, but based on the job descriptions about MDM (as inflated and over the top we know IT job requirements can be), it seems a bit more intricate than what you could find on a day to day basis. (»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_dat ··· nagement)

»ecm.elearningcurve.com/CIMP_Trac ··· /134.htm


Nightfall
My Goal Is To Deny Yours
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-03
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:1
Reviews:
·ooma
·Comcast
·Callcentric
said by PToN:

I agree with what you say about PMP, but based on the job descriptions about MDM (as inflated and over the top we know IT job requirements can be), it seems a bit more intricate than what you could find on a day to day basis. (»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_dat ··· nagement)

»ecm.elearningcurve.com/CIMP_Trac ··· /134.htm

Those jobs are also going to be rare.

When you are talking about being more marketable and specialized, there is a big difference.

Being specialized in something SOMETIMES means that you are sacrificing the general knowledge that you have for something specific. For example, I have a friend who is an Exchange expert. He has his certs in Exchange and AD, college degree, and lots of experience. At the same time though, through the years, he has grown weaker in other areas. He lost all his knowledge of SQL for instance.

That Master of Data Management looks interesting, but I don't have anyone in my area even looking for something like that. Why spend time specializing in that if no one is looking for it? If I was going to specialize at this stage in my career, it would be in Database Management.
--
My domain - Nightfall.net


donoreo
Premium
join:2002-05-30
North York, ON
reply to Nightfall
said by Nightfall:

I thought MDM stood for Mobile Device Management.

I think in some cases it does.


Kilroy
Premium,MVM
join:2002-11-21
Saint Paul, MN
said by donoreo:

said by Nightfall:

I thought MDM stood for Mobile Device Management.

I think in some cases it does.

Hence why I ask people for the meanings of the acronyms they use. OSD may mean Operating System Deployment to you, but On Screen Display for others.
--
"Progress isn't made by early risers. It's made by lazy men trying to find easier ways to do something." - Robert A. Heinlein


JB
Stay Gold
Premium
join:2009-05-14
kudos:1
reply to Nightfall
Yep, PMP's have never impressed me. (people holding them or the requirements/program itself)


Drex
Beer...The other white meat.
Premium
join:2000-02-24
Not There
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse

1 edit
reply to Nightfall

said by Nightfall:I suppose if you are going to be specialized, then it probably pays to be specialized in something that is very high value. I have a friend who is a data storage engineer for Netapp, and his specialty is knowing Netapp storage obviously. He does very well for himself.

I would most certainly agree with this. I have a friend of mine who in my opinion is one of the leading storage guys in the nation. He's also 1099 and travels 100% of the time. He knows his stuff though. Also is very knowledgeable with VMware.
Personally I want to stay hands-on technical, but think I've sorta peaked with regards to that. I might have to go the IT management route in the near future.
--
I'm actually not funny, I'm just really mean and people think I'm joking.



Nightfall
My Goal Is To Deny Yours
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-03
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:1
Reviews:
·ooma
·Comcast
·Callcentric
said by Drex:

said by Nightfall:I suppose if you are going to be specialized, then it probably pays to be specialized in something that is very high value. I have a friend who is a data storage engineer for Netapp, and his specialty is knowing Netapp storage obviously. He does very well for himself.

I would most certainly agree with this. I have a friend of mine who in my opinion is one of the leading storage guys in the nation. He's also 1099 and travels 100% of the time. He knows his stuff though. Also is very knowledgeable with VMware.
Personally I want to stay hands-on technical, but think I've sorta peaked with regards to that. I might have to go the IT management route in the near future.

Thats the route I went. Went back to school, got my Masters, and worked on my soft skills in leadership, motivation, and teaching. I even started teaching as a adjunct professor at a local university to help with improving my teaching ability. Found out I love teaching, but thats another story.

Just about all IT management positions require some kind of bachleors degree with a masters preferred.
--
My domain - Nightfall.net


Drex
Beer...The other white meat.
Premium
join:2000-02-24
Not There
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
said by Nightfall:

Just about all IT management positions require some kind of bachleors degree with a masters preferred.

The bachelors I got. Would love to get the Masters, but many factors prevent that right now...the main two being time and money.
--
I'm actually not funny, I'm just really mean and people think I'm joking.


Nightfall
My Goal Is To Deny Yours
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-03
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:1
Reviews:
·ooma
·Comcast
·Callcentric
reply to JB
said by JB:

Yep, PMP's have never impressed me. (people holding them or the requirements/program itself)

Certifications are not impressive on their own. The only thing impressive on its own is experience. The degree and certs merely augment the experience. If someone went the route of getting the certs and degree, it does help matters.
--
My domain - Nightfall.net


Nightfall
My Goal Is To Deny Yours
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-03
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:1
Reviews:
·ooma
·Comcast
·Callcentric
reply to Drex
said by Drex:

said by Nightfall:

Just about all IT management positions require some kind of bachleors degree with a masters preferred.

