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wardarden

join:2013-10-21
USA

[HomeSecurity] HomeSecurity - NO HEAT - No call backs

10-19-13 I had the Home Security installed June 1st 2013. Was not very impressed with installer. Well now that it is getting colder I've tried to turn on my heat tonight and the thermostat will not turn on my heat. I have a split system. Central heat/ gas heat. Previously had a 3 way thermostat. I am 99.9% sure the installer didn't wire the thermostat correctly!!! Going to be a cold night!! NOT A HAPPY COMCAST CUSTOMER!!

10-21.13 Going on day 3 with no heat. Promises for a call from a tech and a visit because my case is escalated as an "emergency" case and no one has called or come.

This is beyond ridiculously pathetic customer service. Have called corporate office in Philadelphia and am supposed to receive a call back before the end of the day... (and another night in the 30's?)

At this point I am thinking that this is definitely grounds for terminating the 2 year contract that I signed! The problem is I really like the home security "services" such as the cameras and security system. However on the other end I have never experienced such horrible customer service. Aagghh!

A Ward (a very unhappy customer!)
Middle TN
.



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

Didn't you test everything connected to this back in June?


wardarden

join:2013-10-21
USA
reply to wardarden

No, I don't recall testing it back in June. The bottom line is I have not heat NOW and their customer service is making promises and not following through. This is just the tip of the iceberg with the problems I have had with the Xfinity Home Security home service.

A



graysonf
Premium,MVM
join:1999-07-16
Fort Lauderdale, FL
kudos:2

Lesson learned, I suppose.

I would have tried to verified it all worked before allowing the installation technician to leave.

Did the technician who installed it have you sign anything before he left? If so, what does it say?



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to wardarden

Call an HVAC company and have the old thermostat/new basic stat/new grade A programmable stat installed.
very likely ANY HVAC service guy can find and fix a wiring fault in minutes. save the bill for comcast. either they pay or they uninstall/restore old system.



gar187er
I do this for a living

join:2006-06-24
Dover, DE
kudos:4
reply to wardarden

if your central air works, and your central heat doesnt, it would point to your furnace. there arent many wires for a thermostat, kinda hard to screw up 4 wires.

does the blower motor kick on? why not pull the thermo and check the wires yourself?
--
I'm better than you!


rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA
reply to wardarden

Did you use the AC during the summer?


wardarden

join:2013-10-21
USA
reply to wardarden

Yes, the central air works fine. A Comcast tech finally showed up yesterday afternoon and said that the thermostat that they use is not compatable with my hybrid (Air, Heat Pump, Furnace) system and that the installer should have never put that thermostat in. That my old thermostat would have to be reinstalled but that he was not authorized by his supervisor to do that. They would get in touch with the contract installers that installed my Home Security and they will have to come out and reinstall my old thermostat. And have not heard from anyone since.
REALLY!!! Once again... I repeat.... This is beyond ridiculously pathetic customer service! And have not heard from anyone since.


neufuse

join:2006-12-06
James Creek, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast

hey it could be worse...

I have a millivolt system, which uses two wires... two to the thermostat to the furnace and from the furnace two more to the AC unit... Comcast INSISTED that their thermostat would work with my system... hate to tell you Comcast, your old relay type thermostat doesn't control communicating / millivolt systems with two wire...


Foxy

join:2010-04-10
Eugene, OR
reply to wardarden

I considered Comcast home security a little over a year ago but when I called I found that they couldn't correctly answer a question about cellular backup in the event the cable was cut. The rep repeatedly discussed the interface between my cell phone and the system (their iPhone app) rather than the system's use of cellular backup to report an alarm event if the cable was out. That made me reconsider and decide to go with a local company which has outstanding customer service. Their Honeywell based system won't control my hybrid heat system either but they at least knew that.



IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to wardarden

I know here in Massachusetts they are not allowed to install the thermostats. They have to leave the thermostat with the customer and the customer either has to hire a licensed contractor to install it or install it themselves.

They are getting into a grey area with their home security offerings in terms of regulatory compliance, many states require alarm technicians to be licensed.

I know they cannot install their smoke detectors in Mass either as they don't meet Mass building codes. I know they have hardwired light switches, I installed one of those myself (I have the home control package, not home security) but they strongly advice that those be installed by a licensed electrician.
--
I've experienced ImOn (when they were McLeod USA), Mediacom, Comcast, and Time Warner and I currently have DirecTV. They are much better than broadcast TV.

I have not and will not cut the cord.



