dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
579
share rss forum feed

Thenewguy201

join:2013-07-27

1 edit

[Connectivity] Not having any problems but is there any way to lower your ping?

It seems like some people have lower pings than others at the same distance.



NetFixer
Snarl For The Camera Please
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

1 edit

Re: Not having any problems but is there any way to lower your ping?

The only thing you can do is to make sure that all of your coax connectors are clean and tight, and also make sure that your modem is connected to the lowest db loss leg of the first splitter (if your installation has splitters). Anything else would have to be done in Comcast's infrastructure (and or in the routing *).

But unless you have some really bad physical connections (or your modem is on the end of a long multiple splitter string), none of that is likely to produce any measurable difference in your average ping times.

* As for routing, you may be able to get different routing if you clone a different MAC address into your router's WAN interface, but that may or may not help, and it can only be done if you are using a standard cable modem and your own router (and you will need to reboot both the modem and the router after making any such change).

EDIT: I forgot to mention that if you are using WiFi instead of an Ethernet connection, using an Ethernet connection can also lower your local ping times. As an example of this, here are WiFi pings to my AT&T modem, and Ethernet pings to my Comcast modem:

C:\>ping 192.168.1.254
 
Pinging 192.168.1.254 with 32 bytes of data:
 
Reply from 192.168.1.254: bytes=32 time=5ms TTL=63
Reply from 192.168.1.254: bytes=32 time=5ms TTL=63
Reply from 192.168.1.254: bytes=32 time=5ms TTL=63
Reply from 192.168.1.254: bytes=32 time=10ms TTL=63
 
Ping statistics for 192.168.1.254:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 5ms, Maximum = 10ms, Average = 6ms
 
C:\>ping 192.168.100.1
 
Pinging 192.168.100.1 with 32 bytes of data:
 
Reply from 192.168.100.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=63
Reply from 192.168.100.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=63
Reply from 192.168.100.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=63
Reply from 192.168.100.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=63
 
Ping statistics for 192.168.100.1:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
 

--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to Thenewguy201

Lantancy (ping) is largely a function of distance in modern networks, however the distance that counts is the network path, not as the crow flies from your location to the endpoint.
The slowest equipment (and that most likely to be overload) is in your home and at the other end if a non-commercial location (ie someone elses home network)
reducing the load within your computer or on your LAN MAY have a small but (occasionally) noticeable effect which you can try to change.
time of day and usage based congestion on your ISP's network or on the backbones (the actual INTERnet) are way beyond your control.


andyross
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-04
Schaumburg, IL
reply to Thenewguy201

About the only factors would be how you connect to the router or modem. Wireless could have slightly higher latency. Gigabit may or may not make a slight difference. The router itself might have a slight delay.

Realistically, other than avoiding wireless, you most likely would only have a few (probably under 5ms, probably much less) to play with in your own network.

Most of it will be out of your control. A D3 modem will help as it allows the data to be spread out and avoid congestion on your local node. Even with that, if alot of your neighbors are streaming at the same time, or your CMTS starts to get clogged, your latency will start to jump up.



Kasoah

join:2013-08-20

1 edit
reply to Thenewguy201

I have tested 3 modems minutes apart. Quake Live netgraph to test.

With the zoom 5341, I get 25-28ms
With the comcast gateway tc8305c I get 24-28ms

on the zoom 5341j I get 21-24ms.

These are tested minutes in separation on the same server. (Same map, empty server)

However, the zoom 5341j, seems to handle jitter worse. The other modems seem to provide a more constant jitter that doesn't spike.

The 5341j seems to keep it flat constantly or random spike hard.

Other than that, no real way to lower your ping.

EDIT: i take that back. The 5341 handles it the best, then the 5341j. The tc8305c is just garbage



EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:9
reply to Thenewguy201

FWIW, ICMP packet based ping tools are not the best barometer for measuring latency.