The bachelors I got. Would love to get the Masters, but many factors prevent that right now...the main two being time and money.

I got my company to pay for my Masters. The time part of things is more difficult to obtain.
--
My domain - Nightfall.net


tubbynet
reminds me of the danse russe
Premium,MVM
join:2008-01-16
Chandler, AZ
kudos:1
reply to Nightfall
said by Nightfall:

I suppose if you are going to be specialized, then it probably pays to be specialized in something that is very high value.

this.
obviously -- if you're highly specialized -- you need to be working within an enterprise that places high value on such a specialized resource and will ensure that he stays specialized.
otherwise -- you'll need to work at an oem/partner/var -- where you can specialize and do this specific type of work all the time. this is the route i've chosen. i can stay specialized in cisco routing and switching (and slowly expand on my own terms) and not be forced into learning something new or being pushed to be a "generalist". i am valuable because of my ability to solve complex routing and switching problems across a large number of platforms and underlying technologies.

in an "admin" role -- you start losing some of that -- simply by nature of your job. its tough.

q.
--
"...if I in my north room dance naked, grotesquely before my mirror waving my shirt round my head and singing softly to myself..."


GILXA1226
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-29
Dayton, OH
reply to JB
said by JB:

Yep, PMP's have never impressed me. (people holding them or the requirements/program itself)

So with the PMP cert, it all depends on how truthful people are on their time/educational requirements to get the PMP, and whether or not they get audited.

Since PMI only audit's about 5%, it's fairly easy to get by, and I've seen some PMP's who fall into this category. However I probably know more PMP's who don't. It all depends on your experience.

Full awareness: I am a PMP.
--
We don't give a d@mn for the whole state of Michigan... we're from OHIO! O!H! ... I!O!


linicx
Caveat Emptor
Premium
join:2002-12-03
United State
It sounds like a Masters in Engineering would be appropriate. Maybe not.
--
Mac: No windows, No Gates, Apple inside


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable
reply to PToN
said by PToN:

I think it is time for me to specialize in an specific area. Even when i believe i'm proficient in many areas, being a "general practice doctor", wont cut it anymore when applying for higher end jobs.

I wholeheartedly agree with this.

It's good to be young and think you're skilled at everything but it really is a "jack of all trades, master of none" even if you think you're a master of everything. Until you're officially a specialist in a certain area, you're a master of your own domain which is basically worthless as far as the industry that pays you is concerned.

We all know that IT certifications mean sweet-FA as far as skill goes (maybe with the exception of Cisco certs), but once you have all the IT certs the next thing you need is the certifications that show you're capable of doing more than what everyone else can do.

I'd start with PMP since it's an easy cert to obtain. After you get that you can condescendingly use terms that other IT people don't know to prove you're better than them

Another alternative route to travel is to get your legal IT certifications. Around here, large law firms bigger cities pay big bucks for third party IT people with such certs to basically clone drives and complete other mind numbingly easy tasks for a very decent salary.

I don't believe there's much of a draw to specialize in MDM but if you see many job openings at a decent wage then perhaps it might be something to pursue.


azimuth

@comcastbusiness.net
reply to donoreo
said by donoreo:

It has been proven over and over you do not need to know anything to be a PM, just having a PMP seems enough

I disagree -- PMs must have 3 critical skills:

1. Schedule conference calls and Webex meetings, as often as possible, whether needed or not.

2. Create meaningless Gantt charts that no one will ever look at again.

3. Respond to every query with "We'll need a change order authorization for that" while exhibiting no technical knowledge whatsoever.


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
4. Utilize every PM phrase that can be used at any opportunity to ensure that you assert yourself as the dominant personality in every communication with someone that's not a PM.

Oedipus

join:2005-05-09
kudos:1
Mitigate scope creep while packaging the deliverables for the stakeholders.


azimuth

@comcastbusiness.net
... and don't forget to "reach out" and "circle back around" to everyone whenever possible.

Damn, I really hate those expressions.


JB
Stay Gold
Premium
join:2009-05-14
kudos:1
reply to azimuth
LOL, glad I'm not alone in this boat..


Nightfall
My Goal Is To Deny Yours
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-03
Grand Rapids, MI
kudos:1
Reviews:
·ooma
·Comcast
·Callcentric
reply to PToN
As someone who does some project management, I will agree that all it feels like is babysitting. Making sure that all the parties are talking to me in order to achieve a common goal. I am glad I don't do project management all the time. Still, its a useful skill to have.
--
My domain - Nightfall.net