JeepMatt
C'mon the U
Premium
join:2001-12-28
Wilmington, DE
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Comcast
reply to Foxy

said by Foxy:

I found that they couldn't correctly answer a question about cellular backup in the event the cable was cut.

Foxy-
Just for your info - yes, the Gateway does have cell backup. You can even perform a test of both from within the menus of the box.
--
"ONE team - ONE city - ONE dream!!"


JeepMatt
C'mon the U
Premium
join:2001-12-28
Wilmington, DE
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
·Comcast
reply to wardarden

Ward-
Luckily my installer knew that from the start last year. He told me right off the bat that for some reason they're given very low-quality thermostats to install - that yes, can't even support a system like you (and I) have - which is very standard these days. So, he didn't install it.

Was a bit bummed to not have that functionality as part of the service - but it more than makes up for it.
--
"ONE team - ONE city - ONE dream!!"


Foxy

join:2010-04-10
Eugene, OR
reply to JeepMatt

said by JeepMatt See Profile
Foxy-
Just for your info - yes, the Gateway does have cell backup. You can even perform a test of both from within the menus of the box.

Thanks -- I knew that from their advertising site at the time. I was calling to confirm that the cellular cost was included in their monthly fee and some other detail that I've forgotten. Unfortunately the rep I was put in touch with didn't even understand what cellular backup was.



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast

And that is just ONE of the problems when dealing with a product repackager (Comcast).
In most states it is actually a third party security/home automation supplier giving comcast a volume discount....in return comcast provides advertising, billing "tech support" really just the interface-csr's who relay to the actual companies techs...and that's the weakness, no matter where the draw the line comcast is relaying, other company is seeing "don't waste too many resources on discount customer"
and while it works OK most of the time, the ones that fall in the cracks, suffer TERRIBLE service on something that SHOULD be a 5-9's level product.
security is no good if it only responds some of the time, and as the OP found out, home automation sucks if it fails, or if the INSTALLER/company FAILS to understand what they are doing.


rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA
reply to wardarden

In this case just have the thing fixed with your hvac guy. Comcast will make sure you get your money back.



Streetlight

join:2005-11-07
Colorado Springs, CO

...Comcast will make sure you get your money back.

HoHoHo...


wardarden

join:2013-10-21
USA
reply to wardarden

Just a follow up: FINALLY a supervisor tech came out. Had someone on the phone that knew more about the thermostats than he did. changed one wire on the thermostat and gas heat was working. As he explained it to me the thermostat will not work the way my previous thermostat did. (I could select Cool, Heat (heat pump) EM Heat (gas heat)) Since I use, and greatly prefer, the gas heat 99% of the time he said he could leave the setting (dip switch) on the thermostat to gas heat and that I wouldn't be able to select heat pump. Thats fine with me.

He also stated that there is a safety feature on the thermostat that if the temp in the house falls below 62* then the heat pump will kick in. Not so sure about that but that isn't very concerning to me.

Waiting to hear back from corporate rep if they are going to compensate my account for the pitiful service. We'll see.

A Ward
Middle Tennessee


patryan9

join:2004-06-16
Bolton, CT

1 recommendation

I'm not an HVAC guy but just had a new furnace/heat pump system installed last week... the statement about the safety feature seems backward. I believe the furnace automatically kicks in (over the heat pump) if you're not getting enough heat and the temp drops... not the reverse.



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast

I believe patryan9 See Profile is correct, the failsafe is call for heat (freezeproofing) from the furnace, doubt the heat pump will be used UNLESS it is the primary source.
It is highly dependent on YOUR exact system and wiring,.
I still recommend a qualified HVAC service ASAP, broken pipes or a fried HP are too high a risk.



Streetlight

join:2005-11-07
Colorado Springs, CO
reply to patryan9

said by patryan9:

I'm not an HVAC guy but just had a new furnace/heat pump system installed last week... the statement about the safety feature seems backward. I believe the furnace automatically kicks in (over the heat pump) if you're not getting enough heat and the temp drops... not the reverse.

You're absolutely right. A heat pump uses electricity to run a compressor to move heat from outside a house to its inside. Running in reverse it can be used as an air conditioner to move heat from the inside of a house to the outside. The efficiency of such a device depends on the the temperature of the heat to be moved. If the temperature outside is too low, perhaps 32 deg F, it would be more efficient, and cost effective, to use some other source of heat to warm a house. This depends on the relative cost of those sources, but in rural places it might be liquid propane if natural gas is not available. Resistance electric heaters built into the furnace might also work, again depending on the relative cost of other fuels vs. electricity. In places where the temperature never gets too low in the winter, such as the SE USA or western coastal areas, heat pumps might be cost effective. In the end, it's all about the cost of heating and cooling a house.
--
There is nothing more deceptive than an obvious fact.

Sherlock Holmes in
The Boscombe Valley Mystery
A. C. Doyle
Strand Magazine, October 1891


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast

1 recommendation

said by Streetlight:

said by patryan9:

I'm not an HVAC guy but just had a new furnace/heat pump system installed last week... the statement about the safety feature seems backward. I believe the furnace automatically kicks in (over the heat pump) if you're not getting enough heat and the temp drops... not the reverse.

You're absolutely right. A heat pump uses electricity to run a compressor to move heat from outside a house to its inside. Running in reverse it can be used as an air conditioner to move heat from the inside of a house to the outside. The efficiency of such a device depends on the the temperature of the heat to be moved. If the temperature outside is too low, perhaps 32 deg F, it would be more efficient, and cost effective, to use some other source of heat to warm a house. This depends on the relative cost of those sources, but in rural places it might be liquid propane if natural gas is not available. Resistance electric heaters built into the furnace might also work, again depending on the relative cost of other fuels vs. electricity. In places where the temperature never gets too low in the winter, such as the SE USA or western coastal areas, heat pumps might be cost effective. In the end, it's all about the cost of heating and cooling a house.

In northern climates (like Iowa, Massachusetts, and Maine), heat pumps are all but useless. It gets just too cold for them. Here most people use either propane or gas fired boilers/forced air furnaces. In my case it's electric baseboards and I cannot use the Xfinity thermostat because my thermostats are line voltage and 240 volts would cook those thermostats and most likely cook anyone who touches them AND burn the house down.
--
I've experienced ImOn (when they were McLeod USA), Mediacom, Comcast, and Time Warner and I currently have DirecTV. They are much better than broadcast TV.

I have not and will not cut the cord.


falcor

@comcast.net

No offense but I can't believe anyone would get this kind of service from Comcast...I don't even trust them providing my internet and TV let alone hook up a device that controls my thermostat.



IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast

said by falcor :

No offense but I can't believe anyone would get this kind of service from Comcast...I don't even trust them providing my internet and TV let alone hook up a device that controls my thermostat.

I only have the home control portion through Comcast. The security portion is through a local company.

As for the thermostats, they cannot install them in Massachusetts. They have to leave them with the customer who has the option of either self installing or hiring a licensed contractor to install it.

Like I said above, with Comcast diving into the home security/home automation turf, they are getting into a grey area with licensing. Many areas have specific licensing requirements for alarm technicians and alarm companies. Not to mention many areas have a requirement for alarm permits for police response. That is why I recommend local alarm contractors as they are familiar with the local licensing/permitting requirements. Many areas even require a permit to be pulled and the system inspected before being put into service and I doubt Comcast does this.
--
I've experienced ImOn (when they were McLeod USA), Mediacom, Comcast, and Time Warner and I currently have DirecTV. They are much better than broadcast TV.

I have not and will not cut the cord.


owlyn
Premium,MVM
join:2004-06-05
Newtown, PA

Have to agree with falcor. They can't even get something they've been doing for 30+ years right. I wouldn't trust them with controlling anything in my house.



YukonHawk

join:2001-01-07
Patterson, NY
reply to wardarden

You might be better off with ADT



IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast

said by YukonHawk:

You might be better off with ADT

ADT has problems too. They have had systems fail and I know someone personally who's relatives had a business broken into and the ADT system failed. And then there was the incident where the domestic violence victim paid several thousand dollars for an ADT system that had failed and she was murdered.

You would be better off calling a local company, there are plenty of them to go around.
--
I've experienced ImOn (when they were McLeod USA), Mediacom, Comcast, and Time Warner and I currently have DirecTV. They are much better than broadcast TV.

I have not and will not cut the cord.


mb

join:2000-07-23
Washington, NJ
Reviews:
·Comcast
·Verizon Online DSL

ADT consults with the customer and ultimately designs the system as specified by the customer. Better systems cost more. In my case they use advanced Honeywell components with addressable wireless sensors and a wireless connection to the central station. The system checks itself continuously and you cant remove a smoke detector from the ceiling or open the cover on a window or door sensor or motion detector to check the battery without generating a trouble condition and getting a call from the central station. Bottom line is you get what you pay for. Comcast specializes in TV and Internet, ADT specializes in security...
--
"When will they ever learn? When will they ever learn?"
Pete Seeger 1961